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  • Western Wildfire Roundup

    PHOENIX (AP) - A rampaging 2,000-acre wildfire prompted the
    evacuation Monday of as many as 700 people on the Fort Apache
    Indian Reservation in eastern Arizona, authorities said.
    An Indian Health Service hospital was among the buildings
    evacuated. Only a crew of eight was left to staff an emergency
    room. Officials said more evacuations were possible.
    The evacuation was ordered Monday afternoon after the blaze
    crossed a trigger point near two subdivisions 5 miles north of
    Whiteriver, said Chadeen Palmer, a spokeswoman for the crew
    fighting the fire.
    The fire was burning out of control Monday evening. It had been
    sparked by lightning Sunday in juniper and ponderosa pines east of
    an area burned by last summer's huge Rodeo-Chediski fire.
    The Rodeo-Chediski fire burned 469,000 acres, destroyed 491
    homes and forced 30,000 people from their homes. On the
    reservation, the fire charred sacred Apache sites and damaged the
    White Mountain Apache Tribe's timber industry, which provides 60
    percent of the tribe's income.
    Elsewhere Monday, a fire burning on densely timbered slopes near
    Yakima in south-central Washington was holding steady at about
    2,000 acres.
    Residents who had to leave 20 homes Friday, the day the fire
    began, were allowed to return. But officials said residents of
    another 150 homes remained on notice that they might have to
    evacuate.
    In western Wyoming, a 23-mile section of U.S. 26-89, a heavily
    traveled route to Jackson Hole, was reopened Monday after smoke
    from a wildfire lifted.
    The route through the Snake River Canyon was closed during the
    weekend because of an 1,100-acre wildfire that erupted Saturday
    between Alpine and Hoback Junction.
    Nearby Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks were not
    affected but officials closed three Bridger-Teton National Forest
    campgrounds and suspended fishing and rafting on the Snake River
    between Hoback Junction and Alpine because of smoke.
    In southern Arizona, a fire that destroyed more than 300 homes
    and cabins on Mount Lemmon in mid-June was declared 90 percent
    contained Monday. It had blackened 84,750 acres and crews expected
    to have it fully contained on Tuesday.
    A day-old fire in Montana, about 10 to 15 miles east of Helena,
    forced the evacuation of a rural subdivision and had blackened 700
    acres by Monday.
    Nine residents of about 17 homes in the subdivision near the
    small town of York were still waiting to return Monday, officials
    said. York had no electricity and service was not likely to be
    restored for a few days, said Lewis and Clark County emergency
    services coordinator Paul Spengler.
    About 20 miles east of Eugene, Ore., two campgrounds were
    evacuated because of a 500-acre blaze in the Willamette National
    Forest, said David Widmark of the Northwest Interagency
    Coordination Center. The fire, which started Sunday, also
    threatened five homes in the area but they had not yet been
    evacuated.
    Fires also were active in Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico and Utah,
    the National Interagency Fire Center reported. So far this year,
    wildfires have blackened just over 1 million acres, compared to 3.2
    million at this same time last year, the center said Monday.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov


    YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) - A dangerous wildfire 20 miles west of here
    held steady at about 2,000 acres on Monday and residents who had to
    leave 20 homes last Friday were allowed to return, fire officials
    said.
    About 500 firefighters had contained some 30 percent of the
    Middle Fork wildfire near Tampico, fire spokesman Dale Warriner
    said. No structures have burned, he said.
    The fire is burning in densely timbered slopes in the Cascade
    Range. It is the most dangerous of several Washington state
    wildfires that cover some 25,000 acres, officials said. No injuries
    have been reported in any of the fires.
    Residents of another 150 homes in the area remained on notice
    that they might have to evacuate, Warriner said.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    APTV 07-14-03 2147EDT
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  • #2
    July 17th

    SUMMERHAVEN, Ariz. (AP) - Catherine Westervelt wouldn't turn her
    eyes away from the pile of rubble that had been a family treasure.
    Staring at ashy remnants and bits of misshapen metal, she could
    muster only a halting whisper as she tried to talk about the
    vacation cabin, built by her father more than 30 years ago.
    "It's like losing a family," Westervelt said, beginning to
    cry. "It was my dad's. It was his and we lost him three years ago.
    It's like losing him all over again because this was the last thing
    of his we had."
    Westervelt was among dozens of property owners who returned to
    Summerhaven on Thursday, a month after a wildfire chased them away
    before ravaging the mountaintop vacation hamlet north of Tucson.
    The 84,750-acre blaze was contained Tuesday.
    Residents found a charred landscape where trees were reduced to
    barren trunks and some homes were burned to their foundations while
    others remained untouched.
    Residents whose homes were spared are free to stay as long as
    they want. No decision has been made on when the public will be
    allowed up the mountain.
    "It's a kick in the head," said Westervelt's husband, Richard.
    He was watering two apple trees - the only things left standing on
    the property - using a tube running from a barrel in the back of
    his pickup.
    The fire broke out June 17 on Mount Lemmon, forcing property
    owners to flee Summerhaven and surrounding subdivisions. It tore
    through the community two days later, as high winds drove flames
    through pine forest ravaged by drought and tree-killing beetles.
    A total of 322 homes and cabins, seven businesses and four other
    buildings were lost during the initial surge and another run
    earlier this month. The fire was caused by people, and remains
    under investigation.
    As its name suggests, Summerhaven has been an oasis in the pines
    6,000 feet above Tucson, near the summit of 9,150-foot Mount
    Lemmon. It's been a place to escape from triple-digit heat in the
    summer and to throw snowballs or ski in the winter.
    Summerhaven has about 100 year-round residents, but its
    population swells in the summer and on weekends as people head to
    cabins, second homes and campgrounds.
    Phil Mack, the owner of the Mount Lemmon General Store and Gift
    Shop, which was destroyed, said he expects many people to rebuild.
    "It's still going to be 25 to 30 degrees cooler than in town
    and we're still going to have snow in the winter," said Mack, who
    lived above his store. "Tucsonans are going to want to bring their
    kids up to play in the snow and we'll be selling sleds and gloves
    again."
    As Summerhaven residents returned, firefighters across the West
    continued their battles in what has been a mild fire season
    overall. The National Interagency Fire Center reported Thursday
    that 1.12 million acres of forest have burned so far this season,
    compared to a 10-year, year-to-date average of 1.89 million acres.
    In Wyoming, 15 Boy Scouts and their leaders were plucked by
    helicopter from the Shoshone National Forest backcountry, where
    they had been cut off when authorities closed a trail because of a
    rapidly expanding wildfire. The 1,000-acre fire was burning away
    from the Scouts, who had been stranded but not in danger, fire
    managers said.
    In California, about 760 firefighters worked to contain a
    wildfire that had burned 7,000 acres of steep, hilly brush near the
    Riverside-San Diego county line. About 600 people were evacuated
    from a Boy Scout summer camp as a precaution, and an undetermined
    number of residents were forced from their homes.
    Firefighters also continued to battle spot fires in the
    north-central Washington town of Okanogan, where a wind-whipped
    fire destroyed six houses and heavily damaged two others Wednesday.
    Dozens of other houses were threatened before firefighters, aided
    by aircraft dropping retardant, contained the 350-acre fire,
    Okanogan County Sheriff Frank Rogers said.
    Fires in Colorado closed Mesa Verde National Park, although
    officials said its ancient ruins did not appear to be threatened.
    Major wildfires also were reported in Idaho, Montana, New
    Mexico, Oregon and Utah.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

    Comment


    • #3
      7/21

      SAN LUIS OBISPO, Calif. (AP) - A wildfire destroyed a house and
      four outbuildings and forced about 250 people to flee as it roared
      across rolling, oak-studded hills.
      The blaze was 60 percent contained Monday after charring 1,500
      acres near the community of Santa Margarita, said California
      Department of Forestry dispatcher Corrin Clark.
      About 200 other homes and 50 outbuildings had been threatened as
      high temperatures and wind help spot fires erupt, she said. The
      blaze was located in brushy cattle country about 200 miles north of
      Los Angeles. Full containment was expected Tuesday.
      The fire, reported Sunday afternoon, was caused by a spark from
      an off-road vehicle, and the driver was cited for having a modified
      exhaust system, said Nena Portillo of the California Department of
      Forestry.
      Farther south, a fire that charred more than 18,000 acres of
      brush in eastern San Diego County was 50 percent contained Monday,
      fire officials said. The fire was started by lightning on July 16.
      Full containment is expected Wednesday.
      In Montana, hundreds of firefighters battled range fires that
      have burned across 105,000 acres of the rugged Missouri River
      Breaks of the northcentral part of the state.
      About 50 people were evacuated from ranches as the fire
      blackened stands of ponderosa pine and charred pastures and
      hayfields. But calmer, cooler weather appeared to give fire crews a
      break.
      Elsewhere, a wildfire burned about 1,000 acres of timber and
      grasslands in eastern Washington state, destroying 14 vehicles and
      some outbuildings. The fire was located about five miles southwest
      of Cheney, Wash.
      The cause of the blaze, which began Sunday afternoon, was not
      known.
      It was one of several wildfires in central and eastern
      Washington. Temperatures were expected to reach as high as 103
      degrees in the eastern part of the state on Monday. No injuries
      were reported at any of the fires.
      Meanwhile, in Colorado, park officials reopened Mesa Verde
      National Park on Monday for the first time since six days, even
      though firefighters were still battling a 2,600-acre wildfire that
      was 10 percent contained.
      All the park's archaeological features were reopening, but a
      campground and shops about four miles inside the park's main
      entrance remain closed because firefighting operations are based
      there, spokeswoman Kathy Crepinsek said.
      In eastern Arizona, rain had calmed the 22,550-acre wildfire on
      the Fort Apache Indian Reservation, where hundreds of residents
      were evacuated for part of last week. No homes were damaged and
      none were threatened Monday, officials said.
      That fire was 65 percent contained Monday and firefighters hope
      to have it fully contained by Wednesday, said Kami Goklish, a
      spokeswoman for the team fighting the fire.
      Fires also were active Monday in Idaho, New Mexico, Nevada,
      Oregon, Utah and Wyoming, the National Interagency Fire Center
      said.
      ---
      On the Net:
      Nat'l Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/

      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment


      • #4
        7/22

        BRUSETT, Montana (AP) - Rising temperatures and wind Tuesday
        threatened to revive a cluster of range fires that had burned
        105,000 acres (42,493 hectares) of north-central Montana,
        threatening isolated farm and ranch homes.
        Hundreds of firefighters had so far succeeded in protecting
        buildings, including the farm complex where a notorious anti-U.S.
        government group holed up in a 1996 confrontation with federal
        agents.
        However, about 50 people had been evacuated as the fire
        blackened stands of ponderosa pine and charred pastures and
        hayfields.
        The fires made little progress Monday, when the high was only in
        the 80s (27 degrees Celsius) , but temperatures were headed into
        the 90s (32 degrees Celsius) Tuesday, McKelvey said.
        The fires were south of the Missouri River on or near a national
        wildlife refuge.
        "Beyond a quarter of a mile, there's scorched land, scorched
        hayfields and scorched trees," said Brenda Pluhar, whose father's
        ranch sits in the path of the fire. "It's just devastating
        watching the scenery go up in smoke."
        Calmer weather on Monday had helped fire crews in northwestern
        Montana, where about 100 homes were evacuated in the path of a
        4,600-acre (1,860-hectare) fire just outside Glacier National Park.
        Elsewhere, officials said a fire blaze that had charred 1,200
        acres (485- hectares) near the community of Santa Margarita was 80
        percent contained Tuesday, state forestry officials said.
        In Wyoming, firefighters worked Tuesday to protect six homes
        about a mile from a 1,300-acre (526-hectare) blaze in Johnson
        County and three ranches about a half-mile from the flames.
        Large fires also were active Tuesday in Arizona, Colorado,
        Idaho, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah and
        Washington, the National Interagency Fire Center said.
        ---
        On the Net:
        National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/

        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #5
          7/23, A sad day.....

          BOISE, Idaho (AP) - Two firefighters were overrun by flames and
          killed soon after they were dropped by helicopter to battle a
          fast-moving blaze in a national forest in central Idaho, officials
          said Wednesday.
          The fire in the Salmon-Challis National Forest about 130 miles
          south of Missoula, Mont., was caused by lightning and first
          reported Sunday night. Hot temperatures and wind blew it up from
          120 acres to about 1,000 acres Tuesday night, officials said.
          Killed were Jeff Allen, 23, of Salmon, and Shane Heath, 22, of
          Boise. Allen became a seasonal firefighter in 1999. Heath, a Boise
          State University student, had been a wildland firefighter for four
          years.
          U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Erin O'Connor said the deaths
          were under investigation.
          Allen and Heath were the eighth and ninth firefighters to die
          since February nationwide, said Alan Hoffmeister, a spokesman for
          the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise. Only one of the
          previous deaths was by fire, while the others were helicopter
          crashes and accidents.
          The firefighters had just rappelled to the ground when they were
          overtaken by flames.
          All firefighters were pulled from the blaze and an investigation
          of the deaths was underway. A federal forest fire management team
          was sent to the fire, but it was unclear when the fight to contain
          the blaze would resume.
          "Firefighter safety is the number one priority," Forest
          Supervisor George Matejko said Wednesday. "The stand-down ensures
          that those involved on the fire have an opportunity to deal with
          the impact of the tragedy."
          The firefighters were part of a "helitack" crew. Such teams
          travel by helicopter to provide initial response to wildland fires,
          sometimes dropping crew members on the ground to battle small
          blazes before they grow into large fires. The crews are deployed to
          remote, steep and extremely smoky environments.
          Elsewhere in the West, neighbors armed with water tanks on their
          truck beds pitched in to help protect each others' homes as a
          cluster of range fires swept across more than 117,000 acres in
          north-central Montana.
          Residents have built fire lines, watered down yards and helped
          neighbors pack up valuable belongings since the fires erupted last
          week.
          Six to eight outbuildings burned overnight and four head of
          cattle were confirmed dead, the first confirmed cattle losses.
          Temperatures rose Wednesday and hundreds of firefighters protected
          up to 75 buildings, including the farm complex where the
          anti-government Montana Freemen holed up in a 1996 confrontation
          with federal agents.
          Some residents blamed the Bureau of Land Management for one
          fire, and criticized the interagency management team that was
          directing more than 400 firefighters in the effort to corral the
          fires.
          The fire started on bureau land and could have been stopped at
          20 acres, but bureau authorities would not allow residents to help
          suppress it, said Ross Childers, who had two ranches in danger.
          Trudie Olson, public affairs director for the bureau in
          Billings, said that the bureau has aggressively attacked all new
          fires when spotted.
          In northern Wyoming, evacuations were ordered after a wildfire
          just outside the Bighorn National Forest moved to within a
          half-mile of eight mountain homes, bureau spokeswoman Lesley
          Collins said.
          The blaze had grown to 1,500 acres and was moving northwest.
          "With the rough terrain and topography and lack of resources,
          they're just having a hard time trying to contain it," she said.
          About 250 firefighters were battling the fire, which was started
          by lightning Saturday about 20 miles southwest of Buffalo, Wyo.
          Wildfires this year have charred some 1.46 million acres
          nationwide. That remains a quieter-than-average wildfire season.
          Other states with large fires included Arizona, California,
          Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, South Dakota, Utah
          and Washington.
          ---
          On the Net:
          National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment


          • #6
            July 24th

            By COURTNEY LOWERY
            Associated Press Writer
            WEST GLACIER, Montana (AP) - Several thousand people streamed
            out of Glacier National Park after a wildfire burned into the
            western half of the park and officials worried that conditions were
            ripe for more fires to break out.
            Wildfires have prompted officials to close most of the western
            half of Glacier - widely considered one of the crown jewels of the
            national park system. The park covers more than 1 million acres in
            northwest Montana near the Canadian border and is home to some of
            the most spectacular mountain views in the country.
            "The purpose of the evacuation is to make sure the fire doesn't
            get behind people and they don't have a way to get out of the
            park," park information officer Punky Moore said Thursday.
            Park spokeswoman Amy Vanderbilt said several thousand people
            were evacuated, including concession employees, landowners, campers
            and lodge guests.
            Park officials also ordered the evacuation of a valley on the
            eastern edge of the park because of "red flag" fire warnings
            stemming from dry conditions, high wind and low humidity.
            Officials said two fires posed the biggest threat, including one
            that swelled to at least 6,000 acres (2,400 hectares) by Thursday
            morning and a second estimated at nearly 2,000 acres (800
            hectares), officials said. The smaller blaze prompted Thursday's
            evacuations in the park's western half.
            In Idaho, residents mourned the deaths of Jeff Allen, 24, and
            Shane Heath, 22, who were overrun by flames after they had rappeled
            to the ground to fight a blaze in the Salmon-Challis National
            Forest.
            The fire, about 130 miles (209 kilometers) south of Missoula,
            was caused by lightning and first reported Sunday. Hot temperatures
            and wind blew it up from 120 acres (48 hectares) to about 1,000
            acres (400 hectares), officials said.
            "The dryness of the trees and other shrubs, the high
            temperatures of over 100 degrees (38 Celsius) for weeks, the
            relative humidity down to around 16 percent - all those factors
            contribute to very extreme fire behavior," U.S. Forest Service
            spokeswoman Erin O'Connor said.
            Another Idaho blaze grew to 14,000 acres (5,600 hectares) in the
            Boise National Forest and was about 8 miles (13 kilometers) away
            from the small town of Atlanta on Thursday. Isolated summer cabins
            were evacuated, and up to 80 residences are considered threatened.
            A 122,000-acre (48,800-hectare) cluster of fires in eastern
            Montana remained the biggest in the state, but officials said they
            were close to containing them.
            The National Interagency Fire Center said there were 45 large
            fires burning in the West, with 376,564 acres (150,625 hectares) of
            active wildfires. Other states with large fires included Arizona,
            California, Colorado, New Mexico, Nevada, Oklahoma, Oregon, South
            Dakota, Utah, Washington and Wyoming.
            ---
            On the Net:
            National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

            Comment


            • #7
              July 27th

              WEST GLACIER, Mont. (AP) - Fire officials were positioning
              manpower and equipment to battle an approaching wildfire with fire,
              but hoped they won't be forced to light a 5,000-acre burnout sooner
              than planned because of changing weather in Glacier National Park.
              Dangerous though it may be, the strategy could pinch off the
              threat to hundreds of houses, cabins and businesses. And there may
              be no other choice, fire commanders said Sunday.
              "When the weather conditions are right and we have the
              equipment and people and resources to do the burn, that's what
              we'll do," said information officer Pete Buist. "The exception is
              if the fire starts to move quickly. Then we will have to do the
              burn quickly."
              Officials said the burnout could be ignited as early as Monday
              but they hoped to wait until Tuesday.
              Only essential personnel remained at the park's headquarters in
              West Glacier and much of the western half of the park, where at
              least three separate fires were burning, is closed during what
              normally is the height of the tourist season.
              Late Sunday, finger fires were flaring on the western portion of
              a 9,300-acre fire and it was "watch out time," said Dawn LeFleur,
              a fire information officer.
              She said forecasts call for more hot weather Monday with a front
              moving south out of Canada, suggesting increasing wind.
              Some limited burnouts, many aimed at protecting buildings, were
              ignited Sunday.
              Incident commander Joe Stam said his team was proceeding very
              deliberately with burnouts, which could take an unexpected turn and
              do more harm than good.
              That concerns Apgar resident Monica Jungster.
              "I'm kind of cringing right now," she told a community meeting
              Sunday. "My question is, `Is it dangerous to use this
              (backfire)?"'
              Stam told Jungster after the meeting that burnout planners are
              nationally renowned experts and every precaution will be taken.
              "It's not something we take lightly," Stam said. "We're
              sweating bullets when we say, 'Go ahead and light."'
              The blaze was one of three major blazes in and around the park
              that had blackened 44,500 acres by Sunday.
              An even larger blaze had burned 18,900 acres in the northwest
              corner of Glacier, just six miles south of the Canadian border. The
              fire destroyed five dwellings, damaged another and burned 19
              outbuildings. About 100 homes and cabins were still threatened.
              A third wildfire has burned 16,300 acres inside the park in a
              remote area north of Going-to-the-Sun Road.
              Large fires were also burning in other states, including
              Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, New Mexico, Oregon, South
              Dakota, Utah, Washington and Wyoming, the National Interagency Fire
              Center reported.
              Wildfires have turned deadly in Arizona, where a helicopter
              crash Saturday killed one firefighter and the pilot. Another
              helicopter pilot died Friday in Washington. In Idaho, two
              firefighters were killed earlier in the week.
              ---
              On the Net:
              Nat'l Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

              Comment


              • #8
                7/28 roundup

                A look at wildfires around the West:
                Arizona: No major fires
                California: A 4,300-acre fire in rural Riverside County that
                destroyed a home and five outbuildings was 80 percent contained. A
                1,002-acre fire that burned into Sequoia National Forest in Kern
                County was 95 percent contained. Both were expected to be fully
                surrounded by evening.
                Colorado: Wildfires were burning on more than 11,880 acres
                Monday, but none were considered a major threat to homes or other
                structures. A 360-acre fire 25 miles southeast of Meeker threatened
                about a dozen cabins and a 2,750-acre fire in Mesa Verde National
                Park remained 35 percent contained.
                Idaho: A half dozen large wildfires continued to burn on a
                combined 37,000 acres. The Hot Creek fire is the largest blaze in
                the state, burning on 19,489 acres northeast of Boise. New
                restrictions on smoking and campfires were being imposed in western
                and central Idaho.
                Montana: Fire officials said they might drop incendiary devices
                from the air to ignite a backburn in front of a 9,310-acre fire
                near Glacier National Park to protect park headquarters and nearby
                homes and businesses. Only essential personnel remain at the park's
                headquarters in West Glacier, and some of Glacier's western half is
                closed during what normally is the height of the tourist season.
                Nevada: No major fires
                New Mexico: Some crews have been released from the Spruce Fire
                Complex in the Gila National Forest of southwestern New Mexico. The
                9,452-acre fire was 50 percent contained Monday. The 18,505-acre
                Turnbo Fire in the Gila has grown little because of higher
                humidity.
                Oregon: Lightning started five small wildfires overnight in the
                Umpqua National Forest.
                Utah: The Black Rock fire has burned 482 acres and was 50
                percent contained. The fire is 30 miles west of Spanish Fork.
                Utah's largest wildfire of the season, the Bulldog fire, 17 miles
                north of Ticaboo in the Henry Mountains, has burned 31,738 acres
                and was 85 percent contained.
                Washington: More than 1,400 firefighters were battling the
                68,539-acre Farewell Creek fire, burning in the Pasayten Wilderness
                in north-central Washington. It was about 35 percent contained on
                Monday. About 60 miles southeast, the 2,233-acre McGinnis Flats
                wildfire on the Colville Indian Reservation was roughly 70 percent
                contained. A helicopter dropping water on that fire crashed on
                Friday, killing the pilot.
                Wyoming: The 370-acre Ditch Creek fire in northern Wyoming was
                50 percent contained on Monday, with full containment expected
                Thursday. In the mountains northwest of Cody, the Deep Lake fire is
                55 percent contained.



                (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  Western RoundUp 2006

                  CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - A wind-whipped wildfire threatened
                  hundreds of homes under an evacuation order south of Casper, and
                  firefighters wearily eyed a Wednesday forecast that could create
                  conditions for the fire to spread.
                  Gov. Dave Freudenthal declared a state of emergency as the blaze
                  covered 7,000 acres, or 11 square miles. Officials said winds
                  forced firefighters to pull back in places because embers were
                  blowing across fire lines and creating spot fires behind
                  firefighters.
                  "The weather report isn't favorable for tomorrow," said State
                  Forester Bill Crasper Tuesday night. Temperatures were predicted in
                  the 90s again Wednesday, and isolated thunderstorms were possible.
                  The fire was about five miles south of Casper - Wyoming's
                  second-largest city, near the center of the state. But it was
                  moving southeast, away from the city, toward scattered rural
                  subdivisions.
                  Crapser estimated about 225 firefighters were on the fire, but
                  said he expected numbers to go up significantly as more crews are
                  pulled from other fires elsewhere.
                  "We're still calling for resources all around the country. With
                  the fire activity going on about the country, resources are hard to
                  come by," Crapser said.
                  Elsewhere, cooler air helped firefighters in southern California
                  advance on a blaze that charred about 7½ square miles and
                  temporarily cut power in northern Los Angeles County on Sunday.
                  Germain Aguilara, spokesman for the Los Angeles County Fire
                  Department, said they hoped to have the fire fully contained by
                  Wednesday night.
                  "The crew keeps advancing on it," Aguilara said. "As long as
                  the wind out there is not erratic, that will help us make
                  progress."
                  In Washington state, about 550 Army soldiers were undergoing
                  basic fire training before being dispatched in 20-person crews to
                  help on a 141-square-mile wildfire in the Okanogan and Wenatchee
                  national forests.
                  In Idaho, a blaze in the Salmon-Challis National Forest, 7 miles
                  north of Stanley, had grown to more than 25 square miles and was
                  threatening vacation cabins.
                  In Montana, a 50-square-mile fire in the northwestern part of
                  the state near the Canadian border showed little activity, and was
                  75 percent contained. Meanwhile, residents of nine homes in Ravalli
                  County were asked to be prepared to leave as a fire southeast of
                  Lewis and Clark Caverns State Park grew to less than a square mile.
                  Lightning in northern Nevada also started 10 brush fires in Elko
                  County along a 100-mile stretch from Interstate 80 to near the
                  Idaho line, authorities said Tuesday. Five firefighters were
                  treated after their truck overturned, but the most serious injury
                  was a broken arm, authorities said.
                  ---
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                  • #10
                    August 21st summary

                    CASPER, Wyo. (AP) - The last evacuation orders have been lifted
                    for hundreds of residents and firefighters were being sent home
                    Monday after reaching 85 percent containment of a wildfire south of
                    Casper.
                    The fire had covered more than 11,700 acres, or about 18 square
                    miles, since lightning started it Aug. 14.
                    Hundreds of homes were evacuated last week on Casper Mountain,
                    in central Wyoming about 5 miles south of Casper. Seven cabins, a
                    barn and two outbuildings were burned, officials said.
                    Only about 100 firefighters were still working on the fire
                    Monday, down from more than 500 last week.
                    Fire crews battled several large blazes Monday in north-central
                    Washington state, including one threatening a remote community at
                    the north end of Lake Chelan.
                    The fire was burning in steep, dangerous terrain about 2 miles
                    from Stehekin, which is reachable only by boat, air, horse or on
                    foot. The fire has blackened more than seven square miles, or 4,738
                    acres. It was 50 percent contained Monday.
                    The largest fire in Washington has blackened nearly 190 square
                    miles of forest between the north-central towns of Winthrop and
                    Conconully. Firefighters estimated the fire at 121,596 acres.
                    The National Interagency Fire Center reported as many as eight
                    major fires burning across Idaho, on more than 415 square miles.
                    They included at least four new fires that started Monday in
                    southwestern Idaho, on U.S. Forest Service and Bureau of Land
                    Management territory.
                    A group of four wildfires in West Texas was 50 percent contained
                    Monday after charring about 12 square miles since Friday night,
                    said Laura Polant, a spokeswoman for the Texas Forest Service.
                    Crews battled 104 degree temperatures and low humidity.
                    No injuries or deaths have been reported in the fires near
                    Caddo, Texas, but one hunting cabin was burned. Twelve homes
                    threatened by the fires were saved, Polant said.
                    So far this year, wildfires have charred 6.8 million acres, or
                    nearly 11,000 square miles, according to the National Interagency
                    Fire Center in Boise, Idaho. By this same date last year, wildfires
                    had covered 6.7 million acres.
                    ---
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                    Comment


                    • #11
                      August 23rd

                      DAYTON, Washington (AP) - Red flag warnings were posted for wide
                      areas of the northwestern United States, indicating extreme fire
                      danger as crews battled spreading wildfires.
                      Washington Governor Chris Gregoire declared a statewide wildfire
                      emergency Wednesday, citing the major fires already burning and the
                      potential for more blazes as weather forecasters predicted
                      thunderstorms, high wind and low humidity.
                      "It's very rugged terrain," Gregoire said after a helicopter
                      tour of the state's largest fire, which had burned across 200
                      square miles (512 square kilometers). "The firefighters go in and
                      put up a line, and the fire will jump a mile over the line. ...
                      We're just hoping now the weather cooperates."
                      The declaration allows state agencies to spend money and
                      resources to help local jurisdictions fight wildfires.
                      Meanwhile, a group of wind-driven fires near Dayton in southeast
                      Washington doubled in size in about 24 hours to nearly 40 square
                      miles (102 square kilometers).
                      Thirty-five residents evacuated from a nursing home were allowed
                      to return because the smoke had cleared, and some residents of 200
                      evacuated homes also came back, said Ray Steiger, information
                      officer at the fire complex.
                      But residents of dozens of homes near the Coppei River south of
                      Waitsburg, some on pricey 5-acre (2-hectare) lots, and some people
                      living along the Tucannon River were warned to be ready to
                      evacuate.
                      Red flag warnings or fire weather watches also were posted for
                      parts of Oregon, Idaho, Montana, Nevada and Utah, the National Fire
                      Information Center said.
                      An evacuation order was issued Wednesday for 25 to 30 homes in a
                      subdivision east of Billings, Montana, as a nearby wildfire grew to
                      at least 3,300 acres (1,320 hectares), said Mary Apple, fire
                      information officer with the Billings Dispatch Center. The blaze
                      destroyed two homes, a barn and several outbuildings Tuesday.
                      The fire, fueled by timber and grass, was reported Tuesday
                      morning; the cause was not yet known.
                      In California, a fire that had burned 480 acres (192 hectares),
                      or about three-quarters of a square mile (nearly 2 square
                      kilometers), forced the closure of trails to the summit of El
                      Capitan, one of the best-known granite monuments that tower over
                      the Yosemite Valley.
                      The fire, which started Monday, was believed to have been
                      accidentally set by people. It was about 30 percent contained
                      Wednesday.
                      North of Reno, Nevada, a vehicle struck a wall during a police
                      training exercise Wednesday and sparked a 50-acre (20-hectare)
                      brush file that destroyed several vehicles and sheds.
                      In Nevada's Elko County, a week's worth of fires had blackened
                      more than 360 square miles (920 square kilometers). The largest
                      active fire burned nearly 36 square miles, including three cabins,
                      a trailer and an outbuilding.
                      So far this year, wildfires have blackened 6.8 million acres
                      (2.7 million hectares), or 10,600 square miles (27,000 square
                      kilometers), compared to 6.7 million acres (2.7 million hectares)
                      at this same time last year, the center said.
                      ---
                      On the Net:
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                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Update August 29th

                        REDLANDS, Calif. (AP) - A wildfire erupted quickly in the
                        southern San Bernardino National Forest on Tuesday, burning a home
                        and prompting the evacuation of a tiny mountain community.
                        It was one of several fires to have started in Southern
                        California this week as hot weather dried out brush and increased
                        fire danger.
                        The fire started about 3 p.m. and burned about 2,000 acres by
                        dusk, authorities said. The cause was under investigation. The
                        blaze was about 5 percent contained.
                        The community of Mountain Home Village was under a mandatory
                        evacuation order, and nearby Angelus Oaks was under a voluntary
                        evacuation, said Robin Prince, a forest spokeswoman.
                        One home and two outbuildings had burned.
                        Mountain Home Village resident Kevin Bondy said a number of
                        people were leaving. About 60 homes are in the area.
                        "You can't see (the flames) from where we're at right now,"
                        Bondy said. "It's on the other side of the ridge, but I guess it's
                        enough for them to evacuate us."
                        Nearly 200 firefighters, along with seven air tankers and three
                        water-dropping helicopters, attacked the flames as they moved north
                        into the forest about 60 miles east of Los Angeles.
                        The fire was burning near the eastern edge of the Santa Ana
                        River, about 14 miles from San Bernardino.
                        In northern Los Angeles County, firefighters contained a
                        565-acre blaze near Santa Clarita. Residents of several closed
                        streets were allowed to return home. Arson was suspected,
                        authorities said.
                        In Montana, residents of about a dozen homes were urged to
                        evacuate after an afternoon windstorm fanned a fire that had burned
                        about 18,000 acres and was 40 percent contained.
                        It made a "pretty good run" Tuesday, information officer Pat
                        Cross said. The fire was burning in national forests about 60 miles
                        north of Yellowstone National Park.
                        In Washington state, more favorable weather was helping
                        firefighters battle a huge wilderness blaze. Firefighters were
                        pulled from the lines Monday because of unsafe conditions in hot,
                        windy weather.
                        The lightning-caused fire covers about 142,326 acres in the
                        Pasayten Wilderness in the north-central part of the state. There
                        are 1,562 people battling the fire, and it is about 48 percent
                        trailed, said Bud Nelson, a spokesman for the firefighting effort.

                        APTV 08-29-06 2356EDT
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
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                        Comment


                        • #13
                          September 6th

                          HELENA, Mont. (AP) - Gov. Brian Schweitzer traveled to the
                          command post for Montana's colossal Derby Mountain wildfire
                          Wednesday as the blaze entered its third week and firefighters
                          toiling in hot, dry conditions faced still another challenge: bees.
                          The trip to the Derby Mountain camp in south-central Montana was
                          the second for Schweitzer, who was to be briefed by fire managers,
                          then take an aerial tour if the sky was clear enough. The fire that
                          started with lightning Aug. 22 has spread across 185,000 acres, or
                          289 square miles. It has burned 26 homes.
                          Other states with major fires Wednesday included Washington and
                          Nevada.
                          Officials said 45 percent of the Derby Mountain blaze was
                          contained. Containment consists of natural or constructed barriers,
                          such as bulldozer lines, that may restrict a fire's spread.
                          Information officer Joan Dickerson said the west side of the
                          fire was particularly active Wednesday, when temperatures were in
                          the mid 80s, humidity remained low and wind blew from the east.
                          Bee stings among firefighters have been occurring at the rate of
                          40 to 50 a day, said Dickerson, adding some of those stung required
                          medical attention for sensitivities.
                          "We've had a couple of our leaders taken to the hospital," she
                          said.
                          Dickerson said she had no explanation for the surge in bee
                          stings.
                          An evacuation order that applied to 265 homes remained in
                          effect, three days after it was issued. An alert for evacuation
                          readiness covered another 20 homes.
                          Smoke from the Derby Mountain fire and others triggered
                          air-quality warnings in southwestern Montana. The Department of
                          Environmental Quality said the air in Bozeman and in the area of
                          the fires was "very unhealthy" while Butte's air quality was
                          "unhealthy." Air was not healthful for sensitive groups of people
                          in Livingston, Helena, Missoula, Whitefish, Kalispell and Libby,
                          the DEQ said.
                          Smoke may linger until Friday, forecasters said.
                          "We're not sure what the weekend is going to bring," Dickerson
                          said. "We're prepping for a cold front" that could shift the
                          wind.
                          Also Wednesday, the East Boulder Mine in Sweet Grass County
                          remained closed. The mine was shut down Sunday because of the fire;
                          about 230 employees are affected, information officer Allison
                          Jackson said.
                          In Washington, a second wildfire approached the Canadian border
                          Wednesday. With a dozen large fires burning in the state, officials
                          watched for new blazes after a round of dry lightning strikes in
                          eastern Washington. In the Seattle area, outdoor burning was
                          banned.
                          Weekend lightning struck more than 80 places in Washington.
                          Sometimes days elapse before remote fires are detected.
                          More than 3,300 firefighters were assigned to the state's 10
                          largest blazes, which had burned nearly 468 square miles.
                          The Columbia complex, 40 percent contained on Wednesday, took
                          priority. It had burned 145 square miles, or 93,225 acres, near
                          Dayton in southeast Washington. Several hundred residents remained
                          evacuated, said Virgil Mink, a fire information officer for the
                          U.S. Forest Service.
                          Washington's largest burn was the Tripod complex, which had
                          moved across 163,098 acres in the north-central part of the state.
                          The fire, 56 percent contained, burned within a mile of the
                          Canadian border near Haig Mountain. Canadian crews were monitoring.
                          In Nevada, crew leaders Wednesday awaited arrival of more
                          personnel to work on fires that blackened nearly 375 square miles
                          of rangeland across the state's northeastern area during a four-day
                          span.
                          Officials reported 32 fires touched off by lightning since
                          Sunday had burned 240,000 acres. The fires included one that
                          exploded to 129,000 acres and was 10 percent contained.
                          There were no reports of human injury or damage to homes.
                          Information officer June McMillen said the fires were a threat to
                          scattered ranches and mines, and to wildlife habitat.
                          ---
                          On the Net:
                          Incident Information System: www.inciweb.org

                          (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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                          Comment


                          • #14
                            September 7th Top firefighting teams sent to battle Nevada blazes

                            By TOM GARDNER
                            Associated Press Writer
                            RENO, Nev. (AP) - A national command team and three of the top
                            firefighting teams in the country joined the battle Thursday
                            against wildfires that have blackened nearly 375 square miles of
                            rangeland the past four days, threatening ranches, mines and
                            wildlife habitat.
                            The Nevada fires are among the largest wildland blazes which
                            have blackened more than 1 million acres nationally, or 1,563
                            square miles - slightly more than the land mass of Rhode Island.
                            The national command team was set up in the Elko Convention
                            Center on Thursday and will coordinate efforts with the three elite
                            teams.
                            "I think all of our large fires are in good shape," Joe Ribar,
                            commander of the national command team, said on Thursday. "If we
                            get through today's issues, we'll be on the downhill side."
                            Those issues include temperatures in the 80s, humidity in the
                            teens and the ongoing threat of isolated thundershowers.
                            Fires touched off by dry lightning since Sunday had burned
                            240,000 acres in Nevada, including the Sheep fire 25 miles
                            northeast of Battle Mountain in Lander County, which exploded to
                            130,000-plus acres and was 20 percent contained.
                            In Elko County, the 80,000-acre Amazon fire near Tuscarora,
                            which was 25 percent contained, while the 16,700-plus-acre Deer
                            blaze near Jackpot was 90 percent contained.
                            No damage to homes or injuries were reported, but the fires
                            continued to pose a threat to scattered ranches and mines as well
                            as wildlife habitat, fire information officer June McMillen said on
                            Wednesday.
                            In Montana, fire officials were bracing on Thursday for
                            advancement of the state's dominant wildfire after the blaze
                            increased to 191,000 acres, with some of the growth attributed to
                            deliberate burning as part of the fire battle.
                            South-central Montana's Derby Mountain fire, which started Aug.
                            22 and has burned 26 homes, increased from 185,000 acres. Further
                            growth was anticipated because of wind and the density of dead
                            trees, said Dixie Dies, fire information officer.
                            "It's real rugged," Dies said. "We can't get equipment in
                            there." Firefighting includes digging shallow trenches, or lines,
                            in the ground to inhibit fire growth.
                            Officials were concerned about the fire spreading further west
                            into the Boulder River Valley. The fire crossed into the valley -
                            setting for the movie "The Horse Whisperer" and home to historic
                            ranches and wealthy vacation homes - earlier this week. So far,
                            flames have not reached any homes in the valley.
                            Forty-five percent of the fire was contained.
                            Plans called for an end Friday to evacuation orders issued
                            Sunday, with returning residents to remain on alert in case
                            conditions change and they are advised to leave again. Lifting
                            evacuation orders will open access to 265 homes, officials said.
                            In Idaho, three more fires sparked by dry lightning brought the
                            total number of large blazes burning in the state to 17.
                            Nine large fires were burning in both Washington and Oregon as
                            the Pacific Northwest's fire season dragged into the waning days of
                            summer, when rains usually douse the flames.
                            In Washington, state and county authorities have advised
                            residents in much of Eastern Washington to take precautions against
                            heavy smoke from more than a dozen wildfires in the region.
                            "It is late in the year not to see any relief in sight and to
                            have heavy duty fire activity in similar ecosystems in Montana,
                            Washington and Oregon," said Rose Davis, a spokeswoman for the
                            National Interagency Fire Agency in Boise.
                            In California, a 4,230-acre wildfire was raging out of control
                            in the Los Padres National Forest on Thursday, spreading in all
                            directions as dry, windy weather and rugged terrain hampered
                            firefighters, authorities said.
                            No homes or structures were threatened and no one had been
                            injured fighting the blaze, which erupted Monday afternoon 10 miles
                            northwest of Castaic, said U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Brigitta
                            Van De Raay.
                            In Nevada, the latest fires come less than two weeks after crews
                            contained wildland blazes that scorched more than 240,000 acres, or
                            375 square miles, near Elko - about 300 miles east of Reno.
                            The fires meant more bad news for mule deer, antelope and other
                            wildlife that depend on the high desert's brush and grasses for
                            food and shelter.

                            Associated Press writers Martin Griffith in Reno, Susan
                            Gallagher in Helena and Jesse Harlan Alderman in Boise contributed
                            to this report.

                            On the Net:
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                            Nat'l Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/
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                            Comment


                            • #15
                              9/12/06

                              By SHANNON DININNY
                              Associated Press Writer
                              STEHEKIN, Wash. (AP) - The battle against a wildfire threatening
                              this remote lakeside town continued Tuesday, as firefighters cut
                              trees and vegetation to slow the fire's growth.
                              Blue skies and light winds greeted fire crews Tuesday at the
                              north end of Lake Chelan in mountainous north-central Washington,
                              where an estimated 60 residents have been watching the Flick Creek
                              fire burn nearby for nearly seven weeks.
                              Already, the fire has blackened more than 11 square miles, to
                              within yards of a National Park Service visitor center, a post
                              office and several other buildings. Authorities ordered a mandatory
                              evacuation of the boat landing and about 25 homes, largely summer
                              rentals, prompting 100 tourists to leave.
                              However, most residents of the close-knit community, which is
                              reachable only by boat or float plane, refused to leave despite
                              warnings that they, too, may be forced to flee if the fire grows.
                              The community is surrounded by wilderness area, the North
                              Cascades National Park and U.S. Forest Service land. Miles of
                              trails make the scenic area a popular destination for tourists, who
                              can escape to a town that does not even have telephone service.
                              A single road leads around the end of the lake from the boat
                              landing into the Stehekin Valley, where it reaches a dead end.
                              Residents have no other way out if fire closes the road.
                              The 7,576-acre fire was holding in an area called Imus Creek,
                              but fire managers were concerned that southeast winds could blow
                              the blaze toward the road Tuesday, said Barbara Budd, a U.S. Forest
                              Service spokeswoman.
                              Regular ferry service to Stehekin has been canceled.
                              About 20 firefighters battled the blaze Tuesday, cutting trees
                              and vegetation near the road, carefully dodging electricity lines
                              with the aid of power crews. Still more firefighting resources were
                              expected to arrive during the day, said U.S. Forest Service
                              spokesman Mick Mueller.
                              Chelan County Sheriff Mike Harum also met with Gov. Chris
                              Gregoire on Tuesday to alert her to the situation and request
                              additional resources. Gregoire visited Stehekin days after the fire
                              was started July 26 by a campfire.
                              Any equipment that does arrive, such as water tenders, still
                              face a six-hour barge ride to Stehekin, said Deputy Sheriff Maria
                              Agnew.
                              "The truth is it could go either way, depending on what the
                              weather allows," Agnew said. "Obviously, we're looking for
                              resources to help put the fire out."
                              Fire managers planned a community meeting with Stehekin
                              residents Tuesday evening to discuss the fire.
                              Firefighting efforts continued around the West as the wildfire
                              season stretched toward autumn.
                              In California, crews fought a fast-moving wildfire that scorched
                              more than 30 square miles and threatened to jump Interstate 5 north
                              of Los Angeles and march into the Angeles National Forest.
                              The fire, which started on Labor Day in a remote area in the Los
                              Padres National Forest, has burned 19,523 acres and was 25 percent
                              contained by Tuesday. Authorities temporarily shut down the highway
                              in both directions in the area, but reopened some lanes early
                              Tuesday.
                              The blaze, which U.S. Forest Service investigators said was
                              sparked by someone burning debris, scorched mostly chaparral and
                              brushy hillsides over the last week, but rapidly spread east Monday
                              afternoon due to hot, dry and windy weather.
                              In south-central Montana, crews continued to reinforce
                              containment lines on the southwest edge of the fire that has burned
                              an estimated 208,000 acres since it erupted three weeks ago.
                              About a mile of line remains to be built on the western edge of
                              the fire and managers began releasing a few crews. The total number
                              of firefighters dropping by about 300 - to about 750.
                              Early on, the fire burned 26 homes and about 22 other buildings,
                              and forced the evacuation of hundreds of residents. Two more burned
                              buildings have been confirmed, managers said. The fire was reported
                              to be 70 percent contained by Tuesday.
                              ---
                              On the Net:
                              Flick fire: http://www.inciweb.org/incident/360/
                              National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/

                              (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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