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  • Idaho 2003

    (Boise, Idaho-AP) -- Idaho fire crews are protecting homes in
    the face of a wind-driven wildfire near the Montana border.
    Salmon-Challis National Forest officials say the Tobias fire is
    burning in the Hayden Creek drainage, 30 miles southeast of Salmon.
    Smoke obscures the blaze, which could be between two-thousand
    and ten-thousand acres. Overflights are anticipated to map the
    fire. Its cause is unknown.
    At least 20 structures were threatened and homeowners were asked
    to leave yesterday.
    Meanwhile, the Blackwall fire has now burned about 370 acres
    near the Continental Divide, between the Big Hole area in Montana
    and Gibbonsville, Idaho. The Forest Service says the blaze could
    reach heavy timber in Montana, and would be hard to stop.


    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  • #2
    July 16th

    LEADORE, Idaho (AP) - Fire crews had the Tobias fire 40 percent
    contained late Wednesday and officials expected better weather to
    aid the fight later this week.
    The blaze, burning actively in mixed fir forest on the western
    front of the Lemhi Mountains, was estimated at 14,500 acres, said
    fire information officer Julian Rhinehart. Earlier this week
    officials estimated the blaze at more than 16,000 acres, but recent
    GPS satellite imaging provided a more accurate estimate, Rhinehart
    said.
    More than 320 workers were fighting the fire on Wednesday.
    "There are a lot of dead trees and snags on this fire,"
    Incident Commander Bill Van Bruggen said. "And we certainly
    wouldn't want to risk any kind of injury to save a few acres."
    Officials have said it would take at least another week to fully
    contain the blaze 30 miles south of Salmon.
    Crews were looking forward to higher humidity and precipitation
    levels predicted this week, Rhinehart said.
    Salmon-Challis National Forest spokesman Nick Zufelt said no
    structures were being threatened. Fire protection was still in
    place at some locations after the fire claimed a vacation cabin and
    at least 10 outbuildings earlier in the week.
    That forced rancher Rick Snyder, who also sits on the Lemhi
    County Commission, to cut fences to get 300 head of cattle clear of
    the flames.
    "I'll have to stay off that burned allotment for two years,"
    Snyder said. "But that grass will heal up in a year or two. What
    I'm thinking about is what kind of impact this fire will have on
    recreation. Nobody wants to recreate in the black soot."
    Fire crews are using the small town of Leadore as their base
    camp, dramatically boosting the economy of the community of 90.
    Seventy miles north, just below Lost Trail Pass, more than 150
    firefighters battled the 280-acre Blackwell fire burning in
    roadless forest near the Continental Divide.
    Fire officials had no target for containment of that blaze,
    which air reconnaissance showed was not as large as originally
    believed.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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    • #3
      July 17th

      LEADORE, Idaho (AP) - Fire bosses hoped the prevailing winds
      would continue to help them Thursday as they worked to gain the
      upper hand on the 14,500-acre Tobias fire churning through heavy
      timber near the Montana border.
      "We're still chasing it," Salmon-Challis National Forest
      spokesman Nick Zufelt said. "Yesterday was a good day, though. The
      winds didn't last as long and they pushed the fire upslope and back
      into itself."
      The fire, which started over the weekend, is burning actively in
      fir forest on the western front of the Lemhi Mountains.
      Zufelt said 325 firefighters had contained portions of the north
      and east sides of the blaze, or about 40 percent of the perimeter.
      More crews have been ordered.
      Fire protection was still in place at some locations after the
      blaze claimed a vacation cabin and at least 10 outbuildings earlier
      in the week.
      Zufelt said the thick timber and deadfall precluded most night
      work on the fire line.
      "It has lots of debris," he said. "There are too many snags
      falling and we're not going to risk somebody."
      Seventy miles north, just below Lost Trail Pass, more than 150
      firefighters battled the 325-acre Blackwall fire straddling the
      Continental Divide.
      The winds blowing from the southwest helped firefighters scratch
      out containment lines on the Idaho side. But the blaze is largely
      unstaffed on the Montana side, which is a remote roadless area. The
      Blackwall was 10 percent contained.
      State and federal firefighters were dispatched to 14 fires in
      the Panhandle after a storm rolled through late Tuesday, putting
      down more than 100 strikes.
      Idaho Department of Lands workers were dropped in by helicopter
      outside of St. Maries to begin containing the small blazes. Other
      fires were reported near Cataldo.

      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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      • #4
        7/20

        Crews battle fire along middle fork of the Boise River

        (Atlanta, Idaho-AP) -- Firefighters are battling a 15-acre blaze
        that was reported yesterday afternoon along the Middle Fork of the
        Boise River 12 miles west of Atlanta.
        More than 80 firefighters are on the scene, including crews from
        the Southern Idaho Correctional Institute, the U-S Fish and
        Wildlife Service and the Boise National Forest. Four helicopters
        and two water tenders are also assisting.
        Fire bosses have requested seven additional crews to fight the
        blaze that is burning along steep terrain in heavy downed timber.
        Winds are predicted to range from 15 to 20 miles per hour in the
        fire's vicinity, making the crews' job even harder.
        The cause of the fire is unknown.


        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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        • #5
          7/20

          Fire crews take advantage of good weather to battle blazes

          (Leadore-AP) -- Interagency firefighters used cool weather and
          low winds this weekend to get a jump on the Tobias fire southeast
          of Salmon.
          Crews have the fire 75 percent contained and steady at
          14-thousand-500 acres. Fire bosses are concentrating on holding the
          fire lines and making sure flare-ups don't occur.
          Officials hope to begin releasing some of the more than 700
          firefighters assigned to the blaze as early as today and plan to
          meet their Tuesday full containment target.
          Crews also took advantage of good weather to tackle the
          one-thousand-440 acre Blackwall fire north of Salmon. Crews have
          the fire ten percent contained but have no target for full
          containment.
          The Eightmile and Sleeping Deer lightning fires north and west
          of Challis were burning at less than one acre apiece today.

          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

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          • #6
            7/22

            BOISE, Idaho (AP) - Huge plumes of smoke rose into the air
            Tuesday evening as the Hot Creek fire in the Boise National Forest
            exploded from 40 acres to 4,000 acres.
            David Olson, a spokesman with the Boise National Forest, said
            high temperatures and low humidity levels, along with a breeze
            along the canyon floor, contributed to the fire's spread.
            "We're trying to regroup and restrategize, and we're basically
            starting over," he said.
            Olson said a new management team was to arrive on Wednesday, and
            additional firefighters, engines and helicopters would be
            requested.
            The Hot Creek fire is actively burning in steep, rugged terrain
            about 10 miles west of Atlanta, Olson said, but no buildings were
            threatened by the blaze.
            Meanwhile, firefighters in eastern Idaho continued to work on
            the 4,500-acre Harkness range fire near McCammon.
            Interagency Dispatch Center Manager Kevin Conran said the blaze
            burned two homes, two barns and a handful of smaller buildings
            Monday. By Tuesday evening, the fire was about 80 percent contained
            and was no longer threatening any structures.
            Residents who had been evacuated from about 40 homes were
            allowed to return on Tuesday morning, and Idaho 30 was reopened at
            the same time.
            The blaze was started by a transient, authorities said.
            Dale Takeo, 41, was arrested after he told deputies that he
            started the fire, Bannock County Sheriff Lorin Nielsen said. Takeo
            was being held at the county jail on suspicion of third-degree
            arson.
            More than 600 firefighters were mopping up the 14,500-acre
            Tobias fire, burning rangelands 18 miles north of Leadore. The fire
            was estimated to be about 95 percent contained with full
            containment expected Wednesday.
            The Crystal Creek fire was burning 300 acres 18 miles north of
            Stanley in central Idaho. Heavy air tankers were working the fire
            and a larger contingent of firefighters was expected to arrive
            sometime Tuesday. A 20-person crew was also fighting the nearby
            Dutch Creek fire, estimated at about 10 acres.
            The Cramer fire, burning in steep terrain about 34 miles west of
            Salmon, expanded to 220 acres. Several crews were expected to
            supplement the team assigned to the fire. Air tankers were
            assisting.
            In north-central Idaho, fire crews were pulled back from the
            Slims fire while helicopters dropped water. The blaze 35 miles east
            of Grangeville grew to about 610 acres by Tuesday afternoon.
            Starting Saturday, campfires and cigarettes will be restricted
            on the Targhee-Caribou National Forest and nearby desert lands.
            Similar fire restrictions already are in place in Yellowstone
            National Park. Smoking is prohibited unless inside an enclosed car
            or building.

            (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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            • #7
              July 24th

              BOISE, Idaho (AP) - The two helitack firefighters who died while
              battling a blaze in the Salmon-Challis national forest probably
              died very quickly, the Lemhi County coroner said Thursday.
              Jeff Allen, 24, of Salmon and Shane Heath, 22, of Melba, were
              killed in the Cramer fire Tuesday night about 17 miles west of
              Shoup. After rappelling from a helicopter, the two were preparing a
              landing zone when the blaze exploded around them.
              "They got caught in a fireball," Coroner Mike Mitchell said.
              "It was very quick."
              The remains of both men have been released to their families,
              Mitchell said.
              The deaths of the two firefighters drew sympathy from the Bush
              Administration, Idaho's congressional delegation and Gov. Dirk
              Kempthorne, who ordered state flags flown at half-staff on
              Thursday.
              "We are all deeply saddened by this tragedy," U.S. Department
              of Agriculture Secretary Ann M. Veneman said in a prepared
              statement.
              Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo said Allen and Heath died as heroes.
              "These men are heroes of battle, just as the men and women
              fighting overseas, and they fought a faceless, terrifying enemy
              with bravery, heroism, and selfless dedication to the families and
              communities of central Idaho," Crapo said.
              Allen began working as a seasonal firefighter in 1999, when he
              joined the Indianola Helitack Crew. He was a business student at
              Boise State University.
              Heath, also a Boise State student, was in his second year as an
              Indianola Helitack Crew member and had been a wildland firefighter
              for four years.
              A national fire team was sent Wednesday to take command of the
              fire, which had blown across more than 5,400 acres by Thursday
              morning. It was not threatening any structures.
              After taking Wednesday off to regroup, the 170 firefighters
              already fighting the fire resumed operations Thursday. More than
              300 reinforcements are expected to begin arriving in the next few
              days, said fire information officer Jennifer Rabuck.
              Meanwhile, other fires continued to burn.
              Crews returned to the Hot Creek blaze on Thursday after they
              driven away from the fire line Wednesday by extremely heavy smoke.
              The blaze spread across 15,360 acres and was burning 40 miles
              northeast of Boise.
              Fire information officer Cyd Weiland said more than 400
              firefighters would concentrate on building an east-west line on the
              south end of the fire.
              The fire was burning about three miles from Atlanta, but the
              historic mining town was not considered to be in danger, Weiland
              said. Still, the Elmore County Sheriff's Office decided Thursday
              afternoon that no additional visitors or residents would be allowed
              into the Atlanta area for now.
              Some of Thursday's weather conditions were working in
              firefighters' favor.
              Temperatures in southwestern Idaho were expected to be 10
              degrees cooler and relative humidity was rising from bone-dry
              levels earlier in the week. However, the possibility of
              thunderstorms presented a higher potential for lightning strikes,
              Weiland said.
              It was not known when the fire would be contained and roads to
              the area remained closed Thursday.
              In north-central Idaho, the Slims fire burning 35 miles east of
              Grangeville continued to grow, reaching 1,400 acres by Thursday
              evening. More than 250 firefighters were attempting to burn behind
              the fire to create a fire line. But three helicopters assigned to
              the blaze were unable to fly Thursday afternoon because an
              inversion was causing poor visibility.
              In central Idaho, 157 firefighters were working to contain the
              Crystal Creek fire, burning on about 1,000 acres. That fire also
              continued to spread.

              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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              • #8
                7/27

                More than 1,700 firefighters spread across Idaho

                (Salmon-AP) -- Heavy rainstorms, higher humidity and lower
                temperatures have helped the more than 17-hundred firefighters
                battling four major wildfires across the state.
                Crews held nearly all the major fires in place, even bumping up
                some containment percentages.
                A series of landslides blocking the Salmon River Road are still
                being cleared for access to the Cramer fire site and officials
                expect a route will be open in about four days.
                Crews held the 19-thousand-acre Hot Creek Fire 50 miles
                northeast of Boise at five percent containment while firefighters
                reported reduced activity at the more than one thousand-acre
                Crystal Fire outside Stanley.
                Rain and substantial increases in equipment and personnel kept
                the 22 hundred-acre Slims Fire from growing any further and allowed
                crews to bump containment up to 15 percent.
                A 250-acre fire near Coolin in northern Idaho may pick up speed
                if weather conditions dry out. Fire bosses at the Hunt Creek Fire
                expect reinforcements as early as tomorrow.


                (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

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                • #9
                  7/28 Update

                  (Boise-AP) -- The Cramer fire is still burning on about
                  56-hundred acres near Salmon this evening.
                  It's about 80 percent contained, and fire bosses predict that it
                  will be fully contained by Thursday.
                  Meanwhile, a half dozen large wildfires continued to burn on a
                  combined 37-thousand acres throughout the state.
                  The Hot Creek fire northeast of Boise is still the largest fire
                  in Idaho. It's burning on nearly 19,500 acres west of Atlanta. It's
                  about 15 percent contained.
                  In northern Idaho, firefighters are trying to get a jump on the
                  new Hunt Creek fire. It's burning on about 300 acres eight miles
                  northwest of Coolin.
                  And the Slims fire has consumed 22-hundred acres about 35 miles
                  east of Grangeville.


                  (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                  • #10
                    By CHUCK OXLEY
                    Associated Press Writer
                    BOISE, Idaho (AP) - The two firefighters who died battling the
                    Cramer fire last week did not use their portable fire shelter,
                    investigators said.
                    Investigative Team Leader Linda Donoghue released the
                    preliminary investigative report Monday afternoon. The full
                    investigation could take up to six weeks to complete.
                    According to the report, Jeff Allen, 24, of Salmon and Shane
                    Heath, 22, of Melba both rappelled onto a ridgeline above the fire
                    last Tuesday morning.
                    The blaze was then 220 acres, burning about 30 miles northwest
                    of Salmon. The men intended to clear an area where helicopters
                    could land.
                    By midafternoon, other handcrew members who had been flown into
                    the fire were pulled away because of increasing danger, and Allen
                    and Heath called a helicopter to get them out, saying it was
                    becoming very smoky in their area.
                    But the helicopter sent to pick up the men was unable to land
                    because of extremely poor visibility, Donoghue said.
                    Radio contact with the rappellers was lost, and helicopters
                    continued to search for Allen and Heath. Later that day, two more
                    rappellers were sent into the fire area to search on foot for the
                    men, and the helicopter pilots were able to guide the searchers to
                    the bodies.
                    Neither Allen nor Heath was in a fire shelter, Donoghue said.
                    Fire shelters are small tent-like fire-resistant sheaths that
                    firefighters can use for protection if they cannot escape flames.
                    Services for Allen were held in Salmon on Saturday. Heath's
                    funeral was Monday in Nampa. He was buried in Melba.
                    The Cramer fire, still burning on about 5,614 acres, was 80
                    percent contained Monday evening. Fire bosses predict that the 367
                    firefighters on the lines should have if fully contained by
                    Thursday.
                    Meanwhile, fire restrictions are increasing in western and
                    central Idaho as the wildfire season continues.
                    Cigarette smoking and camp fires anywhere except designated
                    sites are already prohibited in eastern Idaho.
                    As of Friday, those restrictions will also apply to the Sawtooth
                    National Forest, as well as nearby lands managed by the National
                    Park Service, the Bureau of Land Management and the state.
                    "We are experiencing `extreme' fire danger on the entire
                    Sawtooth National Forest," said Randy Richter, Sawtooth National
                    Forest fire and aviation management officer.
                    "Fuels are the driest they have been in the past 20 years" and
                    could surpass all records in some portions of the forest, he added.
                    Throughout the state on Monday, a half dozen large wildfires
                    continued to burn on a combined 37,000 acres.
                    -The Hot Creek fire northeast of Boise is still the largest fire
                    in the state. It's burning on 19,489 acres west of Atlanta. About
                    800 firefighters backed by nine helicopters and 18 fire engines are
                    battling the blaze, which is about 15 percent contained. Fire
                    bosses have been trying to steer the blaze into the area that was
                    burned in the Trail Creek fire three years ago.
                    So far, the Hot Creek fire has cost nearly $2.3 million and has
                    burned one outbuilding. It is estimated to be 15 percent contained.
                    -In northern Idaho, firefighters were trying to get a quick jump
                    on the new Hunt Creek fire, burning on about 300 acres of mostly
                    logging slash about eight miles northwest of Coolin. The 190
                    firefighters are backed up with three helicopters and have the
                    blaze about 20 percent contained. Full containment expected by
                    Wednesday.
                    -In north-central Idaho, wind continues to push the Slims fire
                    up numerous new canyons. So far, the blaze has consumed 2,200 acres
                    of forest 35 miles east of Grangeville. About 380 firefighters were
                    working with four helicopters. The blaze was 15 percent contained
                    Monday.
                    -The combined Black Frog Complex in north-central Idaho and
                    southwestern Montana, straddling the Continental Divide in several
                    national forests roughly 30 miles north of Salmon. Together, the
                    two fires have burned about 8,000 acres. The 783 firefighters have
                    the fire about 27 percent contained.

                    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
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                    • #11
                      7/29

                      BOISE, Idaho (AP) - Wildland firefighters were called to two new
                      Idaho blazes Tuesday.
                      In southern Idaho, the Wilkins Fire quickly burned through 4,500
                      acres of juniper, brush and grass fuels about a mile west of Murphy
                      Hot Springs near the Nevada state line.
                      The fire was burning in extremely steep and rugged canyon
                      terrain along the Jarbidge River's East Fork, officials said, and
                      crews worked Tuesday to save bull trout habitat threatened by the
                      flames.
                      Sixty-six firefighters and two helicopters were battling the
                      blaze, which was considered 10 percent contained Tuesday. Fire
                      bosses predicted it would be fully contained by Wednesday.
                      In northern Idaho, the Hunt Creek fire was burning on about 350
                      acres eight miles northwest of Coolin in heavy logging slash; 244
                      firefighters were assigned to the blaze, which was considered 25
                      percent contained. Full containment was expected by the weekend.
                      Elsewhere in Idaho, firefighters continued to gain ground on
                      other large blazes:
                      -The Hot Creek fire on the Boise National Forest grew to 20,042
                      acres and was reported 20 percent contained. Eight helicopters and
                      827 firefighters were attacking the blaze, which was burning in
                      heavy forest about eight miles west of Atlanta. Active burns
                      continued overnight and evacuations of summer cabins and camping
                      areas remained in effect. The Hot Creek is currently Idaho's
                      largest wildfire and has cost an estimated $2.8 million to fight.
                      -There was no significant increase in the size of the Black Frog
                      complex, which is actually two fires that straddle the
                      Idaho-Montana state line and cover parts of several national
                      forests.
                      The Blackwall fire has burned 4,740 acres and the Frog Pond fire
                      has burned 2,091 acres. Including spot fires inside the complex, a
                      total of about 7,500 acres have burned.
                      About 790 workers are fighting the complex, which is about 30
                      percent contained.
                      The intensity of burning is likely to increase in the coming
                      days, Byron Bonny, the fire team's fire behavior analyst said.
                      "We're right back into the hot and dry period," Bonny said.
                      -The Crystal Creek fire, burning on the Frank Church River of No
                      Return Wilderness Area, was winding down. The fire consumed 1,319
                      acres of mixed brush, fir and grasslands but was considered 75
                      percent contained. Some of the 301 firefighters were expected to be
                      reassigned. The fire is 18 miles northwest of Stanley.
                      -Also in central Idaho, the Cramer fire continued to burn on
                      5,614 acres 20 miles west of North Fork with only minimal fire
                      activity overnight. Firefighters were still protecting 38
                      residences in the Salmon-Challis National Forest. The blaze was
                      reportedly 85 percent contained, with full containment expected
                      Thursday.
                      -In northern Idaho, a national firefighting team has been called
                      to the Slims fire, burning on the Nez Perce National Forest 35
                      miles east of Grangeville. Fourteen crews with 467 firefighters
                      were battling the blaze, which has charred 2,650 acres of ponderosa
                      and mixed conifer trees. It is considered 20 percent contained but
                      no target date has been set for full containment.

                      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
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                      • #12
                        30th of July

                        VIOLA, Idaho (AP) - Four homes and several outbuildings were
                        destroyed and nearly 40 more were evacuated after a fire started
                        Wednesday afternoon.
                        The Flannagan fire in northern Idaho may have begun in one home
                        before spreading to another and jumping across a road to endanger
                        more structures, Latah County sheriff's public information officer
                        Darla Buckley said.
                        By Wednesday night, the blaze was burning on about 110 acres in
                        a wooded area four miles east of Viola, Linda McFaddan, an
                        information officer with the Coeur d'Alene Dispatch Center said.
                        About 40 firefighters were battling the flames.
                        More than a half dozen major fires continued to burn across the
                        state on Wednesday, and the nation's wildfire fighting strategists
                        believe conditions are worsening throughout the west.
                        Kathy Jo Pollock at the Interagency Fire Center says the experts
                        believe the likelihood for fire now "is higher that what we had in
                        2000 and in 1988, when we had the big Yellowstone fires.
                        "The danger of fire is extremely high for the next three to
                        four weeks," she said. "That's our peak season."
                        Fire restrictions remained in place across the state as two new
                        fires were reported on separate sides of the state.
                        More than 100 firefighters were fighting the 800-acre Andy fire
                        burning in range near Weiser in western Idaho and expected to
                        contain it quickly despite its remote location.
                        Another 100 firefighters were in the sage and juniper terrain
                        east of Franklin in southeastern Idaho battling the Oxkiller fire.
                        They had containment line on 10 percent of the 350-acre fire.
                        In other Idaho fires:
                        -Crews had the upper hand on the Wilkins fire on the southern
                        Idaho range near Murphy Hot Springs. Despite rolling debris in
                        steep, rugged canyons, more than 80 percent of the 4,500-acre blaze
                        was contained.
                        -The Hot Creek fire burning about three miles west of Atlanta
                        remained the state's largest at over 22,000 acres in the Boise
                        National Forest. More than 800 firefighters had the blaze about 30
                        percent contained, but fire bosses have yet to set a target for
                        full containment.
                        -The Cramer fire in the Salmon-Challis National Forest was 80
                        percent contained and fire bosses expected full containment of the
                        5,600-acre blaze by Thursday. Two firefighters were recovering from
                        injuries suffered earlier in the week on the fire that claimed the
                        lives of two smoke jumpers last week.
                        -Nearly 500 firefighters had the 4,000-acre Slims fire burning
                        35 miles east of Grangeville only 20 percent contained. A national
                        fire management team has been requested. Crews were trying to
                        protect the Horse Creek area southwest of the fire where ecological
                        research has been conducted for a number of years.
                        -The Crystal Creek fire on the Salmon-Challis National Forest
                        about 18 miles north of Stanley remained at just over 1,300 acres,
                        and limited manpower had it 75 percent contained.
                        -The Frog Pond fire north of Salmon was burning on the Idaho
                        side of the Continental Divide at about 2,100 acres. It was being
                        fought in conjunction with a bigger fire on the Montana side of the
                        Divide.
                        -Over 250 firefighters remained on the lines around the Hunt
                        Creek fire that continued to burn actively burning on the west side
                        of Priest Lake in the Idaho Panhandle. Although the fire was 25
                        percent contained at 432 acres, fire bosses expected full
                        containment by week's end.

                        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          July 31st evening update

                          MOSCOW, Idaho (AP) - A northern Idaho wildfire destroyed four
                          homes and damaged two others as hot temperatures, low humidity and
                          increasing winds fed flames throughout the state.
                          Firefighters quickly contained the 200-acre blaze near Viola,
                          Idaho. It started about 1 p.m. but was fully contained by 10 p.m.
                          The cause has not been determined.
                          "I came out of my house, and there was a roar - and the rest is
                          history," said Dean Panttaja, who lost his home in the blaze.
                          Dee Acuff said her cedar home was devoured in what seemed to be
                          a matter of moments.
                          "There was fire on both sides of our driveway," she said.
                          Tanker planes from Missoula and Grangeville swept in to drop
                          water and retardant. Three helicopters dipped buckets into farm
                          ponds and doused the flames.
                          "I was in Moscow and a friend called me and said there's a fire
                          out our way," said Ann Armstrong, who arrived home to find her
                          husband, Bruce, on top of their house watering down the roof with a
                          hose.
                          At Rockin' Heart Ranch farther east along the Rock Creek Road,
                          owners Loren and Nancy Wight evacuated 15 Arabian show horses with
                          the help of neighbors and friends.
                          In addition to local and rural fire departments, area farmers,
                          ranchers and loggers stormed into the area with full water tanks
                          and heavy equipment.
                          "This was a priority fire," said Linda McFaddan of the Coeur
                          d'Alene Interagency Dispatch Center.
                          Elsewhere in Idaho, two new fires flared just as firefighters
                          were close to containing some that have been burning for weeks.
                          The new fires include:
                          -Toboggan fire, Idaho Panhandle National Forest. This fire is
                          burning on 200 acres 12 miles north of Wallace. The fire was
                          burning freely with 87 firefighters on the scene. The fire was
                          exhibiting extreme behavior with flames rushing through tree
                          crowns.
                          -Shasta fire, Nez Perce National Forest. The fire was burning on
                          139 acres 50 miles northeast of Grangeville. The fire also was
                          burning freely and eight firefighters were monitoring the blaze.
                          Continuing fires in Idaho include:
                          -Oxkiller fire, Caribou-Targhee National Forest. The fire was
                          burning on 474 acres 3 miles east of Franklin in southeastern
                          Idaho. The fire was 90 percent contained and estimated to be fully
                          contained by Thursday. More than 110 firefighters were battling the
                          blaze.
                          -Black Frog Complex: Burning on 7,500 acres 32 miles north of
                          Salmon, the fire is 35 percent contained with 819 firefighters
                          working on the fire lines. Higher temperatures, lower humidity and
                          increased winds have increased fire activity. Defenses have been
                          set up around 75 homes and one commercial building. Highway 93 is
                          open with a pilot car from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.
                          -Hot Creek fire, Boise National forest. The fire is burning on
                          23,761 acres about three miles west of Atlanta. It was 40 percent
                          contained with 814 firefighters on the ground assisted by nine
                          helicopters. The Hot Creek fire remained the state's largest blaze.
                          Cabin evacuations and structure defenses remain in place. There is
                          no estimated containment date.
                          -Cramer fire, Salmon-Challis National Forest. The fire was
                          burning on 5,614 acres of timberland. It was 90 percent contained
                          with 414 firefighters on the fire line. Fire behavior was minimal
                          and full containment is expected by Thursday.

                          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            August 4th

                            (Boise-AP) -- Firefighters on the Hot Creek fire near Atlanta
                            are making progress on Idaho's largest wildfire. It's burning on
                            more than 26-thousand acres in the backcountry 55 miles northeast
                            of Boise.
                            Rain showers caused mudslides and temporarily trapped a number
                            of firefighters yesterday. But today they returned to the lines and
                            managed to achieve 60 percent containment.
                            All roads to Atlanta are still closed. Residents of Atlanta may
                            travel with an escort.
                            Including the Hot Creek fire, six other wildfires were burning
                            in Idaho on today for a total of 38-thousand acres. Much of Idaho's
                            public lands remained under fire restrictions, especially regarding
                            campfires and cigarette smoking.
                            ---
                            Also in west-central Idaho:
                            - The North Fork Lick fire on the Payette National Forest was
                            burning on 625 acres and was 20 percent contained. The fire is 18
                            miles northeast of McCall. Minimal fire activity was reported
                            today.
                            ---
                            Here's a look at the fires in northern Idaho:
                            - The Slims fire on Nez Perce National Forest was burning 8,400
                            acres and was 20 percent contained. The fire is 35 miles east of
                            Grangeville. Favorable weather has limited fire spread. Crews were
                            securing the west side of the Meadow Creek drainage. Full
                            containment is expected by August 20th.
                            - The Shasta fire on the Nez Perce National Forest was burning
                            on 325 acres. The fire is burning 50 miles northeast of Grangeville
                            and was being monitored. The assigned fire management team was
                            expected to disband Tuesday.
                            - The Toboggan fire on the Idaho Panhandle National Forest was
                            burning about 318 acres and was 50 percent contained. This fire is
                            12 miles northeast of Wallace. Full containment is expected by
                            Wednesday.
                            ---
                            Here's a look at the wildfires burning in Central Idaho:
                            - The Crystal Creek fire on the Salmon-Challis National Forest
                            was burning 1,319 acres at 90 percent contained. The fire is 18
                            miles north and northwest of Stanley. No new information was
                            reported on this fire today.
                            - The Lost Packer Complex on Salmon-Challis National Forest was
                            burning freely on 625 acres while fire managers monitored its
                            progress. Minimal fire behavior was observed today. This fire
                            complex is 36 miles northwest of Salmon.

                            (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              8/6

                              DUBOIS, Idaho (AP) - A new large rangefire lit up the skies of
                              eastern Idaho Wednesday night, causing the evacuation of a local
                              dude ranch.
                              The Deep Fire was burning about ten to 15 miles west of Dubois
                              and five miles south of the Montana state line.
                              The blaze began as a 500-acre brush fire at noon when the winds
                              picked up and spread it to an estimated 23,000 acres by 8 p.m.,
                              Bureau of Land Management Fire information officer David Howell
                              said.
                              Thirteen engines and about 70 firefighters were trying to take
                              advantage of dying winds overnight to halt the fire's progress.
                              The fire is burning in rangeland, mostly sage and grass, but
                              Howell said it has the potential to burn into timber. A Type-II
                              firefighting team is expected to begin arriving Thursday.
                              Meanwhile Wednesday, a wildfire burning near Elk City calmed
                              Wednesday with favorable weather. But environmentalists were
                              calling on fire crews to stop using heavy equipment to cut
                              containment lines.
                              The 8,920-acre Slims fire in north-central Idaho was slowed by
                              rain and was burning only within its perimeter. It is about 6 miles
                              away from Elk City and its 140 residents.
                              "It is not moving in any direction. It hasn't in several
                              days," Forest Service spokeswoman Tricia Humpherys said.
                              Gary Macfarlane of the Friends of the Clearwater group
                              complained that fire lines being constructed with heavy equipment
                              could cause environmental damage in the Meadow Creek roadless area,
                              which is proposed for wilderness protection.
                              He said the work could harm water quality in Meadow Creek, where
                              wild steelhead spawn, and cause visual scars to the land.
                              "If there is any place on the Nez Perce National Forest they
                              should be using their minimum-impact suppression techniques, it
                              needs to be in the Meadow Creek roadless area," he said.
                              He contends the fire should not be fought, but managed like the
                              smaller fires in the wilderness area.
                              "If the fire were to come up out of Meadow Creek we would need
                              that fire line to contain it and keep the fire out of Elk City,"
                              Humpherys replied.
                              More than 800 firefighters were working on the blaze. It was 35
                              percent contained with full containment predicted on Aug. 20. Cost
                              was estimated at $7.4 million dollars.
                              On other Idaho fires, the Hot Creek fire, Idaho's largest
                              wildfire so far this season, was held at 26,560 acres Wednesday and
                              firefighters were making better than expected progress.
                              Estimated full containment was moved up to Thursday evening
                              after fire bosses reported the fire was 90 percent contained
                              Wednesday night.
                              After a one-day delay, crews will begin blasting debris dams in
                              the Middle Fork of the Boise River Thursday between Weatherby's Air
                              Strip and Queen's River.
                              The Middle Fork Road was flooded last weekend when mudslides
                              changed the flow of the river. Heavy equipment will begin moving
                              earth and debris after the river is returned to its normal channel.
                              More than 540 firefighters were battling the blaze. Structure
                              protection remained in place for 80 residences and 10 commercial
                              properties.
                              The North Fork Lick fire on the Payette National Forest
                              continued to burn 625 acres and was 35 percent contained Wednesday.
                              Firefighters were expected to continue to secure fire lines on
                              the east side of the fire with the help of helicopter water drops.
                              On the south side of the fire, crews were be mopping up hot spots.
                              The fire is 18 miles northeast of McCall with 290 firefighters
                              assigned.

                              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                              Comment

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