Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Idaho 2003

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    August 10th

    DUBOIS, Idaho (AP) - Bureau of Land Management crews brought the
    Deep fire to 65 percent containment Sunday morning and sending some
    of their firefighters to other blazes in Idaho and Utah.
    Crews from local fire departments will take responsibility for
    the blaze over the week.
    Fire bosses said Saturday that heavy night air helped crews gain
    the upper hand. They are estimating full containment for Monday or
    Tuesday.
    A 25-mile stretch of trail beginning at Beaverhead Deer Lodge
    remains closed and officials say will not reopen until full
    containment has been reached.
    Activity on the eastern side of the 9,420-acre Slims fire near
    Elk City picked up Sunday as temperatures reached into the low 90s.
    Fire bosses are still estimating full containment for Aug. 20.
    About 700 people were on the fire, which has already cost nearly
    $9 million to fight. Crews held the fire Sunday at 50 percent
    containment.
    Other activity in the Clearwater and Nez Perce National Forests
    included the Clear/Nez Fire Use Complex that includes the Toboggan,
    Rock Garden, Divide, Ranger Lake, McConnell, McConnell Northeast,
    Freeze Out and 62 Creek fires.
    The fires are located on the Powell, Lochsa and North Fork
    Ranger Districts of the Clearwater National Forest and the Moose
    Creek Ranger District on the Nez Perce National Forest.
    All eight fires together are less than 100 acres and officials
    are developing a plan to use them for natural resource benefits.
    Farther south crews continued to work toward confining the
    625-acre North Fork Lick fire in the Payette National Forest. The
    fire 18 miles northeast of McCall remained at 75 percent
    containment. Nearly 200 firefighters are on the scene and fire
    bosses estimate full containment would be reached Monday.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

    Comment


    • #17
      BOISE, Idaho (AP) - As investigators continue their inquiry into
      the deaths of firefighters Jeff Allen and Shane Heath last month,
      some specialists suggest the strategy of structure protection may
      have contributed to their deaths.
      The investigation's early findings indicate that Allen and Heath
      did not call for assistance at the helicopter landing area they
      were clearing until shortly before they reportedly died - a fact
      that has lead some to believe the fire was moving explosively fast.
      "This thing hit them quick and hit them fast," said Camille
      Hayes, a 14-year firefighting veteran and member of the Allen and
      Heath's Indianola helitack crew.
      Some specialists argue that a century of forest management
      emphasizing structure protection as the top priority helped
      fostered development of dense undergrowth on steep slopes -
      undergrowth that before the past century would have been cleared by
      periodic wildfire.
      Historically, fire ran through the Salmon National Forest as
      frequently as every seven years.
      The smaller foliage is prime fuel for rapid fire growth. For
      some it could explain why Allen and Heath - overwhelmingly
      considered by co-workers to be safety conscious and highly
      competent firefighters - were so quickly overcome by the Cramer
      Fire south of Long Tom Lookout.
      Some experts think individual landowners should take more
      responsibility for structure protection. But changing the current
      policy would unleash a political firestorm in its own right.
      "It's just too hard politically. We have over-promised people
      that we can protect their property from forest fires," said Steve
      Arno, a retired U.S. Forest Service fire scientist. "That's such
      an incredible entitlement. Many of these homes are really
      undefendable from any practical standpoint."
      Investigators have issued no formal conclusions and hope to
      complete their examination into Allen and Heath's deaths in the
      next three to five weeks.

      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment


      • #18
        August 11th

        CASCADE, Idaho (AP) - Firefighters protected summer cabins near
        west-central Idaho's Warm Lake on Monday as more crews moved onto
        the line of the South Fork fire.
        The blaze, 25 miles northeast of Cascade, reached 750 acres as
        it raced along ridges, torching dry timber. Air tankers pelted the
        flames with retardant while about 190 people tried to steer it away
        from the Paradise Valley summer home area.
        Fire bosses ordered eight 20-person fire crews and engines. The
        cause of the South Fork fire was under investigation since no
        lightning strikes were reported over the weekend.
        Thunderbolt Lookout was evacuated as a safety precaution.
        In the same area, crews continued to confine the 700-acre North
        Fork Lick fire on the Payette National Forest. The fire - 18 miles
        northeast of McCall - remained at 50 percent containment.
        Seventy-fire firefighters were on the scene.
        The Hall fire on the Payette north of Council had burned 850
        acres seven miles north of Council and destroyed two outbuildings.
        U.S. Highway 95 between Council and New Meadows was closed to all
        but local and emergency traffic because smoke obscured visibility.
        To the north, the Slims fire grew to 9,700 acres, torching
        timber within its own perimeter. It was still burning near the
        remote community of Elk City. About 630 people were on the blaze,
        and nearly $9 million has been spent on its suppression.
        Containment was not predicted until Aug. 20.
        The rugged Lolo Motorway trail which follows the Lewis and Clark
        expedition's route over the Bitterroot Mountains was closed down
        and evacuated because of the 2,000-acre Beaver Lake blaze near the
        Montana border. There was no estimate on containment.
        A guard camp was evacuated in the face of the 580-acre
        Falconberry fire on the Salmon-Challis National Forest east of
        Stanley. Containment was anticipated for Friday. The Lost Packer
        complex on the forest was just creeping, having burned 680 acres.
        It was not being actively fought.
        The Deep fire burning near the Montana border and northwest of
        Dubois was contained at 37,682 acres.
        Two range fires burned about 4,000 acres in south-central Idaho.
        The 1,500-acre Foothills blaze two miles south of Picabo was
        contained last Sunday before it could damage several threatened
        structures. The Timmerman fire scorched 2,500 acres and containment
        was expected by Tuesday.

        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #19
          8/18

          BOISE, Idaho (AP) - Tinder dry forest and rangeland conditions
          have prompted fire managers to impose tighter restrictions on
          nearly all public lands in southern Idaho this week.
          Stage 2 fire restrictions will begin Friday, the Boise
          Interagency Logistics Center announced on Monday.
          The new rules will prohibit campfires at all locations,
          including developed campsites, and will prohibit cigarette smoking
          anywhere except within designated campsites, inside vehicles or
          buildings or within a cleared space at least three feet wide.
          Additionally, between 1 p.m. and 1 a.m., motorized vehicle use
          off designated roads or trails will not be allowed; nor will the
          use of chain saws or other engine-powered logging or timber
          equipment.
          "We are at record-setting dry conditions with no real relief in
          sight," said Gail Baer, Fire Information officer for the
          Salmon-Challis National Forest. "Given these conditions combined
          with the extreme fire behavior on recent fires and the increase of
          human caused fires, these restrictions are an important tool to
          help reduce the chance of new ignitions."
          The restrictions will effect the Boise and Payette national
          forests, the Sawtooth National Forest north of Interstate 84, the
          Salmon Challis National Forest west of Highway 93, along with
          numerous southern Idaho lands managed by the Bureau of Land
          Management and the State of Idaho.
          Throughout the state, 17 wildfires were reported burning on more
          than 80,000 acres Monday.
          Highway 21, a major route between southwestern and eastern
          Idaho, was reopened after the Canyon Creek forest fire forced its
          closure a week before.
          Departing firefighters also left the remote communities of Elk
          City and Red River with a new plan to keep them safe should the
          Slim's fire or future blazes race to their doorsteps.
          Fire officials at the Boise National Forest hoped to contain the
          5,475-acre Canyon Creek fire 20 miles northeast of Lowman by Aug.
          28. Nearly 720 firefighters remained on the lines Monday, and had
          the blaze 55 percent contained.
          Highway 21 between Grandjean and Banner Creek was reopened, but
          motorists should plan on waiting for a pilot car between 6 a.m. and
          9 p.m. Traffic is open the rest of the day.
          To the north on the Boise forest, crews continued efforts to
          secure the north end of the 5,385-acre South Fork fire 25 miles
          northeast of Cascade. The blaze was reported to be 60 percent
          contained Monday evening. Idaho Power Co. is also working to
          restore power to the community of Yellow Pine.
          In north-central Idaho, U.S. Highway 12 was closed between Greer
          and Kamiah. The Milepost 59 blaze was reportedly causing burning
          trees and rocks to roll across the roadway.
          The fire on state forestry land grew to 5,500 acres by Monday
          and was 55 percent contained.
          The closure on Highway 12 between Lolo, Mont., and Lowell by the
          9,700-acre Beaver Lake complex has been lifted. The fire has
          moderated with cooler temperatures and light rain.
          The 12,250-acre Slim's fire complex on the Nez Perce National
          Forest east of Grangeville grew after the Poet Branch fire
          expanded. Fire information officer Mike Cody said the blaze was 20
          percent contained, but a red flag warning was expected Tuesday,
          along with high winds.
          "We could be in for some trouble. We're going to tighten it up
          and hope for the best," Cody said.
          The departing California Interagency Incident Management Team
          that has managed suppression on the Slim's complex presented plan
          which concentrates on protecting structures and identifying
          evacuation routes.
          "All the information is transferable and durable, so we can use
          that at any time," Nez Perce Forest Supervisor Bruce Bernhardt
          said.
          The document includes an assessment of fire danger and notes
          where water pumps can be placed.
          Each of the homes and buildings around Elk City and Red River
          were entered into a global positioning system so any firefighting
          team can pick up the plan and find them.
          In eastern Idaho, residents evacuated from the Sunset Heights
          subdivision near Salmon had the choice of going home as the
          10,500-acre Withington fire on the Salmon-Challis forest retreated
          to a less threatening position.
          Authorities warned that further evacuations could be announced
          at any time. But officials reopened U.S. Highway 93, the main
          north-south road connecting Idaho to Montana.

          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment

          300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

          Collapse

          Upper 300x250

          Collapse

          Taboola

          Collapse

          Leader

          Collapse
          Working...
          X