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  • #31
    July 27th

    ELLENSBURG, Wash. (AP) - Residents evacuated by a wildfire
    between Cle Elum and Ellensburg in central Washington were allowed
    to return home Tuesday after firefighters gained better control of
    the fire.
    Firefighters expect to fully contain the 250-acre Lauderdale
    fire on Wednesday. The fire broke out Sunday afternoon along
    Highway 97 about 6 miles east of Cle Elum near Lookout Mountain.
    Residents evacuated from 27 homes in the area were allowed to
    return home Tuesday, said Dale Warriner, a fire information
    officer.
    The fire destroyed two cabins, including a tin structure. About
    300 firefighters were mopping up the fire Tuesday. Eighty were
    expected to be released on Wednesday, Warriner said.
    The cause of the fire remained under investigation.
    Fire bosses at the SiSi Ridge fire, burning 7 miles west of
    Stehekin, near Lake Chelan, planned to fly in hotshot crews. But so
    far, fire officials said the 340-acre fire is not threatening the
    community.
    Lightning started the fire July 19. It is now being managed as
    part of a complex that includes the 15,000-acre Pot Peak fire,
    about 15 miles northwest of Chelan in the Okanogan and Wenatchee
    National Forests.
    Lightning started the Pot Peak fire started June 26. It was 75
    percent contained but was continuing to burn inside the fire lines.
    Elsewhere in Washington, the 200-acre Downey Creek fire,
    apparently caused by lightning, was burning on the edge of the
    Glacier Peak Wilderness about 16 miles east of Darrington in the
    Cascades.
    No firefighters were assigned to the blaze, since it was not
    threatening any structures or campgrounds, said Roger Peterson, a
    spokesman for the Northwest Interagency Coordination Center.

    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

    APTV 07-27-04 2058EDT
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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    • #32
      July 29th

      CHELAN, Wash. (AP) - The Deep Harbor wildfire grew overnight
      from 290 acres to about 2,300 and burned through two campgrounds on
      the south shore of Lake Chelan, a Forest Service spokeswoman said
      Thursday.
      The campgrounds are about 35 miles northwest of here.
      The campgrounds at Graham Creek and Graham Harbor Creek,
      reachable only by boat, had previously been swathed in
      fire-protective wrap by firefighters, but the blaze burned the dock
      and picnic shelter at Graham Harbor Creek, spokeswoman Pam Sichting
      said.
      No injuries were reported.
      Deep Harbor, part of the Pot Peak-Sisi Ridge complex of
      wildfires northwest of the town of Chelan, was started by lightning
      on July 19, as was Sisi Ridge. The Pot Peak fire, about 15 miles
      northwest of here, was started by lightning June 26.
      On Thursday night, the Deep Harbor fire was threatening the
      Corral Creek and Big Creek campgrounds on Lake Chelan, about 4
      miles southeast of the ones that burned, Sichting said. Rangers
      have closed the campgrounds.
      Winds have been pushing the blaze to the southeast, she said.
      No towns were threatened by any of the fires. The Deep Harbor
      blaze did not affect boating on Lake Chelan, except for the noted
      campground closures, the Forest Service said.
      As of Thursday evening, the Sisi Ridge fire, about 8 miles west
      of Stehekin, had burned across 345 acres and was 50 percent
      contained while Pot Peak had burned 15,500 acres and was 75 percent
      contained.
      In all, 625 firefighters were working on the three fires,
      Sichting said.
      In Western Washington, a smoky brush fire along Interstate 90
      that threatened several homes temporarily closed the freeway's
      eastbound lanes near North Bend on Thursday evening.
      The fire broke out around 4 p.m. and was contained about 5 p.m.,
      said Josie Williams, a spokeswoman for Eastside Fire and Rescue.
      Residents of about 14 houses in the nearby Cedar Village
      development of 132 homes were warned about the approaching flames,
      Williams said.
      No homes were damaged and no injuries were reported.
      The fire burned alongside the eastbound lanes between Exits 32
      and 34 - roughly 30 miles east of Seattle.
      The cause was under investigation.

      (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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      • #33
        August 2nd

        CHELAN, Wash. (AP) - Fire officials on Monday relaxed an
        evacuation order for about 100 residents near Lake Chelan, where
        wildfires have been burning for weeks.
        The Deep Harbor fire, one of three fires in the complex, had
        burned about 23,100 acres with 30 percent containment as of Monday
        night, said Winston Rall, a fire information officer.
        Firefighters had spent the weekend digging new fire lines and
        burning out areas between the lines and the fire, said Pam
        Sichting, another spokeswoman.
        Monday morning, fire officials relaxed the evacuation order to
        allow residents to return home if they must leave for some reason,
        she said. Previously, residents who refused to evacuate could not
        leave their homes and then return.
        About 900 firefighters were assigned to the fire complex in
        central Washington. The Pot Peak fire held steady at 15,500 acres
        and was 85 percent contained. The Sisi Ridge fire was 360 acres, 90
        percent contained.
        All three fires in the complex were started by lightning - the
        Pot Peak fire on June 26 and the Deep Harbor and Sisi Ridge fires
        on July 19. The Deep Harbor fire burned a dock and picnic shelter
        at a campground.
        Aided by a Monday night wind and thunder storm, the Mill Canyon
        fire 25 miles northwest of Spokane began spreading north along the
        deep canyon.
        "We evacuated a few people out," said Dale Warriner, a state
        Department of Natural Resources spokesman. He did not have specific
        figures.
        As many as eight homes could be in the fire's path.
        Some 60 state fire crews arrived Monday to relieve local
        firefighters who had been battling the Mill Canyon fire, estimated
        at 700 acres. It started Sunday.
        Active wildfires in Washington state have burned across more
        than 40,000 acres.
        The Elk Heights fire between Cle Elum and Ellensburg held at 370
        acres Monday night with 90 percent containment despite stubborn 30
        mph winds, fire information officer Cynthia Reichelt said.
        The fire had burned two homes and a workshop about 5 miles
        northwest of Thorp, between state Highway 10 and Interstate 90. It
        was believed to have been set by a serial arsonist on Friday,
        making it the 11th blaze started by a firebug in central
        Washington's Kittitas County in the past two months.
        The fire has been threatening about 230 homes along its
        perimeter, but about 100 evacuated residents were allowed to return
        home Sunday.
        About 260 firefighters were working on it. No injuries were
        reported.
        A 1,930-acre fire burning a mile southeast of Elmer City in
        northcentral Washington was expected to be fully contained Tuesday.
        The human-caused fire, which started last week, destroyed one
        outbuilding.
        The Rattlesnake Peak fire 40 miles west of Yakima has burned
        about 373 acres. The lightning-caused fire was burning in heavy
        fuel in an area that had not burned for 60 years.

        (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #34
          August 3rd

          CHELAN, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters were worried Tuesday about the
          possibility of new fires after storms swept across Eastern
          Washington, pounding the region with lightning strikes.
          About 1,500 lightning strikes were reported across Washington
          state during an overnight storm Tuesday, with most of them east of
          the Cascades, said Roger Peterson, spokesman for the Northwest
          Interagency Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
          Smoldering fires caused by lightning could linger for days
          before they are spotted, he said.
          "There's definitely that potential, and local resources will be
          definitely watching for that over the next couple of days,"
          Peterson said. "The local crews so far this year have been very
          successful on initial attack and keeping those fires small. That's
          been the good news."
          Strengthened by winds, the Mill Canyon fire 25 miles northwest
          of Spokane forced the evacuation of 12 residences, said Dale
          Warriner, a state Department of Natural Resources spokesman.
          He did not have an exact number of how many people had been
          evacuated. About 100 firefighters were assigned to the human-caused
          fire, which was estimated at 1,100 acres and was 55 percent
          contained.
          Gusts of up to 30 mph threw sparks across fire lines at the
          23,120-acre Deep Harbor fire near Lake Chelan, starting four new
          blazes that firefighters scrambled to put out early Tuesday.
          "That kind of gave our night crew a little bit of fits," fire
          spokesman Greg Thayer said.
          Containment was estimated at 35 percent Tuesday night. Two other
          fires in the same complex had not grown: the Pot Peak fire remained
          at 15,500 acres, while the Sisi Ridge fire was at 360 acres.
          About 900 firefighters were assigned to the fire complex.
          All three fires in the complex were started by lightning - the
          Pot Peak fire on June 26 and the Deep Harbor and Sisi Ridge fires
          on July 19. The Deep Harbor fire burned a dock and picnic shelter
          at a campground.
          The Elk Heights fire between Cle Elum and Ellensburg held at 370
          acres Tuesday with 90 percent containment. Crews hoped to have the
          fire fully contained Wednesday, incident commander Dave Johnson
          said.
          The fire burned two homes and a shop about 5 miles northwest of
          Thorp, between state Highway 10 and Interstate 90. It was believed
          to have been set by a serial arsonist on Friday, making it the 11th
          blaze started by a firebug in central Washington's Kittitas County
          in the past two months.
          A 1,930-acre fire burning a mile southeast of Elmer City was
          fully contained Tuesday, while the Rattlesnake Peak fire 40 miles
          west of Yakima had burned about 560 acres. The lightning-caused
          fire was burning in heavy fuel in an area that had not burned for
          60 years.
          Officials also reported a new fire in a remote area of the
          Glacier Peak Wilderness. About 10 firefighters were working the
          Papoose Creek fire.

          (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment


          • #35
            August 4th

            CHELAN, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters were worried Tuesday about the
            possibility of new fires after storms swept across Eastern
            Washington, pounding the region with lightning strikes.
            About 1,500 lightning strikes were reported across Washington
            state during an overnight storm Tuesday, with most of them east of
            the Cascades, said Roger Peterson, spokesman for the Northwest
            Interagency Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
            Smoldering fires caused by lightning could linger for days
            before they are spotted, he said.
            "There's definitely that potential, and local resources will be
            definitely watching for that over the next couple of days,"
            Peterson said. "The local crews so far this year have been very
            successful on initial attack and keeping those fires small. That's
            been the good news."
            Strengthened by winds, the Mill Canyon fire 25 miles northwest
            of Spokane forced the evacuation of 12 residences, said Dale
            Warriner, a state Department of Natural Resources spokesman.
            He did not have an exact number of how many people had been
            evacuated. About 100 firefighters were assigned to the human-caused
            fire, which was estimated at 1,100 acres and was 55 percent
            contained.
            Gusts of up to 30 mph threw sparks across fire lines at the
            23,120-acre Deep Harbor fire near Lake Chelan, starting four new
            blazes that firefighters scrambled to put out early Tuesday.
            "That kind of gave our night crew a little bit of fits," fire
            spokesman Greg Thayer said.
            Containment was estimated at 35 percent Tuesday night. Two other
            fires in the same complex had not grown: the Pot Peak fire remained
            at 15,500 acres, while the Sisi Ridge fire was at 360 acres.
            About 900 firefighters were assigned to the fire complex.
            All three fires in the complex were started by lightning - the
            Pot Peak fire on June 26 and the Deep Harbor and Sisi Ridge fires
            on July 19. The Deep Harbor fire burned a dock and picnic shelter
            at a campground.
            The Elk Heights fire between Cle Elum and Ellensburg held at 370
            acres Tuesday with 90 percent containment. Crews hoped to have the
            fire fully contained Wednesday, incident commander Dave Johnson
            said.
            The fire burned two homes and a shop about 5 miles northwest of
            Thorp, between state Highway 10 and Interstate 90. It was believed
            to have been set by a serial arsonist on Friday, making it the 11th
            blaze started by a firebug in central Washington's Kittitas County
            in the past two months.
            A 1,930-acre fire burning a mile southeast of Elmer City was
            fully contained Tuesday, while the Rattlesnake Peak fire 40 miles
            west of Yakima had burned about 560 acres. The lightning-caused
            fire was burning in heavy fuel in an area that had not burned for
            60 years.
            Officials also reported a new fire in a remote area of the
            Glacier Peak Wilderness. About 10 firefighters were working the
            Papoose Creek fire.

            (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

            Comment


            • #36
              August 9th

              DRYDEN, Wash. (AP) - About 200 firefighters continued battling a
              fire Tuesday that forced a mandatory evacuation of 38 homes near
              Dryden in north-central Washington.
              The Fischer fire held to more than 200 acres overnight, said
              Doug Bowie, a spokesman for the Okanogan and Wenatchee National
              Forests.
              "They got a lot of good work done yesterday. They felt they
              were making some progress," Bowie said.
              On Monday, fire officials estimated the fire had burned between
              250 and 300 acres.
              The fire started Sunday evening about 20 miles northwest of
              Wenatchee. It was burning on private, state and national forest
              land. Flaming trees were visible to drivers along U.S. Highway 2
              between Leavenworth and Dryden.
              Its cause was unknown.
              Twenty homes in Derby Canyon and 18 homes in Williams Canyon
              were evacuated, said Robin DeMario, spokeswoman for the Okanogan
              and Wenatchee National Forests. No structures had burned.
              The Red Cross opened a shelter at a middle school in
              Leavenworth. Air tankers were dropping thousands of gallons of
              retardant, and helicopters were called in to drop water on the
              edges of the fire and on hot spots.
              Helicopters also were called in to drop water on a fire that
              started Monday afternoon on the Oak Creek Wildlife Refuge, about 20
              miles northwest of Yakima.
              No homes were evacuated, but the fire grew rapidly and was
              estimated at about 1,000 acres, said Rand Kapral, communications
              center manager for the southeast district of the state Department
              of Natural Resources and the Okanogan and Wenatchee National
              Forests.
              The cause of that fire also was unknown.
              Near Lake Chelan, firefighters continued to monitor a complex of
              three fires that have been burning for weeks. The Pot Peak-Sisi
              Ridge complex remained at 46,970 acres and was 85 percent
              contained.
              Firefighters were patrolling the Pot Peak and Sisi Ridge fires
              by air. Officials were still urging caution for residents near the
              Deep Harbor fire, which has grown to 29,500 acres and was 80
              percent contained.
              About 485 firefighters were assigned to the three fires.
              Warm, dry conditions were expected for the next several days,
              said Lori Hammer, fire information officer.
              "Right now, we're maintaining the level of resources we're at,
              and we're just going to hold tight for the next couple of days and
              see what the weather brings," Hammer said.
              One injury - a firefighter who fell and broke a wrist - was
              reported over the weekend, Hammer said.
              All three fires in the complex were started by lightning - the
              Pot Peak fire on June 26 and the Deep Harbor and Sisi Ridge fires
              on July 19. The Deep Harbor fire burned a dock and picnic shelter
              at a campground.
              Seventy firefighters were assigned to the Rattlesnake Peak fire
              about 40 miles west of Yakima. By Monday morning, the
              lightning-caused fire had burned about 730 acres of heavy fuel in
              an area that had not burned for 60 years.
              Firefighters also were mopping up five small fires burning south
              of Mount Adams. The lightning-caused fires were burning in dense,
              heavy fuel about 10 miles north of Trout Lake.

              (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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              • #37
                August 17th

                DRYDEN, Wash. (AP) - High winds prompted emergency officials to
                evacuate two more canyons late Tuesday where residences were
                threatened by the Fischer fire, which has already forced hundreds
                from their homes.
                Firefighters scrambled during the day after lightning storms
                swept through central Washington, igniting 18 fires in the Okanogan
                and Wenatchee National Forests alone.
                One of the largest of the new lightning-caused fires, Williams
                Butte, ballooned to 600 acres in one day northwest of the town of
                Twisp in northcentral Washington.
                But it was the Fischer fire 20 miles northwest of Wenatchee that
                posed the most risk. More than 1,500 firefighters were assigned to
                the blaze, which had charred about 8,500 acres since Aug. 8 on
                private, state and national forest land. It was human-caused.
                More than 325 homes in several other canyons were evacuated
                earlier and residents in more than 200 homes were on notice they
                might have to flee, said Robin Vora, fire information officer.
                The number of new evacuations remained unclear Tuesday night.
                Earlier Tuesday, the Fischer fire had crossed a road near Ollala
                Canyon, one of the evacuated areas, but firefighters were able to
                protect homes there, said Penny Hulse, a fire information officer.
                No structures had burned as of late Tuesday, and no injuries
                were reported.
                Firefighters struggled to maintain control of several fires
                after thunderstorms swept through the region late Monday and early
                Tuesday, bringing high winds and lightning.
                The new Williams Butte fire 17 miles northwest of Twisp prompted
                fire crews to evacuate 25 people from trailheads and campgrounds,
                said fire information officer Cynthia Reichelt.
                About 60 firefighters were battling that fire, burning just
                inside the Sawtooth Wilderness.
                The nearest homes were about five miles away. Crews on Wednesday
                planned to start wrapping campground facilities and old mining
                cabins in protective wrap to safeguard them from the flames, she
                said.
                The Monday night thunderstorms brought heavy rain to some areas,
                resulting in mudslides that temporarily trapped 65 people and their
                vehicles on the North Cascades Highway, northwest of Rainy Pass.
                No one was injured in the slides. The stranded included 40
                motorists, 25 firefighters and their vehicles. Crews were able to
                open a single lane to traffic so those individuals could drive out
                early Tuesday morning, said Jeff Adamson, spokesman for the state
                Transportation Department.
                "Some of them decided they were still on vacation and it wasn't
                raining, so they decided to stay and continue camping," Adamson
                said.
                He did not know how many vacationers decided to stay.
                In the Colockum Wildlife Area south of Wenatchee, firefighters
                were battling two new fires that were burning in heavy timber. More
                than 20 firefighters were battling the larger of the two, the
                15-acre Mission Peak fire, which was started by lightning Monday on
                the back side of Mission Ridge.
                The Naches Ranger District was tracking three new fires, two of
                which were burning in the William O. Douglas Wilderness area.
                Elsewhere, about 500 firefighters were assigned to the Pot
                Peak-Sisi Ridge complex of three fires, which have blackened a
                total of 47,390 acres near Lake Chelan and were 85 percent
                contained.
                The lightning-caused Dirty Face fire near Lake Wenatchee was
                estimated at 171 acres Tuesday. The fire was burning in very steep
                terrain in a mix of heavy brush and timber.
                About 65 firefighters were assigned to the lightning-caused
                Rattlesnake Peak fire, which has burned 750 acres about 40 miles
                west of Yakima.

                (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

                APTV 08-18-04 0048EDT
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                • #38
                  August 19th Update

                  DRYDEN, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters got a break in the weather as
                  they tried to hold the line against a wildfire threatening hundreds
                  of homes near this town in central Washington's Cascade foothills.
                  The Fischer fire about 20 miles northwest of Wenatchee was
                  estimated at 15,830 acres Thursday morning. High winds that had
                  pushed the fire into dry brush and grass subsided slightly
                  Wednesday, enabling firefighters to build better fire lines, fire
                  information officer Gail Roberts said.
                  Gov. Gary Locke was scheduled to visit the fire command center
                  in Leavenworth on Thursday.
                  Firefighters labored to protect structures in canyons that
                  remained evacuated as the fire burned to the east. In Hay Canyon,
                  crews cut back brush, moved woodpiles away from homes and wrapped
                  some houses with protective foil.
                  More than 300 homes were under a mandatory evacuation order, and
                  residents of hundreds of other homes remained on notice they might
                  also have to leave, Roberts said.
                  Fire crews were trying to build a fire line up Hay Canyon and a
                  tie-in with Ollala Canyon to encircle the fire around Tibbetts
                  Mountain.
                  About 200 people came to Cashmere High School on Wednesday night
                  to hear a report from Chelan County sheriff's deputies and state
                  and federal forest officials on the fire, she said.
                  More than 1,500 firefighters were assigned to the human-caused
                  blaze, which has been burning since Aug. 8 on private, state and
                  national land. No one has been injured.
                  The blaze was 30 percent contained.
                  In Tieton, northwest of Yakima, a fire that burned three fruit
                  warehouses, three ammonia tanks and a propane tank remained under
                  investigation.
                  The fire started Tuesday night in cardboard packaging stored
                  next to CPC International Apple Co., and 150 people were evacuated
                  after when high winds carried embers a mile away and ignited grass
                  fires.
                  Deanna Latham, a secretary for CPC International for seven years
                  who lives across the street from one of the warehouses, voluntarily
                  left her home as soon as she saw the flames.
                  "It was scary. We were just hoping the wind didn't shift," she
                  said.
                  CPC International president Peter Hancock vowed to rebuild. With
                  about 300 workers, the company is the largest employer in this town
                  of about 1,100.
                  The company has been operating nonstop through the apple
                  harvest. Company officials were working to negotiate leases with
                  the owners of several unused fruit packing buildings so employees
                  could immediately get back to work, Hancock said.
                  Elsewhere, firefighters continued to battle several wildfires
                  started by lightning.
                  Rain extinguished three of seven small fires ignited by
                  lightning on the east side of Mount Rainier National Park. The four
                  remaining fires were burning in spruce, fir and huckleberry. All
                  park roads and trails remained open.
                  The Williams Butte fire, just inside the Sawtooth Wilderness 17
                  miles northwest of Twisp, grew to about 720 acres Wednesday. About
                  300 people were assigned to the blaze, information officer Troy
                  Kinghorn said.
                  About 500 firefighters were assigned to the Pot Peak-Sisi Ridge
                  complex of three fires, which have blackened a total of 47,470
                  acres near Lake Chelan and were 85 percent contained as of late
                  Wednesday.
                  The Dirty Face fire near Lake Wenatchee was estimated at 295
                  acres of heavy brush and timber in very steep terrain. The fire was
                  55 percent contained Thursday morning.
                  About 30 firefighters were assigned to the Rattlesnake Peak
                  fire, which has burned 775 acres about 40 miles west of Yakima.

                  (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    WENATCHEE, Wash. (AP) - The U.S. Forest Service plans to bill an
                    18-year-old Peshastin man about $10 million for the amount spent to
                    suppress a 16,439-acre wildfire.
                    The Fischer fire destroyed one home as it burned near the towns
                    of Cashmere and Peshastin in central Washington. Witnesses said
                    they saw three motorized dirt bikes heading up a hill in Fischer
                    Canyon on Aug. 8, shortly before the fire started.
                    Last month, the Chelan County Sheriff's Office cited one of the
                    three riders, Ryan Unger, for operating an off-road vehicle without
                    a spark arrester, as required by law, and negligent starting of a
                    fire.
                    The Forest Service is required to try to recover fire
                    suppression costs. That amounts to roughly two-thirds of the $14.9
                    million required to extinguish the blaze, said Maureen Hanson,
                    administrative officer for the Okanogan and Wenatchee National
                    Forest.
                    The state Department of Natural Resources paid about one-third
                    of the suppression costs. An agency spokesman in Ellensburg said
                    the state had not yet decided whether to pursue the case.
                    "It's not something we take pleasure in," Hanson said. "We
                    understand a lot of these people don't go out to start a fire. It's
                    not malicious and it's not intentional."
                    Steve DeFolo, the financial manager for the Okanogan and
                    Wenatchee National Forests, said the Forest Service usually works
                    with an individual's insurance company to negotiate a settlement.
                    "We do provide a copy of a form to fill out their financial
                    statement, to show if they're financially capable of paying the
                    bill. If the individual doesn't have any assets, we're not going to
                    be able to collect on that," he said.
                    After receiving a bill, a person has 30 days to respond, which
                    includes options to appeal or negotiate, he said.
                    Last week, the Forest Service announced it would bill a Friday
                    Harbor man about $80,000 for starting the Rex II Fire, which burned
                    16 acres on the north shore of Lake Chelan in late September.
                    ---
                    Information from: The Wenatchee World, http://www.wenworld.com

                    (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Ellensburg man gets 10 years for arson fires

                      ELLENSBURG, Wash. (AP) - A road worker who set a string of
                      wildfires in central Washington's Kittitas County last year has
                      been sentenced to nearly 10 years in prison.
                      Wade K. Kirkwood, 37, of Ellensburg, pleaded guilty to 11
                      arson-related charges two weeks ago for setting fires that scorched
                      14,000 acres and caused damages estimated at more than $1 million.
                      Superior Court Judge Michael Cooper on Tuesday sentenced
                      Kirkwood to 116 months in prison - nearly 10 years - and placed him
                      on probation after his release for as long as three years. Cooper
                      also ordered Kirkwood to pay restitution, which has not yet been
                      calculated but which the judge warned could run in the hundreds of
                      thousands of dollars.
                      The prison term was the maximum sentence allowed under the law.
                      Frustrated by the sentencing guidelines, Cooper told Kirkwood,
                      "You should consider yourself lucky."
                      Kirkwood apologized to the community and his family in a
                      prepared statement he read to the court.
                      "If I had the ability to turn back time, I would," he said.
                      Kirkwood was arrested after his vehicle was spotted from the air
                      leaving the scene of two fires in mid-August. By then, a task force
                      representing more than a dozen agencies was on full alert.
                      In a statement to the court, Kittitas County Sheriff Gene Dana
                      said the cost of fighting the fires and trying to catch the
                      arsonist paled in comparison to the emotional toll the fires took
                      on residents.
                      "Like a serial killer or a child molester on the loose, people
                      in our community were really, truly afraid last summer," he said.
                      "Basically lives were put on hold."
                      Amber Schlichting, a young mother of two whose mobile home
                      burned last summer in the Elk Heights Fire, said Kirkwood's apology
                      meant nothing to her.
                      "It wasn't an explanation," she said, her eyes welling with
                      tears. "I doubt there is one."
                      Kirkwood's wife, Tracy, said she still doesn't know what drove
                      her husband to start fires.
                      "I think he realizes what he has done, that it wasn't worth
                      it," she said.

                      (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                      • #41
                        Nothing left to burn....

                        CHELAN, Wash. (AP) - Lake Chelan Valley could escape the fire
                        season this year because so much forest land around the lake has
                        burned over the past 10 years that there isn't enough fuel left for
                        another catastrophic wildfire season.
                        "I don't think we'll be set up for another 30,000-acre or
                        larger fire for the next 15 to 20 years," said Marsh Haskins, fire
                        manager for the Lake Chelan Ranger District.
                        "The areas around most of the campgrounds have been pretty well
                        cleaned out by fire in recent years," he said. "We may have some
                        short-lived grass fires, but nothing too large."
                        At least 150,000 acres around the lake have burned since 1994,
                        when 135,000 acres was charred by the Tyee Fire.
                        "I sure hope that Marsh is correct," said Dan Hodge, executive
                        director of the Lake Chelan Chamber of Commerce. "The fire season
                        is one of those very unpredictable things for businesses, so there
                        is a lot of concern about it every year.
                        "July and August are such an important part of the year for all
                        of the businesses, and anything that disrupts it has a significant
                        impact."
                        Since '94, the area has been blackened by the North 25 Mile, Rex
                        Creek, Deer Point, Deer Mountain, Union Valley and last summer's
                        Pot Peak and Deep Harbor fires.
                        "Essentially what's happened is all those fires have broken up
                        the landscape so you don't have continuous fuels anymore," said
                        Richy Harrod, a fire ecologist for the Okanogan and Wenatchee
                        National Forests.
                        About 18,000 to 20,000 burnable acres - in patches in valleys
                        north of the city of Chelan, the Slide Ridge area on the south
                        shore, and farther up the lake near Holden and Stehekin - are left.
                        Fire could flare up just about anywhere with dry land and hot
                        weather, Haskins said. But it won't likely go very far.
                        "In the old burn areas like Rex Creek and Deer Point, a fire
                        would be short-lived," he said.
                        But the "low risk" benefits of wildfire don't last long.
                        Within 15 or 20 years, snags and debris will start to build up on
                        the ground and young trees will be growing back in burned areas.
                        Harrod cited the example of Pot Peak.
                        "It burned 30 years ago in the 1970s fires. When all that
                        burned material came down, we ended up with a pretty intense fire
                        in there last summer. It was the same thing with the Deer Point
                        Fire, which also burned in '70."
                        Areas burned by the Deep Harbor Fire last summer, plus parts of
                        the 2001 Rex Creek Fire and the 2002 Deer Point Fire were burned so
                        severely that it could be decades before they can sustain another
                        big fire.
                        In the meantime, the Forest Service will continue to use a
                        combination of logging and prescribed burns to reduce the risk in
                        other areas, Haskins said.
                        Chelan residents and businesses know fire is a natural part of
                        the Central Washington ecology, Hodge said.
                        But the city has had more than its share of fires in recent
                        years.
                        "It would be nice to be able to go out to your car and not have
                        ash all over it," said Michelle Dobson, assistant manager of the
                        Best Western Lakeside Lodge and Suites on the south shore of Lake
                        Chelan. "We have the best view in town and we're praying for blue
                        skies this summer."
                        Late spring rain has delayed the state fire season this year,
                        but it will come.
                        "It's basically delayed what we had expected to be an early
                        start to the fire season," Harrod said. "We're now on a more
                        normal schedule."
                        Fires are expected in July and August, after the rains are gone
                        and high temperatures dry the landscape.
                        An estimated 700,000 acres in the Okanogan and Wenatchee
                        national forests are still overcrowded, ready to go up when the
                        fuel is tinder dry.
                        Land managers are using a combination of prescribed burning and
                        logging to thin the forests, but it will take years to address all
                        the problem areas, Harrod said.
                        "We can make a dent here and a dent there, but we're not able
                        to treat much with the dollars and people we have," said Jim
                        Burdick, assistant fire manager for the two national forests.
                        Years of dry summers, plus last winter's critically low
                        snowfall, mean the forests will endure another year with little
                        water.
                        Rain doesn't heal the forests like snowpack, he said.
                        "We're thankful for this rain," said Burdick. "But we're
                        still in a long-term drought. So when things dry out, like they
                        always do in June, July and August, we still could face a fire
                        season that will give us problems."
                        "Here in Chelan County, we always have a fire season," Haskins
                        said. "But the length of severity of it this summer will be set
                        for us by the amount of moisture we get in the next month."
                        ---
                        Information from: The Wenatchee World, http://www.wenworld.com
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                        • #42
                          Wildfire near Pearrygin Lake blackens about 500 acres
                          fonrmdgb
                          WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters have dug containment lines
                          around about 75 percent of a wildfire that has blackened about 500
                          acres of timberland near Pearrygin Lake, in north-central
                          Washington northeast of Winthrop, authorities said Monday evening.
                          Koshare Lomnicki, a spokeswoman for the interagency government
                          team fighting the fire, said about 130 people battled the fire
                          Monday, including two helicopters from the state Department of
                          Natural Resources and aerial tankers from Canada.
                          She said the helicopters were dipping water from Pearrygin Lake.
                          No injuries were reported, and no structures or campgrounds were
                          threatened. The fire was reported about 12:30 p.m. Sunday.
                          The fire is believed to be human-caused, but the cause has not
                          been determined, Lomnicki said.

                          (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                          • #43
                            July 5th

                            OMAK, Wash. (AP) - A pair of wildfires in north-central
                            Washington continued to burn Tuesday across about 2,500 acres of
                            land near Omak and Winthrop. Another fire, north of the Hanford
                            nuclear reservation in south-central Washington, burned more than
                            1,000 acres.
                            The largest blaze was northeast of Omak, and had burned about
                            2,000 acres on the Colville Indian Reservation, in sage and
                            grassland.
                            The fire was reported about 1:30 p.m. Monday near a residential
                            area, but no structures were being threatened late Tuesday
                            afternoon as wind moved the flames away from the homes, said Dale
                            Warriner, information officer for the interagency group fighting
                            the fire.
                            About 150 people fought the fire Tuesday, and as many as 500
                            were expected to be on the scene Wednesday. No containment estimate
                            was available late Tuesday afternoon, Warriner said.
                            The fire near Winthrop had burned about 500 acres. It started
                            Sunday, and firefighters had it largely contained Tuesday with the
                            help of helicopters and air tankers.
                            No injuries were reported, and the causes of both fires were
                            under investigation.
                            The fire north of Hanford was reported Tuesday afternoon and
                            covered more than 1,000 acres of brush. Blowing smoke prompted the
                            Washington State Patrol to close state Highways 24 and 243.

                            (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                            • #44
                              July 6th

                              OMAK, Wash. (AP) - Cooler temperatures Wednesday helped fire
                              crews battling three wildfires covering more than 7,000 acres near
                              Omak, Winthrop and on the Hanford nuclear reservation.
                              Firefighters were optimistic about containing the blaze that had
                              charred 5,100 acres of grass and sagebrush on the northwest corner
                              of the Hanford nuclear reservation, though the acreage covered had
                              more than doubled since Tuesday, said spokeswoman Jeree Mills at
                              the Northwest Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.
                              About 45 firefighters with fire engines and water tenders were
                              on the scene, at the Saddle Mountain National Wildlife Refuge near
                              Mattawa, Mills said.
                              A 530-acre fire in grass, sagebrush and timber near Winthrop was
                              about 60 percent contained, she said. More than 300 firefighters
                              were working that blaze.
                              And a 2,000-acre fire burning grass and brush near Omak was
                              about 30 percent contained. About 170 firefighters were building
                              fire lines with the help of two helicopters and other equipment.
                              That fire is no longer threatening homes on the Colville Indian
                              reservation.
                              No injuries were reported at any of the fires. The causes were
                              undetermined.
                              Meanwhile, three men were in custody for earlier fires.
                              J.P. Martin King, 30, of Tieton was arraigned Tuesday on a
                              charge of second-degree arson in a series of brush fires covering
                              about 1,200 acres last week in Naches Heights, northwest of Yakima.
                              King, charged with using fireworks to set fires, was being held on
                              $250,000 bail.
                              Bail was set Tuesday at $50,000 each for two other men - ages 18
                              and 20, from Hillsboro, Ore. - who were being held for
                              investigation of setting a brush fire that burned about 20 acres
                              Saturday along U.S. 97 just south of the Toppenish National
                              Wildlife Refuge. A third person was being sought, according to a
                              police affidavit.
                              ---
                              On the 'Net:
                              Northwest Coordination Center in Portland, Ore., www.nwccweb.us

                              (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                              • #45
                                July 25th

                                ROOSEVELT, Wash. (AP) - One wildfire in south-central Washington
                                remains at about 46-hundred acres and is 50 percent contained this
                                evening, but a new fire has been reported burning on about
                                three-thousand acres.
                                The larger fire is mostly burning grass and scattered brush on
                                private land south of Bickleton, about three miles north of the
                                Columbia River.
                                More than 200 firefighters worked on building lines around the
                                fire.
                                The fire started Saturday, apparently by a wheat harvesting
                                combine.
                                The new fire was reported this afternoon in Benton County.
                                Initially reported at about 200 acres at 2 p-m, it had covered
                                three-thousand acres by 6 p-m.
                                Its cause is not yet known, but no structures are threatened and
                                no injuries have been reported.
                                The National Weather Service has issued a fire-weather watch for
                                Wednesday and Thursday in the Eastern Washington counties of
                                Benton, Columbia, Franklin, Grant, Klickitat and Walla Walla.

                                (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

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