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  • #61
    August 17th

    WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - Command of four wildfires burning in
    northcentral Washington has been transferred from a national team
    to a regional group of firefighters, now that the complexity of the
    fires has eased.
    The Flick Creek fire near the remote community of Stehekin and
    the Tinpan fire, which is burning in the Glacier Peak Wilderness,
    have become more subdued, said Paul Hart, U.S. Forest Service
    spokesman in Wenatchee.
    Firefighting efforts now are focused on the larger Tripod and
    Spur Peak fires, which together have burned more than 154 square
    miles, or 99,060 acres between Winthrop and Conconully.
    Firefighters remain concerned that the fire could grow to the
    north or northeast, where about eight miles of the fire remains
    unlined, said Ron DeHart, a U.S. Forest Service fire spokesman in
    Conconully.
    "We're not out of the woods on this one yet," he said. "We
    have what we call a dirty fire. It didn't burn clean. It
    hop-scotched around leaving lots of unburned areas."
    The fire was 25 percent contained Thursday. More than 3,000
    firefighters were assigned to the blaze, although the national
    command team transferred management of the north-central Washington
    blazes to a regional squad on Wednesday.
    Meanwhile, a Michigan woman was cited for reckless burning after
    fire investigators and police concluded her alleged illegal
    campfire sparked the Flick Creek fire near Stehekin. The fire has
    blackened 4,401 acres on the east shore of Lake Chelan. The fire
    was 50 percent contained Thursday.
    Mary Irene HayHoe, 46, from Mason, Mich., had been homeless and
    living in the Stehekin area the past eight months, Chelan County
    Sheriff Mike Harum said.
    HayHoe came forward to National Park Service authorities in
    Stehekin within hours of the start of the forest fire on July 26,
    Harum said. HayHoe told authorities that she thought she had
    extinguished her campfire. Investigators concluded that the woman
    made a good effort to do so, and the fire was accidental.
    However, campfires are not allowed in so-called "cross-country
    zones" away from trails. HayHoe also did not have a camping
    permit, police said.
    The reckless burning charge is a gross misdemeanor, punishable
    by a $5,000 fine and one year in jail. She also could be forced to
    pay restitution.
    Firefighting costs have been estimated at $800,000 so far, Harum
    said.
    "She's very sorry for what happened," Harum said. "Whether
    she can pay or not, she's going to be required to pay something."
    All visitor services in Stehekin remain open, but some trails
    and campgrounds in the Lake Chelan National Recreation Area and the
    Wenatchee National Forest remain closed.
    The 4,581-acre Tinpan fire along the Entiat River trail in the
    Glacier Peak Wilderness was being managed as a wildland use fire,
    meaning it will be allowed to burn naturally unless it threatens to
    go beyond preset boundaries.

    (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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    • #62
      August 20th

      WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - Fire crews held the line Sunday against
      the state's major fires, bracing for lightning forecast late Monday
      along the crest of the Cascades and into northcentral Washington.
      "There's not much in the way of precipitation" expected with
      the storms, said meteorologist Ted Buehner with the National
      Weather Service in Seattle. "The threat is primarily lightning
      strikes and local gusty winds associated with thunderstorms."
      He described the storms as "the hit and miss variety."
      Fire crews "have been working hard this weekend trying to do
      the containment," Buehner said. Told that acreage numbers had not
      changed much since Saturday, he added, "Part of the problem is the
      poor guys have that rough terrain to play with."
      Meanwhile, a new fire - estimated at 100 acres - was reported on
      Mount Rainier, just outside the park along the Carbon River. The
      fire apparently began Saturday, said spokeswoman Patty Hensen of
      the Department of Natural Resources.
      The fire is on private timberland, fire spokesman Dale Warriner
      said later. "We don't expect it to get into the park," he said.
      "There are no road closures at this time but there night be."
      About 60 people were on the fire late Sunday, and a
      fire-management team was taking it over from DNR early Monday,
      Warriner said. "It's very steep terrain. Heavy timber - very
      difficult," he said. No injuries had been reported and the fire
      posed no immediate threat to homes or structures.
      Fire coverage can be tough to assess due to smoke, noted Elton
      Thomas at the interagency fire center in Portland, Ore.
      The state's largest fire, the Tripod Complex between the
      northcentral towns of Winthrop and Conconully, was reported at
      107,226 acres Sunday - almost 4,000 acres less than was reported
      Saturday. Initially there were two fires - the Tripod and Spur Peak
      fires - but they merged Friday into one blaze. Fire crews worked to
      burn fuel in front of the fire, and to cut trail where possible. In
      addition to the tinder-dry weather, crews are struggling with
      thousands of dead trees left by previous insect infestations.
      More than 2,500 firefighters, including 550 soldiers from Fort
      Lewis, were assigned to the fires Saturday, working with 108
      engines, 37 dozers and 13 helicopters.
      The fire was 30 percent contained Sunday, Thomas said.
      The fire poses a potential threat to about 845 structures - 300
      houses, 120 commercial structures and hundreds of outbuildings in
      and around the towns of Winthrop and Conconully. Area residents
      have been told to be alert and prepared.
      Elsewhere, the Bear Gulch in the Olympic National Forest
      increased to 510 acres from 407 Saturday, said forest spokesman
      George Rubiaco. It was about 25 percent contained, he said, with 33
      firefighters and two helicopters working the flames.
      The Flick Creek fire was 50 percent contained on the east shore
      of Lake Chelan. That fire has blackened 4,420 acres.
      The 4,697-acre Tinpan fire along the Entiat River trail in the
      Glacier Peak Wilderness was being managed as a wildland-use fire,
      meaning it will be allowed to burn naturally unless it threatens to
      go beyond preset boundaries. Nearly 200 people were working the
      fire.

      (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment


      • #63
        August 21st

        WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - Fire crews are battling several large
        blazes in northcentral Washington, along with high temperatures and
        a lightning forecast that raised concerns about the potential for
        new fire starts.
        The National Weather Service issued a "red flag" warning
        Monday for all of Eastern Washington due to a high pressure system
        moving through the region, bringing high temperatures, low humidity
        and thunderstorms.
        As a result, the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center in
        Portland, Ore. positioned fire crews throughout Washington and
        Oregon to prepare for any new fire starts, said Vladimir Steblina,
        U.S. Forest Service spokesman for the Okanogan and Wenatchee
        National Forests.
        "When we get these low humidities and high winds - and they're
        also predicting dry lightning - fire behavior gets fairly
        aggressive," he said. "Everybody is kind of waiting on pins and
        needles to see what happens."
        Firefighters were forced to re-evaluate the safety of one remote
        community at the north end of Lake Chelan after the Flick Creek
        fire blew across a ridge and into the Hazard Creek drainage Monday.
        The fire was burning in steep, dangerous terrain about 2 miles
        from Stehekin, which is reachable only by boat, air, horse or on
        foot. However, it was burning at an elevation of 6,500 feet, far
        enough from the town that immediate evacuations were not warranted,
        said Maria Agnew, spokeswoman for the Chelan County sheriff's
        office.
        Agnew said authorities would notify residents to be prepared to
        evacuate if the fire rolls back to the 3,000-foot elevation, closer
        to the town.
        The fire has blackened more than seven square miles, or 4,738
        acres. It was 50 percent contained Monday.
        Stehekin residents can look up and "see fire up there
        glowing," fire spokeswoman Cindy Reichelt said Monday night, but
        fire bosses "seem to feel pretty comfortable that given the air
        attack" they have planned, "this thing isn't going to move too
        far down that drainage before they stop it."
        Aircraft have been dropping retardant and planned to drop more
        and that "slowed it down dramatically," she said, with winds
        expected out of the west that should push the fire back on itself.
        The largest fire in Washington, the Tripod Complex, has
        blackened nearly 190 square miles of forest between the
        northcentral towns of Winthrop and Conconully. Firefighters
        estimated the fire at 121,596 acres.
        More than 2,900 firefighters were assigned to the blaze, which
        was 40 percent contained late Monday, fire spokeswoman Nancy Jones
        said.
        No homes were immediately threatened by the Tripod Complex, but
        nine summer cabins were wrapped in a fire retardant material to
        shield them, fire spokeswoman Gala Miller said. The cabins are
        located about 15 miles north of Winthrop on the Chewuch River.
        Residents in the towns of Winthrop and Conconully also have been
        told to be alert and prepared. An estimated 845 structures - 300
        houses, 120 commercial structures and hundreds of outbuildings sit
        in the area.
        Just outside Mount Rainier National Park north of the Carbon
        River, 250 firefighters were battling the Carbon Copy fire, which
        was estimated at 150 acres late Monday.
        The fire was burning primarily on private land away from the
        park, and firefighters had constructed a fire line around the south
        side of the blaze. However, authorities closed the Carbon River
        road temporarily at State Route 165, blocking access to Coplay
        Lake, Summit Lake, Bearhead Trailhead and the Carbon access to the
        park.
        Cause of the fire remained under investigation.
        No homes were threatened and no injuries were reported.
        Elsewhere, the Bear Gulch in the Olympic National Forest was 25
        percent contained at 640 acres. The northwest part of Lake Cushman
        was closed to allow helicopters to dip for water. The Staircase,
        North Fork Skokomish River, Wagon Wheel and Staircase Rapids trails
        remained closed, as well as U.S. Forest Service Road 24.
        The 4,732-acre Tinpan fire along the Entiat River trail in the
        Glacier Peak Wilderness was being managed as a wildland-use fire,
        meaning it will be allowed to burn naturally unless it threatens to
        go beyond preset boundaries. Nearly 200 people were working the
        fire.

        (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #64
          New Fire...August 21st

          SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) - A timber and brush fire that broke out
          Monday night threatened several homes in north Spokane County, a
          fire spokesman said.
          No mandatory evacuation order was in place but firefighters had
          asked the residents of some three homes to leave and they did so,
          said Pat Humphries, a Spokane County Fire District 4 spokesman.
          The fire, reported shortly after 9:30 p.m., had covered 10-15
          acres by late Monday night, he said.
          The fire was burning on a hillside west of U.S. Highway 395,
          near the Wandermere Golf Course.
          No structures have burned but as many as eight homes were
          threatened, three on one side of the hill and another four to five
          on the other side, Humphries said.
          Several bulldozers were working to flank the sides of the fire
          and try to pinch it off; some 30 state Department of Natural
          Resources and District 4 firefighters were attacking the blaze.
          "We can see a fire over the hill," Rick Osterback of Double
          Eagle Stables told KREM-TV. "We're in the process of loading up
          our horses right now."
          The stable was home to 50 horses and "we're just trying to get
          our horses out of harm's way," he said,
          The cause of the fire was not immediately known.

          (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment


          • #65
            August 22nd

            DAYTON, Wash. (AP) - Wind-driven wildfires near this southeast
            Washington town raced across more than 15,000 acres Tuesday,
            prompting authorities to tell as many as 300 nearby residents to
            leave. Some 35 residents of a nursing home were evacuated due to
            heavy smoke.
            Much of Eastern Washington remained under a "red flag" warning
            for extreme fire threat. Weather forecasters predicted scattered
            thunderstorms, wind and low humidity that could increase the
            danger, as firefighters battled some half-dozen blazes around the
            state.
            Lightning sparked the Columbia County Complex fires late Monday
            evening, and by Tuesday night, the blaze had grown to more than
            15,000 acres, or more than 23 square miles. The fire was burning in
            grass, brush, trees and wheat fields.
            Some 300 firefighters from all over the state focused on
            protecting homes, said Ray Steiger, a spokesman for the management
            team on the fire.
            No residences had burned as of late Tuesday night although
            flames claimed some outbuildings and a couple of vehicles, Steiger
            said.
            No injuries were reported and the main fires were burning to the
            south-southeast, away from this community of about 2,700 people.
            As many as 300 residents, mostly in some 200 scattered ranch
            houses, were told to evacuate, Steiger said. The Red Cross set up a
            shelter at a local elementary school.
            Three or four patients at a small rural Dayton hospital were
            evacuated, also due to smoky air concerns, he said.
            With steady winds of 20-25 mph and gusts to 30 mph, Tuesday's
            emphasis was on protecting homes, Steiger said.
            "The guys doing structure protection did a tremendous job
            today," he said. "Some of that grass burns fast and hot and they
            were standing right there and protecting" the homes.
            Winds eased Tuesday night.
            The state's largest fire remains the Tripod Complex between
            Winthrop and Conconully. The fire has blackened nearly 190 square
            miles, or 121,596 acres, of forested land in northcentral
            Washington, and was 40 percent contained.
            Nearly 3,000 firefighters were assigned to the fire. Extreme
            fire behavior forced dozens of firefighters to retreat as the blaze
            pushed to the northeast Monday into the Loomis State Forest.
            However, the community of Loomis remained safe, about eight miles
            from the fire, said U.S. Forest Service spokesman Ron DeHart.
            No structures have burned, and no homes have been evacuated.
            To the west, the Flick Creek and Tinpan fires were relatively
            quiet Tuesday, said Cindy Reichelt, spokeswoman for the state team
            handling the fires.
            The 5,142-acre Tinpan fire along the Entiat River trail in the
            Glacier Peak Wilderness was being managed as a wildland-use fire,
            meaning it will be allowed to burn naturally unless it threatens to
            go beyond preset boundaries.
            The Flick Creek fire on the east shore of Lake Chelan has
            threatened the remote community of Stehekin several times. Stehekin
            is reachable only by boat, air, horse or on foot.
            However, the fire continued to burn at a high enough elevation
            Tuesday that homes in Stehekin remained safe, Reichelt said. One
            spot on a ridge in Purple Creek spewed smoke, but fire crews could
            not work in the steep terrain and air tankers were transferred to
            other blazes in the state, she said.
            The fire has blackened more than seven square miles, or 4,822
            acres. It was 40 percent contained Tuesday.
            Lightning sparked the Tripod Complex and Tinpan fires last
            month, while the Flick Creek fire resulted from an illegal
            campfire.
            Authorities were still investigating the cause of a 40-acre
            wildfire west of U.S. Highway 395 in north Spokane County. Fire
            crews had constructed lines around the entire fire Tuesday and were
            mopping up hot spots, said Rette Bidstrup of the state Department
            of Natural Resources.
            Just outside Mount Rainier National Park north of the Carbon
            River, 242 firefighters were battling the Carbon Copy fire, which
            was estimated at 150 acres Tuesday.
            The fire was burning primarily on private land away from the
            park, and firefighters had constructed a fire line around the south
            side of the blaze.
            The fire was believed to have been human-caused, but remained
            under investigation.
            No homes were threatened and no injuries were reported.
            Elsewhere, the Bear Gulch fire in the Olympic National Forest
            was 25 percent contained at 640 acres.

            (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

            Comment


            • #66
              August 23rd evening update

              CONCONULLY, Wash. (AP) - Gov. Chris Gregoire has declared a
              statewide wildfire emergency citing fires already burning and the
              potential for more as forecasters continue to predict
              thunderstorms, high winds and low humidity in many areas.
              "Numerous wildfires across Washington pose a serious threat to
              homes, infrastructure, businesses and natural resources ... and our
              firefighting resources have begun to grow scarce," Gregoire said
              Wednesday following a helicopter tour of the state's largest fire,
              the Tripod complex in northcentral Washington.
              The proclamation frees state agencies to spend money and
              resources to help local jurisdictions fight wildfires.
              "Those are the sorts of things that help us in terms of making
              it easier to get resources," said Ray Steiger, an information
              officer at the Columbia County fire complex in southeastern
              Washington.
              The biggest fire in Columbia County, the Payne Hollow fire south
              of Dayton, almost doubled in size in about 24 hours to an estimated
              25,000 acres Wednesday, nearly 40 square miles. The fire complex
              covered about 34,000 acres, more than 53 square miles.
              The lightning-caused Columbia County fires have destroyed two
              residences and 10 outbuildings, Lisa Caldwell, a county emergency
              management official, said Wednesday night. One firefighter was
              treated for a knee injury, she said.
              An unknown number of residents along a roughly five-mile stretch
              of the Tucannon River were told to evacuate Wednesday, as were some
              residents on Robinette Mountain and along Wolf Fork Road, she
              added.
              In nearby Walla Walla County, also in southeastern Washington,
              the Coppei Fire -part of the three-fire Coppei complex - had
              charred 2,000 acres, Caldwell said, and some residents along Coppei
              Creek were urged to evacuate. She said she didn't know how many
              homes were affected.
              Thirty-five residents evacuated Tuesday from a nursing home in
              Dayton were allowed to return after smoke from the Columbia County
              complex had cleared, and residents of some of the 200 homes that
              were evacuated also came back, Steiger said.
              In contrast to the forecast for most other wildfire-prone parts
              of the state, firefighters in the southeast corner were relieved by
              predictions of lower winds, temperatures and humidity early
              Thursday, officials said.
              The governor flew over the 200-square-mile Tripod complex in a
              Blackhawk helicopter as flames leaped 100 feet into the air. Nearly
              3,000 firefighters were assigned to those fires, which were burning
              between Winthrop and Conconully and were 40 percent contained.
              Afterward Gregoire met with fire officials and area residents.
              "It's very rugged terrain," Gregoire said. "The firefighters
              go in and put up a line, and the fire will jump a mile over the
              line. They're doing a great job of thus far being able to protect
              the community, which is priority number one. We're just hoping now
              the weather cooperates."
              Instead, the forecast called for more thunderstorms, high winds
              and low humidity after lightning started several new fires in
              tinder dry, bug-killed timber in the Okanogan and Wenatchee
              national forests. One in the Cedar Creek drainage south of State
              Route 20 had reached 600 acres.
              To the west, the Flick Creek and Tinpan fires were each burning
              more than 5,000 acres, roughly 8 square miles.
              The Tinpan fire along the Entiat River trail in the Glacier Peak
              Wilderness was being managed as a wildland-use fire, allowed to
              burn naturally unless it threatens to go beyond preset boundaries.
              The Flick Creek fire on the east shore of Lake Chelan was 40
              percent contained.
              Lightning started the Tripod and Tinpan fires last month, while
              the Flick Creek fire resulted from an illegal campfire.
              West of the crest of the Cascade Range, just northwest of Mount
              Rainier National Park and north of the Carbon River, 242
              firefighters were battling the human-caused Carbon Copy fire, which
              was estimated 5 percent contained at 160 acres on Wednesday.
              The fire was burning primarily on private land away from the
              park, and firefighters had constructed a fire line around the south
              side of the blaze.
              No homes were threatened and no injuries were reported.
              The Bear Gulch fire in the Olympic National Forest was 25
              percent contained at 750 acres.
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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              • #67
                August 24th 2006

                DAYTON, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters from Arizona, Oregon and New
                Mexico joined the fight Thursday against a group of fast-growing
                wildfires in southeastern Washington, and officials said they still
                need more help.
                "The call has gone out," said Louise Day, fire information
                officer at the Columbia County fires. "The growth potential for
                the fires is still extreme."
                Two hundred buildings were threatened by the fires, which
                covered nearly 100 square miles near Dayton on Thursday - up from
                53 square miles Wednesday. Two homes had been destroyed, 35
                outbuildings had been damaged and about 300 people had been urged
                to evacuate. More than 500 firefighters were battling the blazes.
                The state Department of Natural Resources generally keeps
                several firefighting teams free for initial attack on new blazes.
                But those teams have been busy for weeks, and the state has nearly
                exhausted its resources, said Public Lands Commissioner Doug
                Sutherland.
                On Thursday, Sutherland ordered up a DC-10 jet capable of
                dropping as much as eight times more retardant than the usual air
                tanker. The giant plane, which is owned by a private contractor,
                costs $26,000 an hour, with a minimum of three hours a day.

                Sutherland said he expects to use the jetliner, which can drop a
                line of retardant 50 feet wide and more than a mile long, for two
                days, or about six hours, including travel time from Southern
                California.
                "It's not inexpensive, but depending on how you use it, it
                could very well be less expensive than using other resources that
                are currently not even available," he said in a telephone
                interview from Olympia.
                Gov. Chris Gregoire declared a state of emergency Wednesday,
                allowing state agencies to send money and resources to help local
                jurisdictions battle the blazes.
                Conditions were better for firefighting Thursday, with lower
                winds and temperatures. But forecasts call for higher temperatures
                and dry conditions over the weekend and into next week.
                In Walla Walla County, in southeastern Washington, some
                residents along Coppei Creek were urged to evacuate as three fires
                burned nearby.
                In eastern Oregon, wildfires burned through tens of thousands of
                acres of grass, sagebrush and juniper. Most of the fires were
                started by lightning.
                "It's been hectic," said Tara Wilson, spokeswoman for
                firefighting agencies south of Burns. "We are getting tired, and
                our crews are getting tired. Things are stretched pretty thin.
                We've just had too much of the high winds, and the fires are pretty
                erratic in their behavior. It's going to be a long fight."
                In Montana, firefighters continued to battle a blaze in a
                subdivision east of Billings that had burned nearly 3,900 acres -
                or roughly 6 square miles. It was 85 percent contained by Thursday
                evening.
                More than 7 million acres, about 11,000 square miles, have
                burned across the U.S. this year, well above the average of about
                4.4 million acres by this time of year, according to the National
                Interagency Fire Center.
                ---
                On the Net:
                Nat'l Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                Comment


                • #68
                  August 27th 2006

                  By PEGGY ANDERSEN
                  Associated Press Writer
                  Thousands of firefighters battled hot weather again Sunday -
                  with even higher temperatures forecast Monday - as they worked to
                  corral stubborn wildfires burning across Washington state.
                  "Red-flag" conditions - based on high temperatures and low
                  humidity - were forecast Monday on the Columbia Complex of fires in
                  the southeast corner of the state, fire spokesman Charlie Armiger
                  said. But a cold front due Tuesday should cool things down later in
                  the week, forecasters said.
                  No major runs were reported on the fires Sunday, and most
                  continued to grow slowly.
                  Flames from the Columbia Complex spread onto the Umatilla
                  National Forest, burning about 60 to 80 acres of the federal land
                  southeast of Dayton, fire spokesman Neal Kephart said.
                  Updated mapping allowed fire bosses to reduce the estimated size
                  of the Columbia Complex 64,171 acres, or about 100 square miles. It
                  had been listed at about 70,000 acres Saturday night. The fires
                  that make up the complex began with lightning strikes Monday.
                  Fire officials continued to discourage gawkers from getting near
                  the fire scene.
                  "We're asking people to stay out of the fire area," Kephart
                  said. "Some of the onlookers have somewhat hampered firefighting
                  efforts, blocking roads and so forth."
                  Some area cabins also were evacuated Saturday, but no additional
                  evacuations had been ordered by midday Sunday, and no additional
                  structures were reported damaged or lost, he said.
                  Meanwhile, a heavy helicopter capable of carrying a 900-gallon
                  water bucket arrived to back up two smaller, 300-gallon-bucket
                  copters, Kephart said. A specially equipped DC-10 capable of
                  carrying 12,000 gallons of fire retardant is also working the fire,
                  generating some of the onlookers' interest.
                  Fresh ground crews arrived from British Columbia and Alberta,
                  Canada, joining 750 already at the scene. More than 100 additional
                  firefighters were expected, some from as far away as North
                  Carolina.
                  The fire remained about 10 percent contained, with no estimate
                  yet for total containment, he said.
                  Winds were light Sunday, below 10 mph, but hotter, drier weather
                  was expected Monday, with highs in the 90s and 100s.
                  "It's hot and getting hotter," said meteorologist Jonathan Fox
                  with the National Weather Service in Spokane.
                  A cold front - dropping temperatures 10 to 15 degrees,
                  increasing humidity and possibly including some showers - was
                  expected to move in Tuesday, he said. The cooler weather also will
                  bring more wind, but it is hoped the cooler, damper conditions will
                  counter the wind's impact, Fox said.
                  By Wednesday and Thursday, temperatures could drop into the 60s
                  and 70s, he said - well below normal for this time of year.
                  "The worst-case fire weather is where you combine strong winds,
                  low relative humidity" and high temperatures, he said. "If you've
                  got real strong winds and temperatures in the 90s and 100s - that
                  leads to extreme fire behavior. The winds just kind of fan the
                  flames."
                  When humidity rises, it counteracts the wind to some extent and
                  fire doesn't spread as easily, Fox said.
                  Here are updates on the state's other major fires:
                  -Tripod Complex, Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forests between
                  Winthrop and Concunully, estimated at 138,733 acres or about 217
                  square miles, 48 percent contained. Fires started July 3 and 24. On
                  site: 1,977 firefighters and support personnel, 12 helicopters of
                  various capabilities, 77 engines, 28 bulldozers, 69 300-gallon
                  water-tender trucks.
                  Winthrop and Concunully are open for business, fire managers
                  note.
                  -The Flick Creek fire, on the eastern shore of Lake Chelan in
                  the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, 5,160 acres or about eight
                  square miles, 40 percent contained. A human-caused fire that began
                  July 26. On site: 17 firefighters, one helicopter.
                  Stehekin, at the north end of the lake, is welcoming visitors
                  though there are some campground and trail closures in the area.
                  -The Tinpan fire, Glacier Peak Wilderness, 5,551 acres or about
                  8,6 square miles. Being allowed to burn naturally within preset
                  boundaries. Started by lighting July 6. On site: 107 firefighters,
                  two helicopters.
                  ---
                  Associated Press newsman Rory Marshall contributed to this
                  report.

                  (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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                  Comment


                  • #69
                    August 28th

                    DAYTON, Wash. (AP) - After battling Washington wildfires under
                    "red flag" conditions of high temperatures, winds and low
                    humidity, fire bosses crossed their fingers that cooler weather
                    expected to move into Eastern Washington would bring much-needed
                    relief.
                    But the cooler temperatures and higher relative humidity could
                    be a mixed bag, as the weather front could be accompanied by high
                    winds and lightning, which could drive existing fires and spark new
                    ones, fire spokesmen said.
                    A cold front - expected to drop temperatures 10 to 15 degrees
                    from current area highs in the 90s - was expected to move in
                    Tuesday, National Weather Service meteorologist Jonathan Fox said.
                    The cooler weather also will bring more wind, but it is hoped the
                    cooler, damper conditions will counter the wind's impact, Fox said
                    Monday.
                    By Wednesday and Thursday, temperatures could drop into the 60s
                    and 70s, he said. That is well below normal for this time of year.
                    The forecast change comes after "red-flag" warnings were
                    issued for both the Columbia Complex fires in southeastern
                    Washington and the Tripod Complex in the northcentral part of the
                    state.
                    While the weather was in transition, management of the massive
                    Columbia Complex of fires near Dayton also was changing.
                    A "Type 1" management team, experienced in handling larger,
                    more complex fires, was expected to take over fire boss duties on
                    Tuesday, spokesman Craig McCaa said.
                    "It's a sign of the continued concentration on this fire, given
                    the weather and structures that are threatened," he said.
                    Evacuation orders remained in effect for some vacation cabins
                    and homes in several drainages, according to an online update. Two
                    residences and several dozen outbuildings were burned last week by
                    the Columbia Complex fires.
                    The Columbia Complex has burned across more than 64,171 acres,
                    or about 103 square miles, and was reported 20 percent contained
                    Monday. The fires that make up the complex began with lightning
                    strikes Aug. 21.
                    The fires were being fought by about 735 firefighters, including
                    ground crews from British Columbia and Alberta, Canada.
                    Firefighters working the fire come from Alaska, Louisiana,
                    Virginia, North Carolina, Michigan, Arizona, California, Oregon,
                    Idaho and Colorado.
                    "I don't think there are many states that are not represented
                    here. It's a big family we got here," fire information officer
                    Virgil Mink said.
                    At the Tripod Complex in the Okanogan and Wenatchee National
                    Forests, crews on Monday focused on spot fires burning near and in
                    the Pasayten Wilderness, spokeswoman Diane Bedell said.
                    "There has been some very active burning in the northeastern
                    corner and it has pushed into the Pasayten Wilderness a bit," she
                    said.
                    The fire slopped over into the wilderness area near a feature
                    called Hickey's Hump. She did not know how many acres had burned in
                    the roadless area.
                    Crews were pulled off the fire at midday Monday when
                    temperature, humidity and wind speed combined to trigger a safety
                    alert, Bedell said.
                    The fires had blackened more than 139,568 acres, or about 218
                    square miles of timber and brush.
                    The fires that make up the complex, between Winthrop and
                    Conconully, were started by lightning in July and were about 50
                    percent contained.
                    The towns of Winthrop and Conconully are open for business
                    despite the fires, which are not likely to be fully contained until
                    Oct. 1, fire managers noted.
                    Meanwhile, Whitman County officials declared the 3,500-acre
                    Palouse River fire fully contained. The fire, believed to have
                    started last Wednesday from sparks from a harvest combine,
                    destroyed a grain elevator and railroad trestle near the town of
                    Colfax, but no homes were damaged.
                    Updates on the state's other major wildfires:
                    -The Flick Creek fire, on the eastern shore of Lake Chelan, had
                    covered 5,191 acres, or about eight square miles, and was 40
                    percent contained. The human-caused fire began July 26.
                    Stehekin, at the north end of the lake, is welcoming visitors
                    though there are some campground and trail closures in the area.
                    -The Tinpan fire, in the Glacier Peak Wilderness, had covered
                    6,183 acres or about 8.6 square miles. Started by lightning July 6,
                    it was being allowed to burn naturally within preset boundaries.
                    -The Tatoosh Complex, north of Mazama in the Pasayten
                    Wilderness, had burned across 2,550 acres and was being monitored.
                    That fire activity began Aug. 22 with lightning.
                    -The Carbon Copy fire near the northwest boundary of Mount
                    Rainier National Park had burned across 220 acres and was about 60
                    percent contained. In the same complex, the Bear Gulch fire, about
                    15 miles northwest of Hoodsport, was at 750 acres and about 25
                    percent contained.
                    -About 90 firefighters were battling a 12-acre fire burning
                    about four miles north of the Snohomish County town of Granite
                    Falls. The fire was about 75 percent contained and was not
                    considered a threat to homes late Monday, according to fire
                    information officer Nancy Joseph. That fire started Sunday evening
                    and its cause was under investigation.


                    (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
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                    Comment


                    • #70
                      August 29, 2006

                      WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - The huge Tripod wildfire burning in
                      northcentral Washington grew by nearly 3,000 acres in 24 hours, but
                      more favorable weather conditions were helping firefighters on
                      Tuesday.
                      The lightning-caused fire escaped north into the Pasayten
                      Wilderness, growing some 2,800 acres, during hot and windy
                      conditions Monday, fire spokesman Bud Nelson said. Firefighters
                      were pulled from the lines because of unsafe conditions.
                      The fire now covers about 142,326 acres, or about 222 square
                      miles, Nelson said.
                      "Today, where weather is more in our favor - with higher
                      humidity and lower temperatures and not as much wind - fire crews
                      will make a direct attack on the fire," Nelson said.
                      There are 1,562 people battling the Tripod Complex fire, and it
                      is about 48 percent trailed, he said.
                      Inside the wilderness boundaries, no mechanized equipment can be
                      used to fight the flames, though aircraft can drop water, Nelson
                      said.
                      Businesses in the nearby towns of Winthrop, Conconully and
                      Loomis are open, he noted. The fire is between Winthrop and
                      Conconully in the Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forests.
                      A cold front dropped temperatures 10 to 15 degrees from highs in
                      the 90s east of the Cascade Range as it crossed the state Tuesday,
                      carrying a chance of showers by Wednesday, according to National
                      Weather Service forecasts.
                      By Thursday temperatures could drop into the 60s and 70s across
                      the state, well below normal for this time of year, forecasters
                      said.
                      Meanwhile, the Columbia Complex of fires have blackened more
                      than 64,171 acres, or about 103 square miles near Dayton in
                      southeastern Washington.
                      The Columbia Complex, ignited by lightning on Aug. 21, was
                      reported 20 percent contained and was being fought by about 735
                      firefighters.
                      Among the state's other major wildfires:
                      -The human-caused Flick Creek fire on the eastern shore of Lake
                      Chelan had covered 5,191 acres, about eight square miles, and was
                      40 percent contained.
                      -The lightning-caused Tinpan fire in the Glacier Peak
                      Wilderness, covered 6,183 acres, about 8.6 square miles, and was
                      being allowed to burn naturally within preset boundaries.
                      -The lightning-caused Tatoosh Complex, north of Mazama in the
                      Pasayten, covered 2,550 acres, about four square miles, and was
                      being monitored.
                      -The Carbon Copy fire near the northwest boundary of Mount
                      Rainier National Park covered 220 acres and was about 60 percent
                      contained.
                      -The Bear Gulch fire near Olympic National Park stood at 800
                      acres and was 60 percent trailed.

                      (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                      Comment


                      • #71
                        9/3/06

                        Two biggest Washington wildfires grow


                        DAYTON, Wash. (AP) - Washington's two largest wildfires grew
                        today.
                        Warm, dry conditions helped the Columbia Complex of fires near
                        Dayton increase by about 4,000 acres on both yesterday and today.
                        They covered 88,652 acres by this evening.
                        Most of the fire growth was on the north end of the fire, with
                        the blaze moving toward Eastern Washington's big burn of last year.
                        The School Fire broke out on August 5th, 2005, and burned nearly
                        50,000 acres, and 109 houses before it was extinguished two weeks
                        later.
                        Fire spokesman Craig McCaa (pronounced McKay) told The
                        Associated Press that some of the weekend's growth resulted from
                        burnout operations. One of the highest priorities of the 1,754
                        firefighters working on the fire today was to get ready to protect
                        the Bluewood Ski Area east of Walla Walla, although the south flank
                        of the fire was still miles north of the resort.
                        McCaa says relatively quiet winds, averaging 8 miles per hour,
                        kept the Columbia Complex from growing as fast as the temperatures
                        in the 80s and 90s could have encouraged.
                        The weather forecast called for slightly cooler temperatures,
                        but gusting winds in the afternoon and a slight chance of
                        thunderstorms on both tomorrow and Tuesday.
                        Fire spokesman Greg Thayer says smoke kept fire officials from
                        getting an accurate measurement today of the Tripod Complex of
                        Fires northeast of Winthrop.
                        Thayer says the fire complex was 151,000 acres by this evening,
                        but was probably a few thousand acres larger.
                        Warm, dry conditions kept the fire moving today.

                        (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

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                        Comment


                        • #72
                          Hope we get another 3 day state mob call out to Dayton.
                          Thats some good income right there

                          Comment


                          • #73
                            9/4/06

                            MAZAMA, Wash. (AP) - Fires were burning across more than 270,000
                            acres in Washington state on Monday, and wildfire ash fell in the
                            remote northcentral Washington community of Stehekin - although not
                            from the nearby fire that has menaced the town for weeks.
                            Southerly winds brought the ash, not from the nearby Flick Creek
                            fire, but from the Tinpan Fire burning in the Glacier Peak
                            Wilderness, fire spokeswoman Jane Weber said.
                            The Flick Creek fire on the east shore of Lake Chelan is now
                            estimated to have burned 5,720 acres and was 40 percent contained.
                            It is burning on steep slopes above Stehekin, where residents
                            remain prepared to evacuate if need be.
                            Still "no evacuation is imminent, and residents and vacationers
                            had the opportunity to enjoy the Labor Day weekend in Stehekin,"
                            Weber said.
                            About 100 firefighters were working the lightning-caused
                            7,081-acre Tinpan fire.
                            A "red flag" warning for low humidity and gusty winds was
                            issued for the lightning-caused Tatoosh and Cedar Complex of fires,
                            north and south of Mazama in the Pasayten Wilderness.
                            The complex has burned more than 32,000 acres, or 50 square
                            miles, crossing the Pasayten River to the northwest and moving into
                            Canada.
                            Firefighters continued suppression and structure protection
                            Monday, while U.S. fire managers worked with a British Columbia
                            incident management team.
                            About 1,572 fire crew members were working the Tripod Complex
                            northeast of Winthrop. That complex had burned 240 square miles, or
                            153,836 acres. It was 56 percent contained.
                            Temperatures throughout much of northcentral Washington were
                            expected to be in the 80s Tuesday.
                            In southeast Washington, the Columbia Complex of fires was 25
                            percent contained at 88,652 acres Monday, more than 138 square
                            miles.
                            Over the Labor Day weekend, warm, dry weather helped those fires
                            increase about 4,000 acres, mostly at the north end where the blaze
                            moved toward the site of the August 2005 School fire that burned
                            50,000 acres and 109 houses.
                            In Western Washington, the Dewatto fire on the Kitsap Peninsula,
                            near Hood Canal, has burned more than 160 acres and prompted the
                            evacuation of a Boy Scout camp and several homes. Helicopters
                            dropped water over the holiday weekend and more than 140
                            firefighters worked on extinguishing hot spots Monday.
                            Fire spokeswoman Koshare Lomnicki said the fire was 20 percent
                            contained.
                            A fire reported Sunday along the west fork of the White River,
                            about 17 miles southeast of Buckley in Pierce County, quickly
                            spread to 350 acres in steep, brush- and tree-covered terrain, said
                            Allen Gibbs of the Forest Service. No homes were threatened.
                            Firefighters from nearby Mount Rainier National Park were fighting
                            the 7440 Fire, as were Forest Service crews, while three
                            helicopters dropped water Monday.
                            Other Washington fires of note:
                            -A 327-acre wildfire on Quinns Meadows Road near Colville, in
                            northeast Washington, was 85 percent contained.
                            -The Carbon Copy Complex near Carbonado in Western Washington
                            covered 280 acres and was 75 percent contained.
                            -The Bear Gulch fire near Olympic National Park stood at 800
                            acres and was 60 percent trailed.

                            (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
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                            Comment


                            • #74
                              Sept 6th

                              MAZAMA, Wash. (AP) - A second wildfire approached the Canadian
                              border Wednesday, authorities watched nervously for new fires
                              following a round of dry lightning strikes in Eastern Washington
                              and outdoor burning was banned around Seattle.
                              Firefighters responded to more than a dozen small fires Tuesday
                              following weekend storms in which the state was zapped by more than
                              80 lightning strikes. Lightning also was blamed for new fires to
                              the south in Oregon.
                              In addition to fighting a dozen large fires already burning
                              across the state, fire crews waited to see if any new starts would
                              need to be doused.
                              "You don't realize you even have a problem until days later,"
                              said Dan Eikum, assistant state fire marshal. "Weather forecasters
                              are predicting more of the same for at least the next two weeks,
                              and maybe the entire month, which is not good news all the way
                              around."
                              Gov. Chris Gregoire echoed that concern.
                              "We are, by no means, out of danger. In fact, we are in a very
                              troubling period right now," Gregoire said Tuesday. "We remained
                              concerned. Our resources are limited."
                              Citing a growing fire danger west of the Cascades, state and
                              local officials imposed a near-total ban on outdoor burning in
                              King, Pierce, Kitsap and Mason counties from Wednesday morning
                              until the central Puget Sound area receives significant rain. The
                              only exception is for propane and charcoal barbecue cookers.
                              More than 3,300 firefighters were assigned to the state's 10
                              largest fires, which have burned nearly 468 square miles.
                              The priority remained the Columbia complex, which was 40 percent
                              contained Wednesday. The fire has blackened 145 square miles, or
                              93,225 acres, near Dayton in southeast Washington.
                              The Columbia County sheriff's office reopened two roads, but
                              several hundred residents remained evacuated, said Virgil Mink, a
                              U.S. Forest Service fire information officer. More than 1,600
                              firefighters were assigned to the blaze, focusing on structure
                              protection and strengthening fire lines to protect the Bluewood Ski
                              Resort about 6 miles away.
                              Firefighters also attacked more than a dozen small
                              lightning-caused fires in the Umatilla National Forest, the largest
                              about 100 acres.
                              In northcentral Washington, 1,393 people were on the fire lines
                              northeast of Winthrop at the state's largest burn, the Tripod
                              complex, which has consumed 163,098 acres, or almost 255 square
                              miles, and was 56 percent contained. The northern flank of the fire
                              was within a mile of the Canadian border near Haig Mountain.
                              On Monday, the fire destroyed the historic Big Horn Cabin in
                              Horseshoe Basin, about 16 miles northwest of Loomis. The cabin had
                              been used by wilderness rangers and was not open to the public,
                              said Mark Pepin, spokesman for the Okanogan and Wenatchee National
                              Forests.
                              Canadian fire crews were monitoring the Tripod fire, as well as
                              the 34,000-acre Tatoosh fire, which previously burned from the
                              Pasayten Wilderness Area into British Columbia between Manning and
                              Cathedral provincial parks, about 125 miles east of Vancouver.
                              An evacuation alert was issued to an undetermined number of
                              residents "to get people ready ... in case they do have to leave
                              on short notice," said Mary Ann Leach of the Kamloops, British
                              Columbia, Fire Center.
                              Fire information officer Jeff Moore said Tuesday the fire was
                              "zero percent contained" in Canada because heavy smoke had kept
                              firefighters from getting close to the burn.
                              The entire Pasayten Wilderness Area was closed to recreation.
                              To the south, a new lightning-sparked fire burned 200 acres in
                              steep, rugged terrain within the Alpine Lakes Wilderness Area 20
                              miles northwest of Cle Elum in the central Cascades. Some popular
                              hiking trails were closed because of the Polallie fire, Forest
                              Service spokeswoman Robin DeMario said.
                              Lightning also started two other small fires near Cle Elum, as
                              well as a fire near Naches northwest of Yakima.
                              Other fires of note:
                              -In northcentral Washington, about 100 firefighters were working
                              the lightning-caused 7,457-acre Tinpan fire, while the 5,771-acre
                              Flick Creek fire was 40 percent contained. The Flick Creek fire was
                              burning on the east shore of Lake Chelan, while the Tinpan fire was
                              burning in the Glacier Peak Wilderness Area.
                              -The 327-acre Quinn's Meadow wildfire near Colville was 75
                              percent contained.
                              -In Western Washington, the Dewatto fire near Hood Canal was 50
                              percent contained at 160 acres. Two homes, a Boy Scout camp and two
                              campgrounds remained under a mandatory evacuation. The 800-acre
                              Bear Gulch fire near Olympic National Park and was 60 percent
                              trailed, and crews were monitoring the 280-acres Carbon Copy
                              complex near Carbonado, which was 75 percent contained.

                              (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
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                              Comment


                              • #75
                                Not enough help to go around on Washington fires

                                By SHANNON DININNY
                                Associated Press Writer
                                YAKIMA, Wash. (AP) - Summer is nearly over, but you wouldn't
                                know it by the high temperatures, dry lightning storms and blazing
                                wildfires across the Pacific Northwest.
                                The timing couldn't be worse, with seasonal firefighters poised
                                to return to college and other jobs elsewhere.
                                In just the past week, more than 100 requests for a 20-person
                                fire crew went unfilled in Washington and Oregon alone, said Kathy
                                Fletcher, spokeswoman for the Northwest Interagency Coordination
                                Center in Portland, Ore.
                                At the Yakama Indian Reservation in central Washington, fire
                                managers have waited for more crews to arrive to help fight a
                                lightning-sparked wildfire that has grown rapidly in remote, rugged
                                forest. In Washington's central Cascade Mountains, the Polallie
                                fire burned unabated as fire managers, with no local firefighters
                                available, waited for a national crew to arrive.
                                The center estimates state and federal agencies, as well as
                                contract fire crews, will lose 15 percent of their firefighters as
                                they return to college and other jobs in the next few weeks, while
                                forecasters have predicted more of the same hot, dry weather.
                                "The extended forecast indicates no relief," Fletcher said.
                                "The good news is the days are getting shorter and the nights are
                                getting cooler, which helps in the firefighting efforts."
                                On Thursday, the two top priority wildfires for national
                                resources were in Washington state, with more than 3,000
                                firefighters assigned to the Tripod complex and Columbia complex.
                                The lightning-caused Columbia complex, near the farming
                                community of Dayton, has blackened 150 square miles of wheat
                                fields, brush and forest in southeastern Washington. The fire was
                                45 percent contained Thursday.
                                In north-central Washington, firefighters continued their battle
                                on the massive Tripod complex, about seven miles northwest of
                                Winthrop. Just one of three wildfires burning in the Pasayten
                                Wilderness Area, the Tripod complex has burned nearly 258 square
                                miles.
                                At its northern flank, the fire was burning more than a mile
                                south of the Canadian border. No structures were immediately
                                threatened, and the blaze was 56 percent contained.
                                The Tatoosh complex, 18 miles northwest of Mazama, was estimated
                                at 34,000 acres and had already burned into Canada, where the fire
                                was burning actively. U.S. and Canadian fire managers also were
                                monitoring the Van Peak fire, which was burning between the Tripod
                                and Tatoosh fires about five miles south of the border.
                                Residents in Mazama remained on notice they could have to
                                evacuate if the Cedar Creek fire grows. That blaze, estimated at
                                about two square miles or 1,450 acres southwest of town, was 40
                                percent contained Thursday.
                                Farther south, some residents in the remote community of
                                Stehekin were warned - yet again - they might have to flee the
                                Flick Creek fire on the east shore of Lake Chelan. The fire,
                                estimated at 5,812 acres, has been threatening the town since it
                                was accidentally started by a campfire July 26.
                                The town of about 100 full-time residents sits at the end of
                                Lake Chelan, reachable only by boat, floatplane, horse or on foot.
                                The fire was backing down the Hazard Creek drainage toward
                                Stehekin, but remained about a mile away from the boat landing,
                                said Betty Higgins, fire information officer.
                                "Water is being dropped right below the fire to calm it down,
                                but we do have hot and dry conditions," Higgins said.
                                The Tinpan fire in the Glacier Peak Wilderness also grew, to
                                7,930 acres, or about 12 square miles. Roughly 108 firefighters
                                were assigned to the blaze.
                                Additional firefighters and resources arrived at some of the
                                newer blazes, all caused by lightning. Twenty firefighters worked
                                to protect structures near the Polallie fire, 15 miles northwest of
                                Cle Elum in the Alpine Lakes Wilderness.
                                The fire forced the closure of Cle Elum Valley, a box canyon
                                with more than 25 summer homes and several campsites.
                                A state crew arrived Thursday to assist tribal, local and
                                federal firefighters on the Yakama Indian Reservation. Lightning
                                earlier this week started three fires in all on the reservation.
                                The fires were burning in a rural area near the Klickitat River.
                                Just one was contained, said Edwin Lewis, forest manager for the
                                Bureau of Indian Affairs.
                                No structures were threatened.
                                In the meantime, fire managers urged people to be aware of
                                conditions and restrictions on public lands. Numerous trail and
                                road closures and campfire restrictions are in place across the
                                region, said Fletcher from the Portland center.
                                "With the extension of fire season, folks should be safe - know
                                where they're going and what they're getting into," Fletcher said.
                                "That's always true, but even more so now."

                                (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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