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  • Firefighter Deaths

    Prayers to the families of the eight firefighters killed west of Vail, Oregon today. Head on collision with semi-truck. They were returning from the South Fork fire in Idaho, returning to Roseburg, Oregon. Our thoughts and prayers are with the families.
    P. Bishop

  • #2
    On behalf of myself and the entire New Jersey Forest Fire Service, I would like to extend my sincere condolences to the family and friends of these fine young firefighters. May God bless and comfort those who have been touched by this tragedy.

    Ed Seifert
    NJFFS16
    New Jersey Forest Fire Service
    Engine A16
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

    Comment


    • #3
      SEATTLE (Reuters) - Firefighters battling blazes
      across a wide swath of the Western United States were shaken by
      the deaths of eight comrades in one of the worst highway
      crashes in recent memory, officials said Monday.
      Hundreds of people deployed across the arid, rugged region
      were given the option of taking a day off to recover from the
      shock by talking with counselors and reflecting on their roles
      and safety in the hills and forests -- and on the way home.
      "It makes everybody's heart sink. It's a real hard time for
      wildland firefighters all across the country when they hear
      about these tragedies," said Susan Emley, a fire information
      officer working with several state and federal agencies.
      Eight Oregon men headed home from fighting fires in Idaho
      were killed Sunday when their van tried to pass a
      tractor-trailer rig on a twisting, two-lane Oregon highway and
      crashed head-on into another rig, bursting into flames.
      The victims, ranging in age from 19 to 37, worked for a
      private fire-fighting contractor, First Strike Environmental,
      based in Roseburg, Oregon.
      "I've seen some terrible (wrecks). I've never been to one
      where we've had eight fatalities," Malheur County Under Sheriff
      Brian Wolfe said. "It's always difficult any time you have any
      fatality or even serious injury, and then you just multiply
      that by eight times or even nine times or 10 times, because you
      have to deal with the people that were injured as well."
      The Sheriff's office said four of the men were from
      Roseburg. They were: Ricardo Ruiz, 19; Jesse James, 22; Leland
      Price, 27; and Jeff Hengel, 21.
      The others included Paul Gibson, 25, and Mark Ransdell, 23,
      both of Myrtle Creek, Oregon, and David Hammer, 38, and Richard
      Moore, 21, both of Portland.

      CLOSE GROUP
      First Strike, which provides services ranging from drug lab
      decontamination to underground storage tank removal, also
      offered counseling to its employees.
      "These were all fine young men who had worked together for
      two years. They were closer than most and the hole they leave
      is enormous," First Strike President Robert Krueger said in a
      prepared statement.
      Contractors supply a large portion of the crews fighting
      wildfires, Emley said, and safety training is a key part of
      preparation for all crew members.
      But fatalities occur nearly every year, ranging from front
      line "microbursts" of flames, to air tanker crashes and roadway
      accidents.
      Last year five firefighters who worked out of La Grande,
      Oregon, were killed when the van they were driving in rolled
      over in Colorado, on the road to the front lines of a
      wildfire.
      "Firefighting is inherently dangerous. Everybody goes
      through a ton or training to be as safe as we can," Emley
      said.
      Some 18,736 people were fighting fires in the West covering
      a total of 434,000 acres stretching from
      Alaska to Texas. Another 110,000 acres were
      being allowed to burn under forest management programs.
      Across the border in Canada's British Columbia, fires have
      destroyed hundreds of homes and forced thousands of people to
      flee the approaching flames.
      REUTERS
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment

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