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  • #46
    July 26th

    WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters backed by two helicopters
    made a stand Tuesday against a flareup in a 2,000-acre wildfire,
    keeping the flames from reaching nearby wheat fields, a fire
    spokesman said.
    Winds had fanned some hot spots within a burned-over area.
    "The fire made it to the top of the hill, onto the plateau, but
    two copters and two strike teams were there to put it out," said
    State Patrol Trooper Greg Pressel, a spokesman for the state fire
    marshal's office.
    "It did not reach the wheat fields on top of the plateau."
    About 30 homes had been on evacuation notice earlier in the day
    but were no longer considered threatened late Tuesday, he said.
    Elsewhere in Eastern Washington, two other wildfires have been
    contained.
    The Wenatchee-area fire, burning in grass and sage about five
    miles east of this central Washington city, was considered about 10
    percent contained late Tuesday, with bulldozers working to carve a
    firebreak around it. Water has been sprayed around the edges of the
    fire, Pressel said.
    Crews were also patrolling the fire boundaries Tuesday night.
    If weather conditions are favorable, full containment could be
    possible by late Wednesday, Pressel said.
    Temperatures in the 90s were forecast, with slight winds.
    In addition to local crews, about 100 firefighters from eight
    counties were sent to the fire, as well as 20 engines, five water
    tenders, the two helicopters and two bulldozers.
    The cause of the fire, first reported at 5 p.m. Monday, was
    under investigation, Pressel said.
    No homes were threatened in earlier blazes in Klickitat and
    Benton counties, nor were injuries reported in any of the fires.
    The National Weather Service issued a fire weather watch for
    Wednesday through Thursday evening for Klickitat, Benton, Franklin,
    Grant, Columbia and Walla Walla counties.
    Elsewhere, about 600 firefighters contained a wildfire Tuesday
    on more than 6,000 acres in Klickitat County, mostly in a steep
    draw near Washington 14 about four miles north of Roosevelt and
    about 30 miles east of Goldendale.
    Authorities said that fire was started by a wheat harvesting
    combine.
    A fire that began Monday afternoon on a farm in Benton County
    blackened 3,500 acres before being contained, said Bob Gear, fire
    chief for County Fire District No. 1.

    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
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    • #47
      July 27th

      WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters hoped to have a wildfire
      that had threatened homes and wheat fields fully contained by
      Thursday morning, a spokesman said.
      The 2,000-acre wildfire was about 80 percent contained Wednesday
      evening, said State Patrol Trooper Greg Pressel, a spokesman for
      the state fire marshal's office. More than 100 firefighters from
      eight Washington counties were assigned to the blaze about five
      miles east of Wenatchee in central Washington.
      At one point, a separate fire started to the north of the Badger
      Road fire, but the 50-acre blaze burned into the Badger Road fire
      and doused itself.
      The cause of the original fire, first reported at 5 p.m. Monday,
      remained under investigation, Pressel said.
      The National Weather Service issued a fire weather watch through
      Thursday evening for Klickitat, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Columbia
      and Walla Walla counties. No new fires were reported in Washington
      on Wednesday, according to the Northwest Interagency Incident
      Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
      A fire burning in a steep draw near Washington 14 about four
      miles north of Roosevelt and 30 miles east of Goldendale remained
      at 5,400 acres on Wednesday. About 600 firefighters contained that
      wildfire Tuesday.
      Authorities said that fire was started by a wheat harvesting
      combine.

      (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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      • #48
        July 31st

        WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) - A wildfire burning close to scores of
        homes near Lake Wenatchee grew to more than 500 acres Sunday,
        officials said.
        The fire was burning on the southern face of Dirtyface Mountain
        in Chelan County, U.S. Forest Service and State Patrol officials
        said.
        The blaze started late Saturday evening on private land before
        spreading to state-protected land and finally parts of the
        Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, Forest Service spokeswoman
        Robin DeMario said.
        The patrol said there were about 140 homes in the area, along
        the Lake Wenatchee Highway. The structures were down the mountain
        from the fire's front and could be threatened if the fire spreads
        toward the highway, DeMario said.
        "If the fire remains midslope and goes up to the top of the
        slope, there are no homes in that area," DeMario said.
        The blaze was on extremely steep terrain, in timber, grass and
        brush. Firefighters were using hiking trails to help build fire
        lines Sunday, and helicopters and air tankers were dropping water
        and retardant on the scene, DeMario said.
        No evacuations were ordered Sunday. Officials were expecting
        engines aimed at protecting the structures to begin arriving
        Monday.
        More than 100 people were working on the fire Sunday, and
        officials expected about 150 to arrive through Monday.
        A combined state and federal team was set to take over
        management of the fire Monday morning, DeMario said.

        (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

        APTV 07-31-05 2226EDT
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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        • #49
          August 1st

          WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) - A wildfire believed to have started in a
          burning mobile home before igniting nearby brush had grown to more
          than 960 acres by Monday evening and threatened more than 140
          homes, fire officials said.
          The fire was burning on the southern face of Dirtyface Mountain
          in Chelan County. Fire officials ordered the evacuation of 75 homes
          in the Whispering Pines subdivision north of Highway 207, the Lake
          Wenatchee Highway, after the fire burned to within 100 yards of
          some homes.
          Another 70 scattered homes in the area remained under notice
          they might have to evacuate as well, Forest Service spokeswoman
          Robin DeMario said. A bulldozer line had been built around the
          subdivision and sprinklers were in place to protect against flying
          embers.
          The fire, believed to have started Saturday evening, was
          reported 10 percent contained Monday evening, according to the
          Central Washington Area Incident Management Team.
          Fire officials met Monday night with about 150 residents at a
          public meeting.
          "They had lots of good questions. I think we answered a lot of
          community concerns," said Roland Emetaz, a spokesman for the
          incident management team.
          He had no estimate on when the fire might be fully contained but
          said Monday's cooler weather would be replaced by warmer
          temperatures and lower humidity Tuesday.
          "That's the downside," he said, adding that on the plus side,
          winds were expected to decrease to 5-10 mph and expected to be
          blowing upslope, away from most homes.
          Elsewhere in northcentral Washington, a wildfire about 12 miles
          northwest of Stehekin, in North Cascades National Park, had grown
          to 109 acres by Monday evening.
          Firefighters were trying to stop that fire from spreading toward
          the lower Stehekin Valley, where it could threaten homes, park
          officials said.
          No injuries were reported in either fire.
          In the Dirtyface fire, the American Red Cross has established a
          shelter for evacuated residents at the Icicle River Middle School
          in Leavenworth.
          The blaze was believed to have started in a mobile home before
          spreading to state-protected land and parts of the
          Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, DeMario said. The fire was
          burning grass, brush and timber in extremely steep terrain.
          Nothing was left of the mobile home Monday. Fire officials said
          the cause of the fire was still under investigation.
          Firefighters were using hiking trails to help build fire lines,
          and helicopters and air tankers were dropping water and retardant,
          DeMario said.
          As many as 400 firefighters were assigned to the fire. A
          combined state and federal team took over management of the fire on
          Monday, DeMario said.
          No structures had been damaged, aside from the original mobile
          home.
          A park ranger spotted the North Cascades fire on Sunday, and
          eight smokejumpers from Winthrop flew to the scene. About 65
          firefighters were assigned to the fire by Monday evening, digging
          lines, and two helicopters were dropping water.
          Since the fire started near a trail, officials suspected it was
          caused by a person.
          The Pacific Crest Trail remained open, although hikers were
          advised to reroute via the Rainbow Creek and McAlester Creek
          trails.

          (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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          • #50
            Aug 2nd

            LEAVENWORTH, Wash. (AP) - Hundreds of firefighters continued to
            battle a blaze near Lake Wenatchee on Tuesday, as Gov. Christine
            Gregoire flew over the fire by helicopter to assess the damage.
            The fire was burning on the south slope of Dirtyface Mountain in
            Chelan County, about 10 miles northeast of Stevens Pass and 18
            miles northwest of Leavenworth. The blaze had burned nearly 1,000
            acres and was 20 percent contained by Tuesday night, said Pam
            Novitzky, a spokeswoman at the Dirtyface fire camp.
            With the fire threat easing, residents of 75 homes in the
            Whispering Pines subdivision north of Highway 207, the Lake
            Wenatchee Highway, will be allowed to return to their homes
            Wednesday, she said. Fire officials ordered the evacuation Monday
            after the fire burned to within 100 yards of some homes.
            Residents of another 70 scattered homes in the area remained
            under notice they might have to evacuate. The American Red Cross
            had established a shelter for evacuated residents at the Icicle
            River Middle School in Leavenworth.
            No injuries have been reported.
            After a brief cooling period Monday, the weather has gotten
            warmer, with high temperatures forecast to possibly hit 100 on
            Thursday, Novitzky said.
            Still, "in general people feel very good about what they were
            able to get done today," she said, although there is "still a lot
            of work to do."
            Earlier Tuesday, Roland Emetaz with the Central Washington Area
            Incident Management Team said winds had been blowing upslope, away
            from nearby homes.
            The fire was listed as the top priority Tuesday for firefighting
            resources nationally. About 350 firefighters already were assigned
            to the fire, and 300 more were on their way. Three heavy
            helicopters were dropping retardant and four smaller helicopters
            were dropping water.
            Firefighters were hopeful the fire could be contained in the
            next 24 to 48 hours, Gregoire said in a telephone interview from
            fire camp Tuesday afternoon after meeting with fire officials.
            Elsewhere in northcentral Washington, the Shady wildfire about
            12 miles northwest of Stehekin in North Cascades National Park
            remained at 109 acres and was reported 50 percent contained
            Tuesday, said fire spokesman Timothy Manns.
            About 85 firefighters were assigned to that blaze, with another
            20 expected Wednesday, Manns said.
            Officials suspected that fire was caused by a person.
            Gregoire expressed concern that severe drought conditions in
            central Washington could spell trouble for the rest of the summer.
            During a visit to Wenatchee last week, Gregoire noted that
            Wenatchee River levels were just 800 cubic feet per second. The
            river would normally be at 3,000 feet per second at this point of
            the summer, she said.
            "We're where we would normally be at the end of August and it's
            just the start," Gregoire said. "I think August will be a tough
            month for us."
            The Dirtyface fire started Saturday, apparently in a mobile
            home, before spreading to nearby brush on state-protected land and
            parts of the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, said Robin
            DeMario, spokeswoman for the U.S. Forest Service.
            Nothing remained of the mobile home, though no other structures
            have burned in the blaze.
            "The best thing that's happened here, frankly, is the local
            folks got on it immediately," Gregoire said. "The fact that it's
            grown as big as it has, it would be certainly worse if not for the
            immediate actions of firefighters here."

            (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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            • #51
              August 3rd

              LEAVENWORTH, Wash. (AP) - Hundreds of firefighters battling a
              blaze that has scorched nearly 1,000 acres near here continue to
              make progress in the face of increasingly hot weather.
              The Dirtyface fire, which forced residents of 75 homes near Lake
              Wenatchee to evacuate earlier this week, was 30 percent contained
              late Wednesday. The evacuated residents were allowed to return home
              Wednesday morning, fire spokeswoman Pam Novitzky said.
              About 300 firefighters, including some from as far away as
              Tennessee, were battling the fire, she said, adding temperatures as
              high as 100 were forecast in the area.
              Elsewhere in Washington, residents of nine homes near Elk
              Heights west of Ellensburg evacuated briefly on Wednesday because
              of a wildfire there.
              The fire, which started Wednesday afternoon and quickly scorched
              about 80 acres, burned through brush and timber about 15 miles west
              of Ellensburg on the east slope of the Cascade Mountains.
              Some of the homes were the same ones evacuated last summer due
              to a wildfire started by an arsonist. That fire burned three homes
              and forced the evacuation of hundreds.
              Those evacuated in the Ellensburg-area fire were allowed to
              return home late Wednesday, KOMO-TV in Seattle reported.
              The fire was believed to have started accidentally in a backyard
              firepit, said Kittitas County Undersheriff Clayton Myers said.
              The fire burned close to Interstate 90. No injuries were
              reported and no buildings were lost, Myers said.
              The Dirtyface fire continued to burn on the south slope of
              Dirtyface Mountain in Chelan County, about 10 miles northeast of
              Stevens Pass and 18 miles northwest of Leavenworth.
              The fire started Saturday, apparently in a mobile home, before
              spreading to nearby brush on state-protected land and parts of the
              Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. No injuries were reported, and
              no additional homes had burned.
              A new fire Wednesday in northcentral Washington forced
              intermittent closure of the North Cascades Highway in the Ross Lake
              National Recreation Area to allow helicopters to make water drops.
              That fire, reported by a National Park Service volunteer, was
              estimated at about seven acres and was moving up the slope of Davis
              Peak. When the fire moved beneath a Seattle City Light power line
              at the base of the mountain, the utility de-energized the line to
              permit water drops.
              The Shady wildfire about 12 miles northwest of Stehekin in North
              Cascades National Park remained at 109 acres and was reported 65
              percent contained Wednesday, park officials said in a news release.
              Due to the increasing wildfire danger, the Forest Service banned
              campfires on national forest lands in Kittitas and Yakima counties,
              beginning Thursday. In Chelan and Okanogan counties, campfires will
              be limited only to existing fire rings in designated campgrounds.
              The Olympic National Park also banned open fires in the
              wilderness backcountry, starting Thursday. Fires will be permitted
              only at established campgrounds.
              The state already had banned campfires on state land due to
              wildfire dangers.

              (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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              • #52
                August 7th

                POMEROY, Washington (AP) - Residents of at least 150 homes in
                southeastern Washington were forced to evacuate as a fire that had
                charred as much as 27,000 acres (10,800 hectares) moved north out
                of the Umatilla National Forest onto private land.
                Farmers beyond the flames were plowing up broad swaths of earth
                through fields of wheat and other crops, trying to create breaks to
                save this year's harvest, said Marc Hollen, spokesman for the
                Northwest Fire Coordination Center in Portland, Oregon.
                The leading edge of the fire, which had covered just 150 acres
                (60 hectares) on Saturday morning, was about 10 miles (16
                kilometers) south of this rural community, authorities said Sunday.
                "At the moment it's zero percent contained, burning vigorously
                in timber, grass and brush," said John Townsley, also of the
                Northwest Fire Coordination Center.
                A thick layer of smoke over the region grounded water tankers
                and helicopters for much of the day. There were no reports of
                injuries, but three structures have burned, officials said. It
                could not be immediately determined whether the structures were
                houses or sheds.
                The cause of the fire was not yet known. No lightning strikes
                were reported in the area Friday, when it started in tinder-dry
                conditions.
                In central Washington, a 1,075-acre (430-hectare) wildfire near
                Lake Wenatchee that had threatened 140 homes was 50 percent
                contained, said Patrick Lonergan, spokesman for the Central
                Washington Area Incident Management Team. He said he expected that
                fire to be fully contained by Wednesday.
                In Montana, officials have reopened a 90-mile (145-kilometer)
                section of a major highway, Interstate 90, that was shut down
                Friday night because of wildfires in the area.
                ---
                On the Net:
                National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

                (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                Comment


                • #53
                  August 8th morning update

                  POMEROY, Wash. (AP) - Wildfire managers around the state are
                  looking for ways to help the School fire near here, which has grown
                  to some 32,000 acres, forced the evacuation of about 175 homes and
                  burned about three dozen buildings.
                  "All of the fires are starting to look at what their resources
                  are and how they can help out," said spokesman John Townsley at
                  the Northwest Fire Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
                  Firefighters were expecting cooler, wetter weather in the next
                  few days as they attempt to contain the volatile fire's advance, he
                  said.
                  Farmers beyond the flames were plowing up broad swaths of earth
                  through fields of wheat and other crops, trying to create fire
                  breaks and save this year's harvest.
                  The fire covered about 150 acres Saturday morning, but flames
                  were moving fast through tinder-dry country. Smoke was making it
                  hard for fire managers to see the fire's perimeter.
                  The smoke also grounded water tankers and helicopters for much
                  of Sunday, and made it difficult to find burned structures.
                  Officials counted 35 torched buildings by Sunday evening, but
                  acknowledged that more may have been consumed.
                  "Right now there is so much smoke that it's difficult to see
                  very well, so unless a person knew the ground ... it might be easy
                  to miss," Townsley said.
                  There were no reports of injuries. It could not be immediately
                  determined whether the structures that burned were homes, sheds or
                  other buildings, Townsley said.
                  Towers of smoke indicated the fire was generating its own
                  weather, sending heavy drafts skyward that could also shoot burning
                  debris ahead of the front and push the blaze rapidly ahead,
                  Townsley said.
                  "It starts a sort of perpetual motion machine that just keeps
                  the fire moving and going," he said.
                  "The bigger the column, the more extreme the winds" inside the
                  blaze, he said, noting the smoke was visible in satellite photos of
                  the area.
                  Some 600 people were working the fire, along with about 75
                  engines.
                  Gov. Christine Gregoire accompanied State Patrol Chief John
                  Batiste on a flight to the area Sunday evening to assess the fire,
                  spokeswoman Althea Cawley-Murphree said.
                  Officials are not sure how the blaze began Friday, but managers
                  were sure it was not sparked by a lightning strike, Townsley said.
                  "We could easily see more of this if people aren't careful,"
                  Townsley said.
                  Aid also has been requested from the Federal Emergency
                  Management Agency "because of the threat to residences and
                  homes," he said. The affected homes are apparently scattered,
                  likely in drainages, he added. He said primary and recreational
                  homes probably were affected.
                  While other fires were burning around the state, "I think the
                  School fire is the dragon on the block right now," Townsley said
                  The fire is feeding on a variety of fuel types, Townsley said:
                  forest, brush, grass and some crop lands. Much of the fire was in
                  the Umatilla National Forest, but wind appeared to push the fire to
                  the north and east Sunday.
                  The fire burned into the Tuncannon River Canyon and jumped the
                  waterway as it roared north and east. Three campgrounds - Boundary,
                  Tuncannon and Alder Thicket - were evacuated.
                  Another new blaze, the Burnt Bread fire, had destroyed one barn
                  and covered about 1,300 acres in sparsely populated north-central
                  Washington, about 30 miles south of the U.S.-Canadian border,
                  Townsley said.
                  About 40 firefighters were assigned to that blaze, working with
                  two helicopters and 10 engines. Crews built a bulldozer line and
                  appeared to make good progress, but the fire could get more
                  dangerous if wind pushes it into forest land, Townsley said.
                  Updates on the state's other major fires:
                  -The Dirtyface fire near Lake Wenatchee, about 18 miles
                  northwest of Leavenworth, was reported 60 percent contained at
                  1,100 acres. About 100 homes had been evacuated and other area
                  residents were advised to be prepared for evacuation as hot, dry
                  weather continued. There were more than 650 firefighters at the
                  scene, working with trucks and helicopters to douse the fire and
                  strengthening fire lines near the Whispering Pines subdivision.
                  Fire crews hoped to have full containment by Wednesday.
                  -The Lick Creek fire near Cle Elum had charred about 670 acres
                  and was considered 20 percent contained. Residents of 30 homes on
                  the north fork of the Teanaway Creek were evacuated. About 490
                  firefighters were on it, and found that relatively wet grasslands
                  were helping containment efforts, Townsley said.

                  (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                  Comment


                  • #54
                    August 9th evening update

                    POMEROY, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters battling a 41,000-acre
                    wildfire in southeastern Washington said they had established good
                    lines around three sides of it and were working to hold their gains
                    against the wind.
                    The fire was moving more slowly Tuesday, although humidity
                    remained low and temperatures were in the mid-90s, said Earl
                    Bassett, a fire crew spokesman. Officials said they had the fire
                    about 35 percent contained.
                    More than 1,600 firefighters were working on the wildfire, which
                    has destroyed more than 100 residences over the weekend. Officials
                    said the structures included hunting cabins, vacation homes and
                    pads for recreational vehicles.
                    The fire, which started Friday, continued to burn into rougher
                    terrain in the Umatilla National Forest.
                    Elsewhere, nearly 850 people were fighting wildfires burning
                    along Interstate 90 in western Montana near the Idaho border that
                    had grown to 4,300 acres.
                    An air tanker was assigned to the Montana fires to help protect
                    a major Bonneville Power Administration line that supplies
                    electricity to the Pacific Northwest.
                    So far this year, wildfires have charred 5.1 million acres
                    nationwide, compared to 5.6 million acres at the same time last
                    year.
                    ---
                    On the Net:
                    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

                    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                    Comment


                    • #55
                      August 10th

                      POMEROY, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters made slow, steady progress
                      Wednesday on a massive southeastern Washington wildfire that has
                      burned more than 100 cabins while a new fire in northeast
                      Washington prompted the evacuation of a handful of homes.
                      Elsewhere in the eastern part of the state, lightning caused
                      several new wildfires.
                      A new 500-acre fire northeast of Davenport threatened six homes,
                      which were evacuated, said Steve Harris, a state Department of
                      Natural Resources spokesman. The cause of that fire, which started
                      Wednesday, was not immediately known. Davenport is located west of
                      Spokane.
                      About 1,400 firefighters and support personnel were assigned to
                      the School fire near Pomeroy. It stood at 42,000 acres Wednesday
                      and was 40 percent contained, fire spokesman Greg Smith said.
                      Crews continued to mop up areas east, north and west of the
                      fire, and were working to protect structures to the south in the
                      Umatilla National Forest.
                      "We feel like we accomplished a lot today," Smith said.
                      U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris, R-Wash., attended a Wednesday night
                      public meeting in Pomeroy that fire officials organized to answer
                      questions and outline firefighting plans, Smith said. It was the
                      third such meeting this week.
                      Lightning was a problem in northcentral Washington, where at
                      least two new fires were started by a storm that blew through the
                      region Tuesday night.
                      More than 230 lightning strikes hit the Okanogan Valley, said
                      Mark Pepin, fire spokesman for the Okanogan National Forest. The
                      storm started one blaze in the Okanogan National Forest, called the
                      Middle Fork fire.
                      Eight smoke jumpers were dropped to fight the fire, which stood
                      at about 30 acres. More firefighters were expected to report to the
                      fire Wednesday.
                      Engines from the Burnt Bread fire, 21 miles southeast of
                      Tonasket, were sent to help with the initial attack on another
                      lightning-caused fire west of town, said fire spokeswoman Cindy
                      Reichelt. Crews were working to build a line around the 40-acre
                      fire Wednesday.
                      State Department of Natural Resources dispatcher Lynn Kenworthy
                      said fire officials expected to discover other new fires from the
                      storm.
                      About 275 people still were assigned to the Burnt Bread fire,
                      which was 75 percent contained Wednesday at about 1,352 acres. The
                      cause was under investigation.
                      The 1,150-acre Dirty Face Fire, 18 miles northwest of
                      Leavenworth, was 70 percent contained, said spokesman Patrick
                      Lonergan. About 480 firefighters were assigned to the fire.
                      The 735-acre Lick Creek fire near Cle Elum was estimated at
                      about 75 percent containment with full containment expected by the
                      weekend. The fire was believed to have been caused by logging
                      equipment that caught fire Aug. 4.
                      No fire-related injuries were reported in the state Wednesday.
                      In southcentral Washington, crews battled a 400-acre fire about
                      20 miles northeast of Richland. The McClane fire began Tuesday when
                      agricultural burning spread to wildlands. The fire, which had
                      burned onto the Hanford Reach National Monument in some marshy
                      areas off the Columbia River, was about 40 percent contained
                      Wednesday, according to the Northwest Interagency Coordination
                      Center.
                      The cause of the School fire near Pomeroy remained under
                      investigation Wednesday. About 100 homes remained evacuated, but
                      fire officials could not say how many of those homes were full-time
                      residences or seasonal cabins.
                      Garfield County officials estimated that more than 100
                      residences burned in the fire last weekend, mostly hunting cabins,
                      vacation homes or pads for recreational vehicles.
                      Fire crew figures for residences burned have been lower than the
                      county's figures but Smith said Wednesday evening his records now
                      show 49 residences destroyed and another 38 outbuildings burned -
                      for a total of 87 buildings - with more areas still to be checked.
                      Gov. Christine Gregoire urged residents to be careful when
                      returning to fire-damaged structures.
                      "I know everyone is anxious to return home so they can
                      determine the extent of the damage," Gregoire said in a news
                      release. "Protecting lives and communities is my top priority, and
                      I urge everyone to use extra caution before entering structures
                      damaged by fire."

                      (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                      • #56
                        August 15th

                        POMEROY, Wash. (AP) - Fire crews had to contend with summer heat
                        and rough terrain to encircle a 49,000-acre wildfire, the largest
                        in the Lower 48 states.
                        The fire in southeastern Washington has destroyed more than 100
                        homes and more than 100 outbuildings about 15 miles south of
                        Pomeroy. It was second in size only to an 82,000-acre blaze in
                        Alaska.
                        Fire officials estimated the blaze was 65 percent contained
                        Monday but could not say when it might be brought under control.
                        "We have two miles of line left to build but those are a couple
                        of rugged miles," said spokesman Julian Rhinehart.
                        A break in the weather could come Wednesday, when a low-pressure
                        system is expected to bring rain, though lightning was also
                        possible, he said.
                        In western Montana, crews fighting an 11,000-acre blaze near
                        Alberton were helped by cool, moist weather. That fire, which began
                        as two blazes along Interstate 90, was 70 percent contained Monday,
                        with full containment possible by Thursday.
                        Authorities said they were going to interview a man who was seen
                        stopped along I-90 at the time the fire started, possibly with
                        vehicle problems. Officials believe the blazes were sparked by a
                        malfunctioning vehicle or arson.
                        Forest Service spokeswoman Paula Nelson said the man was not
                        considered a suspect.
                        "We want to ask him what he saw or knows," Nelson said. "Did
                        he see a trailer going by dragging anything? Any suspicious people?
                        He might not know anything at all."
                        The National Interagency Fire Center said 28 large fires
                        totaling 290,000 acres were active Monday in Alaska, Arizona,
                        Arkansas, California, Idaho, Minnesota, Montana, Nevada, Oregon and
                        Washington. So far this year, wildfires have charred 5.89 million
                        acres nationwide, compared with 5.95 million acres at the same time
                        last year.
                        ---
                        On the Net:
                        National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

                        (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                        • #57
                          August 16th

                          POMEROY, Wash. (AP) - Fire crews continued to mop up and check
                          for hot spots on a 49,000-acre fire that burned more than 200
                          structures in southeastern Washington.
                          The School fire remained at 75 percent containment Tuesday.
                          Firefighters had not yet estimated a date for full containment,
                          said Barrie McVey, fire spokeswoman.
                          More than 1,300 firefighters were still assigned to the blaze,
                          using infrared equipment to check for hot spots and building a
                          300-foot line around structures for protection, McVey said.
                          "Things are going well. We've got the winds that are going to
                          again be influenced by the terrain. We're working on tying in the
                          remaining fire line and mop up is in heavy use," McVey said.
                          The fire started Aug. 5. Cause was under investigation.
                          More than 200 structures - 109 residences and 106 outbuildings -
                          were destroyed by the fire. Residents of more than 100 additional
                          houses and seasonal cabins remained evacuated Tuesday, though McVey
                          said fire crews were closer to preparing a plan for allowing
                          residents to return home.
                          Elsewhere, fire crews declared the Harker Canyon fire west of
                          Spokane fully contained Monday morning. The fire, about nine miles
                          west of Davenport and 150 miles north of the School fire, had
                          burned 1,566 acres and was the only other large fire remaining in
                          Washington state.

                          (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                          • #58
                            Sept 8th

                            Homes evacuated, structure burns in Okanogan County wildfire
                            PATEROS, Wash. (AP) - A fast-moving wildfire in northcentral
                            Washington forced the evacuation of six homes Thursday evening,
                            threatened 10 more and burned one building, the Okanogan County
                            emergency manager said.
                            The wildland grass and tree fire about seven miles northwest of
                            here started about 4 p.m. Thursday and was estimated at 600 acres
                            by late Thursday night, Scott Miller said.
                            Miller said one structure had been destroyed, adding he believed
                            it was some type of residence. It was not occupied.
                            No injuries were reported in the Squaw Creek fire.
                            About 150 local firefighters were fighting the blaze and state
                            fire assistance was authorized Thursday night by State Patrol Chief
                            John Batiste. The state was sending 45 firefighters, 20 engines and
                            four water tenders.
                            In addition to the six homes under mandatory evacuation,
                            residents of another 10 homes were warned that they might have to
                            leave, Miller said.
                            The cause of the fire was under investigation, he said.
                            A section of State Highway 153 in the area was closed Thursday
                            night, Miller said.

                            (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                            • #59
                              Washington 2006

                              WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - Soldiers from Fort Lewis were receiving
                              additional training Tuesday before being sent to the front lines of
                              two fires that have blackened more than 140 square miles in north
                              central Washington state.
                              The 550 U.S. Army troops from Task Force Blaze, commanded by Lt.
                              Colonel Ricky Love, arrived in the area late Monday and were to
                              receive an additional two days of training before joining line
                              operations on Thursday, the U.S. Forest Service said.
                              The Tripod Complex of fires between Winthrop and Conconully grew
                              to nearly 90,000 acres Monday.
                              The troops received basic fire training at Fort Lewis and will
                              be assigned to 20-person crews to mop-up, build fire lines and
                              patrol for hotspots.
                              "We appreciate the military's approval of this request,
                              considering their other current taskings," said Karyn Wood, a
                              spokeswoman at the National Interagency Fire Center at Boise,
                              Idaho. "Adding 25 fresh crews to the mix of resources will really
                              help us make progress on the Tripod Complex."
                              A shortage of local firefighting crews and unfavorable weather
                              forecasts prompted the fire center in Boise to request help last
                              week. Soldiers are expected be deployed for about two months, said
                              Army Maj. Cathy Wilkinson, a 1st Corps plans and operations
                              officer.
                              By Tuesday morning, crews had dug lines around 25 percent of the
                              Tripod and Spur Peak fires, which officials said had not merged, as
                              they originally estimated earlier this month.
                              The fires are in the Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forest,
                              with the northeast corner spread in the Loomis State Forest.
                              Mike Ferris, spokesman for the Pacific Northwest Incident
                              Management Team, said the south part of the fire that had been
                              threatening Winthrop was secure.
                              There are more than 2,330 firefighters assigned to the blazes
                              caused by July lightning strikes.
                              In central Washington, the Flick Creek fire near Stehekin on
                              Lake Chelan was 50 percent trailed Tuesday at about 4,350 acres, or
                              about 6.7 square miles. Almost two dozen firefighters were on the
                              scene.
                              Crews were managing the 4,523-acre Tinpan fire along the Entiat
                              River trail as a wildland-use fire, meaning it will be allowed to
                              burn naturally unless it threatens to run outside preset
                              boundaries.
                              The fire has burned 40 miles northwest of the town of Entiat in
                              the Glacier Peak Wilderness. About 170 personnel were assigned to
                              the fire.

                              (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                              • #60
                                August 16th

                                WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - Cooler temperatures and rising humidity
                                on Wednesday helped dampen two major wildfires being fought in
                                northcentral Washington state.
                                The Tripod Complex of fires between Winthrop and Conconully had
                                blackened nearly 95,000 acres, or more than 148 square miles of the
                                Wenatchee and Okanogan National Forests. Nearly 3,000 firefighters,
                                including 550 U.S. Army soldiers from Fort Lewis near Tacoma, were
                                assigned to the 41,938-acre Tripod Fire and the 52,900-acre Spur
                                Peak Fire.
                                Firefighters reported more smoke from previously unburned
                                islands of fuel now burning within the fire perimeter, but they did
                                not believe the fire had grown, said Ron DeHart, spokesman for the
                                Okanogan and Wenatchee National Forests.
                                "There also are possibly some areas near our containment lines
                                that have flared up," DeHart said. "We don't think we're seeing
                                any expansion or growth. There may be some, we just don't know
                                yet."
                                The fire was 25 percent contained.
                                On Wednesday, crews lit "burnout" fires near Ramsey Peak,
                                South Twentymile Peak, and in the Bromas Creek areas to burn fuel
                                between the main fire and fire lines, Forest Service spokeswoman
                                Deborah L. Kelly said.
                                Fort Lewis soldiers continued to train in wildland fire
                                suppression techniques on Wednesday and were expected to be sent to
                                fire lines on Thursday.
                                The fires were sparked by lightning in July.
                                The 4,523-acre Tinpan fire along the Entiat River trail in the
                                Glacier Peak Wilderness continued to be managed as a wildland-use
                                fire, meaning it will be allowed to burn naturally unless it
                                threatens to run outside preset boundaries.
                                Elsewhere, the Flick Creek fire near Stehekin along Lake Chelan
                                had blackened about 4,380 acres, or about 6.7 square miles. About
                                two dozen firefighters were digging trail around the blaze. The
                                fire was 50 percent contained.
                                About two weeks ago, the fire nearly forced the evacuation of
                                Stehekin, which is only reachable by boat, floatplane, horse or on
                                foot. The isolated community is the only town in Washington state
                                that sits outside a fire protection district.
                                Gov. Chris Gregoire visited residents to urge them to create a
                                district, saying the state can't help them during wildland fire
                                emergencies unless they are in a fire district. Residents now have
                                begun circulating a petition to form such a district. Chelan County
                                commissioners set a Sept. 12 hearing to establish the boundaries,
                                set a proposed levy rate and pick an election date.

                                (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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