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  • #16
    Oh Canada......

    SPOKANE (AP) - The 70,296-acre Farewell Creek fire in
    northcentral Washington burned through two wilderness passes
    Tuesday, dashing firefighters' best hopes of containing it before
    it reaches the Canadian border.
    On Tuesday afternoon "we lost the best opportunity to stop the
    forward movement at Ashnola (Pass)," said John Szulc, Farewell
    Creek zone one division supervisor.
    Barring significant weather change, he said, "options are
    limited for containment prior to reaching the Canadian border. We
    saw some amazing fire behavior."
    The lightning-caused fire also burned through Andrews Pass, said
    Kent Romney, a fire spokesman.
    The main objectives have been to keep the fire, now burning in
    the Pasayten Wilderness, from advancing into Canada, about five
    miles to the north, or into the Loomis State Forest, about five
    miles to the east. Firefighters had hoped to pinch off its northern
    advance at the two passes.
    No injuries were reported Tuesday in any of Washington's
    wildfires, burning over more than 80,000 acres.
    The Farewell Creek fire sent as many as 12 giant smoke plumes as
    high as 25,000 feet, Romney said. The smoke was visible on the west
    side of the Cascade Mountains and on Seattle and Spokane weather
    radar.
    A 20-person crew of Canadian hotshot firefighters arrived
    Tuesday night, and will be deployed Wednesday somewhere on the
    northwest flank, Romney said.
    The fire was about 35 percent contained, mostly in areas outside
    the 530,000-acre roadless wilderness.
    A giant portable pool of fire retardant is now operational in
    Canada, just 1.5 miles north of the border, so helicopters won't
    have to fly so far to fill up, Romney said.
    Another Eastern Washington wildfire has swept across more than
    12,000 acres in rural Lincoln County.
    Statewide fire service resources were mobilized Tuesday
    afternoon to support local crews working to contain the fire about
    13 miles south of Creston, west of Spokane.
    Washington State Patrol Chief Ronal Serpas authorized the use of
    state resources because of threats to crops and outbuildings as
    well as the extreme fire conditions.
    The fire burned within 20 feet of a couple of ranch houses but
    none was lost, spokesman Scott Boyd of the federal Bureau of Land
    Management said Tuesday night.
    About 170 firefighters were expected on that blaze on Wednesday.
    The fire is believed to have been started Sunday by the
    catalytic converter on a vehicle's exhaust system, Department of
    Natural Resources spokeswoman Kathy Helm said.
    The fire was burning on grassy range land owned by the BLM,
    Washington state and private residents, she said.

    In Asotin County in southeastern Washington, farmers and
    ranchers battled a range fire that grew to at least 1,344 acres
    before being contained Tuesday.
    A lightning strike sparked the blaze Saturday afternoon near
    Ayers Gulch, about seven miles from Asotin on property owned by the
    state Department of Fish and Wildlife.
    The fire burned mostly grass in the Asotin Creek Wildlife Area,
    though some homes were briefly threatened.
    Firefighters on Tuesday contained the 2,245-acre McGinnis Flats
    fire near Keller on the Colville Indian Reservation. A helicopter
    pilot died in a crash while dropping water on the fire on Friday.
    It was the first fatality of the state's wildfire season this year.
    Investigators have said the fire, which started July 18, was
    human-caused. More than 600 firefighters worked the blaze and some
    were being released to other assignments Tuesday. It has cost more
    than $4.8 million to fight so far.
    In Western Washington on Tuesday, a smoky fire burned over more
    than 20 acres of an 18-square-mile woodland training area at Fort
    Lewis, the sprawling Army base south of Tacoma. That blaze was
    fought by base personnel, Army spokesman Lt. Col. Stephen Barger
    said.
    There was no threat to people or structures. The cause was under
    investigation.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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    • #17
      7/30

      By NICHOLAS K. GERANIOS
      Associated Press Writer
      SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters in Washington paused to
      remember a fallen comrade on Wednesday, then battled scorching heat
      and conditions so dry that any spark could instantly start a new
      wildfire.
      A memorial service was conducted at a fire camp for helicopter
      pilot Randall Harmon, of Grants Pass, Ore., who died in a crash
      last Friday while dropping water on the McGinnis Flats fire on the
      Colville Indian Reservation.
      He is the only Washington fatality in this summer's wildfire
      season; the crash remained under investigation.
      Triple-digit temperatures were the rule in much of Eastern
      Washington on Wednesday, leaving firefighters to battle heat
      exhaustion as well as flames.
      The National Weather Service on Wednesday afternoon issued a
      hazardous weather outlook to firefighters in Eastern Washington and
      northern Idaho. Unseasonably hot temperatures and very low humidity
      had produced a "red flag warning" in the region, the Weather
      Service said.
      "If a spark hits the ground, the probability is 80 to 100
      percent ignition," said information officer Deanna Raskovich, with
      the U.S. Forest Service at the giant Farewell Creek fire. "The
      live trees are drier than kiln-dried lumber now."
      Conditions are especially dangerous on the eastern slopes of the
      Cascade Range, and in the Okanogan Valley, the Weather Service
      said.
      The Farewell Creek fire in the Pasayten Wilderness of
      northcentral Washington grew about 2,000 acres on Wednesday to
      71,570 acres, and was being fought by more than 1,000 firefighters.
      "I don't know how it can get any warmer," Raskovich said.
      Temperatures reached 105 in her tent on Tuesday and 114 degrees
      inside the portable restrooms in the fire camp, Raskovich said.
      While this has been a below-average fire season so far
      nationally, that's not the case in Washington, said Jackie Denk, an
      information officer with the National Interagency Fire Center in
      Boise, Idaho.
      There have been 19 large fires so far in the state - described
      as those burning more than 100 acres in timber or 300 acres in
      grass. They have burned a total of 108,340 acres.
      For all of last year in Washington, there were 11 large fires,
      and they burned 74,013 acres, she said.
      The reason is unusually hot, dry weather this year, Denk said.
      "We are very concerned about the next few days because of high
      to extreme fire indexes we see in that area," Denk said. "The
      time is ripe for large fires to get started."
      Firefighters at the Farewell Creek fire on Wednesday were trying
      to strengthen the west flank of the fire. They can use only hand
      tools - not motorized vehicles - in a wilderness area, although
      aircraft are allowed to drop water, she said.
      Firefighters pulled out of the northern front of the fire,
      because weather conditions are too dangerous, she said.
      The 28 fire crews include a Canadian crew and two crews of elite
      Hotshots from the Southwest, she said.
      Efforts to prevent the fire from burning into Canada have likely
      failed, after the fire on Tuesday moved through two mountain passes
      in the wilderness, officials said.
      Across the border, the backcountry areas of Cathedral Provincial
      Park in British Columbia were closed to recreational use Wednesday
      because of the fire risk.
      The B.C. Ministry of Water, Land and Air Protection said
      backcountry closures in the park would stay in effect until
      conditions improved. So-called "core areas" remained open,
      including Cathedral Lake lodge.
      The Farewell Creek fire was caused by lightning. It is about 35
      percent contained, mostly in areas outside the 530,000-acre
      roadless wilderness.
      Meanwhile, a 12,000-acre wildfire in rural Lincoln County was
      contained on Tuesday. No structures were lost and there were no
      injuries, officials said.
      For the second day in a row, a wildfire was burning on Fort
      Lewis, the sprawling Army base south of Tacoma in Western
      Washington.
      The new fire was reported Wednesday afternoon in Training Area
      Four, an area about a mile from Interstate 5. The size and cause of
      the fire were not immediately determined but Fort Lewis spokeswoman
      Brendalyn Carpenter said the Army was using its own personnel to
      fight it. No structures were threatened.
      Army personnel also were monitoring a fire that broke out
      Tuesday on another part of the base and was contained at roughly 30
      acres.
      Numerous other small fires have broken out all over Eastern
      Washington, and have mostly been quickly contained by local
      firefighters.
      ---
      On the Net:
      Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center:
      www.or.blm.gov/nwcc/
      Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest: www.fs.fed.us/r6/oka
      Farewell Creek fire: www.fawnpeak.com

      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment


      • #18
        Frewell

        WINTHROP, Wash. (AP) - Washington's largest fire burning near
        the Canadian border did not grow, as clouds and higher humidity
        helped firefighters gain an upper hand on the flames.
        The Farewell Creek fire, holding steady at 75,555 acres, was 57
        percent contained Sunday, said fire information officer Howard
        Hunter.
        "It has slowed down and it's just creeping at this point," he
        said.
        Some crews were being sent home as clouds and higher humidity
        forced the fire to slow down.
        Ten to 12 fire crews have been stationed inside the containment
        zone so they can be closer to the fire while they fight it, Hunter
        said. Meals were being flown into them daily.
        The Farewell Creek fire was started by lightning on June 29 and
        is about four miles from the Canadian border. It has cost nearly
        $29 million to fight.

        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #19
          8/6

          OKANOGAN, Wash. (AP) - Investigators have arrested a man they
          allege is responsible for a fire that burned five homes in Okanogan
          last month.
          Michael D. Dick of Okanogan and Seattle was being held Wednesday
          in the Okanogan County Jail for investigation of first-degree
          arson.
          Bail was set at $100,000, a spokeswoman for the Okanogan County
          prosecutor said.
          Dick, 34, was arrested Tuesday evening in Seattle.
          Sheriff Frank Rogers said the 350-acre fire that caused $2.5
          million in damage to homes and orchards was started with a can of
          lighter fluid near Dick's home.
          Detectives spent two weeks investigating the fire scene and
          interviewing residents before they went to Seattle to search Dick's
          residence there and arrest him.
          Rogers said witnesses saw Dick across the street from a trailer
          where he was staying with relatives when the fire started.
          The lighter fluid can was found in the same place as the
          original point of ignition for the fire, Rogers said.
          If Dick is found guilty, he could be held liable for all of the
          monetary damages resulting from the fire.
          Early Wednesday, thunderstorms moved through Eastern Washington,
          unleashing more than 650 lightning strikes. The lightning started
          40 wildfires in the Okanogan and Wenatchee national forests, but
          most were small and quickly contained.
          The largest was the Butte fire, which burned 300 acres of grass
          and brush near the resort town of Chelan, Forest Service
          spokeswoman Robin DeMario said Wednesday.
          The fire posed no immediate threat to homes, she said.
          Many of the fires were in remote areas, and it was too early to
          estimate the total acreage burned, DeMario said.
          The storms bypassed the 77,039-acre Farewell Creek fire in the
          Pasayten Wilderness, the state's largest blaze. That fire is now 60
          percent contained, spokesman Mike Ferris said.
          The fire was started by lightning June 29 and is about four
          miles from the Canadian border. No major injuries or damage to
          structures have been reported.
          A fire was burning Wednesday night across approximately 1,000
          acres in the Juniper Dunes Wilderness Area in Franklin County, 15
          miles northeast of the Tri-Cities, said Scott Boyd, a fire
          management officer with the Bureau of Land Management.
          That blaze was believed sparked by lightning. No homes were
          threatened.

          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment


          • #20
            August 10th

            Pricetag for Farewell Creek blaze exceeds $35 million
            fonspoelljcpa1
            By The Associated Press
            The price tag for the state's largest wildfire, the 7-week-old
            Farewell Creek blaze in the federal Pasayten Wilderness in
            northcentral Washington, has reached $35 million and it's climbing.
            "Yes, it's pretty expensive," spokesman David Widmark of the
            Northwest Interagency Fire Coordination Center in Portland, Ore.,
            said Sunday. "It's very expensive."
            Operations officials for different agencies pegged the exact
            figure for fighting the lightning-caused fire at $35,334,490 on
            Sunday.
            Meanwhile, the blaze that began June 29 increased to 81,000
            acres Sunday from 79,950 acres Saturday.
            "It's creeping and crawling along," Widmark said.
            There were 954 firefighters battling the fire, down from 1,053
            on Saturday. Containment remained at about 65 percent. Crews were
            aided by 13 helicopters dropping water and retardants.
            "We have had some fire crew rotations," Widmark said. "We
            take firefighters off after 14 days."
            The fire is burning primarily in lodgepole pine and subalpine
            fir at the 6,000-foot elevation of the Cascade Mountains.
            The 5,200-acre Juniper Dunes Wilderness fire, ignited by a
            lightning strike Wednesday 14 miles northeast of Pasco, was 95
            percent contained Sunday.
            "It will be contained tonight," Widmark said. "We will have a
            fire line completely around it."
            A crew of 103 people were fighting the lightning-caused fire on
            Bureau of Land Management land in wheat fields, sagebrush and
            grass, but Widmark said firefighters were doing mop-up work and
            would begin to come off the lines later in the day. No more
            helicopter water drops were scheduled there Sunday.
            Despite additional rainfall early Sunday, about 25 small fires,
            including the 50-acre Gold Hill fire about two miles southeast of
            Darrington, were still burning in heavily timbered areas of the
            Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in Skagit and Snohomish
            counties.
            Those blazes - dubbed the North Zone Complex Fire - were set off
            by lightning storms late Tuesday and early Wednesday. There were
            210 firefighters fighting them Sunday, Widmark said.
            In Spokane on Sunday, the city Fire Department mopped up a
            wind-driven fire on the bluff bordering the South Hill.
            The fire began Saturday afternoon - its cause was unknonwn - on
            a steep hillside below High Drive. Light winds from the southwest
            and west fanned the flames up the dry slope and toward the street.
            For a time, the fire poured smoke into a residential
            neighborhood, briefly blowing up a wall of flame that sent
            firefighters and spectators running.
            Neighborhood resident Eric Penar watched the fire crest the
            hill.
            "The sky turned almost black, then a firefighter came
            scrambling up on all fours, another firefighter pulled him over the
            barricade and then there was just this wall of flame," Penar told
            The Spokesman-Review of Spokane. He estimated the flames at 7 to 9
            feet tall.
            Meanwhile, a string of suspicious wildfires plagued Kittitas and
            Yakima counties, prompting authorities to form a
            multijurisdictional task force in hopes of finding a suspect,
            Debbie Robinson, fire prevention coordinator for the Department of
            Natural Resources and task force spokeswoman, told the Daily Record
            of Ellensburg.
            "We want to stop any new (fire) starts and heighten public
            awareness," Robinson said. "We need the public's help. We can't
            be everywhere at once."
            Because of the high number of fires, locations and start times,
            many have been labeled suspicious - possible arsons.
            "All of these fires, both in Kittitas and Yakima counties, have
            been in open areas with grassy hills so they spread quickly,"
            Robinson said.
            "All of them are suspicious on how they started. If it is a
            natural start, there are tell-tale signs. A fair amount of these
            fires have started close to the road. That is not a usual place for
            a fire to start."
            There have been 25 rural fires in Kittitas County since the end
            of May, Kittitas County Fire Marshal Derald Gaidos said. Since May
            23, more than 1,600 acres have burned.
            Four of the fires were confirmed as started by fireworks. One
            was started by a vehicle backfiring. The cause of the others was
            unknown.
            "We need the public to get descriptions of the vehicles driving
            by or staying in the area of a fire," Robinson said. "Notice if
            someone is taking pictures. Pay attention to the weather. The color
            of the smoke will tell us if it was a natural start or if an
            accelerant was used."

            (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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            • #21
              8/18

              CURLEW, Wash. (AP) - On the ground and from the air, about 200
              firefighters and support staff worked to slow the advance of the
              Togo Mountain fire in the Colville National Forest.
              Better mapping revealed Sunday that the fire was 3,000 acres and
              growing - about 1,000 acres larger than fire officials had believed
              the day before, said Elaine Paladino, a national forest
              spokeswoman.
              Three helicopters and three air tankers were dropping water on
              the fire, which was sparked by lightning and was first reported
              Friday. It was burning in heavy timber on steep terrain about 15
              miles northeast of Curlew, about one-half mile from the Canadian
              border.
              Five water tenders, five bulldozers and six engines were being
              used on the ground.
              "No homes or structures are threatened at this point, but
              there's no estimated time of containment, either," Paladino said.
              Canadian crews were keeping an eye on the blaze on the other
              side of the border in British Columbia, and were letting fire crews
              take water from Christina Lake near Grand Forks, Paladino said.
              Meanwhile, crews fighting the state's other major wildfires
              reported progress.
              In Stevens County near Northport, the Black Canyon fire remained
              about 70 percent contained at nearly 2,280 acres, said Heather
              Cole, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
              On Saturday, fire bosses said they were concerned that dry
              lightning in the forecast could complicate firefighting efforts.
              "Actually, we were very fortunate. We didn't get any dry
              lightning, and the winds weren't up to what we had originally
              expected," Cole said. "It basically blew over us."
              Nearly 1,000 firefighters and support personnel were working the
              fire, which was burning in rocky slopes.
              In Snohomish County, east of Darrington, the largest in a
              complex of about two dozen fires reached 90 percent containment on
              Sunday, fire spokeswoman Cindy White said.
              The 170-acre Gold Hill fire had not grown in days, and most of
              the other fires are no bigger than an acre.

              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

              Comment


              • #22
                8/18

                CURLEW, Wash. (AP) - More than 500 firefighters worked Monday to
                slow the advance of the Togo Mountain fire, burning in the Colville
                National Forest near the Canadian border.
                Fire managers in both the United States and Canada coordinated
                efforts to fight the blaze, which had grown to about 4,100 acres
                Monday, spokesman Nick Mickel said.
                No structures were immediately threatened, but residents of 61
                homes and farms just north of the border in Canada have been put on
                evacuation alert, spokeswoman Diana Baxter said Monday night.
                The town of Grand Forks, British Columbia, is about five miles
                north of the fire.
                "We accomplished quite a bit of work in the area today,"
                Baxter said, adding water tenders and bulldozers were assisting
                firefighters in the ground attack.
                Several helicopters also dropped water, she said.
                The fire was just 5 percent contained on Monday, Baxter said.
                The lightning-sparked blaze was first reported Friday. It was
                burning in heavy timber on steep terrain about 15 miles northeast
                of Curlew, about one-half mile from the Canadian border.
                Canadian crews were keeping an eye on the blaze on the other
                side of the border and were letting U.S. fire crews take water from
                Christina Lake near Grand Forks, national forest spokeswoman Elaine
                Paladino said.
                Meanwhile, crews fighting the state's other major wildfires
                reported progress.
                In Stevens County near Northport, the Black Canyon fire was
                about 80 percent contained at nearly 2,280 acres, said Heather
                Cole, a spokeswoman for the state Department of Natural Resources.
                Nearly 1,000 firefighters and support personnel were working the
                fire, which was burning in rocky slopes.
                In Snohomish County, east of Darrington, the 170-acre Gold Hill
                fire was contained early Monday, fire spokeswoman Cindy White said.

                (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                • #23
                  August 19th

                  CURLEW, Wash. (AP) - A wildfire edged closer to the Canadian
                  border on Tuesday, but a joint U.S.-Canadian firefighting effort
                  slowed its advance.
                  Fire managers in the United States and Canada were both working
                  on the Togo Mountain Fire, which grew by 200 acres to 4,300 acres
                  on Tuesday, said fire spokeswoman Diana Baxter of the Colville
                  National Forest.
                  The growth occurred as embers rolled to the bottom of small
                  ravines and ignited fuels on the northern fire boundary.
                  The fire is about half a mile south of the Canadian border, and
                  five miles south of the town of Grand Forks, British Columbia.
                  No structures were immediately threatened, but residents of 61
                  homes north of the border in Canada remained on evacuation alert,
                  Baxter said.
                  A bulldozer from Canada built a firebreak from the Canadian
                  border to Independence Creek on the U.S. side, Baxter said.
                  Winds were making conditions difficult for firefighters, but
                  there were no injuries, she said.
                  The lightning-sparked blaze was first reported Friday. It was
                  burning in heavy timber on steep terrain about 15 miles northeast
                  of Curlew.
                  In Stevens County near Northport, the Black Canyon fire was
                  about 85 percent contained at nearly 2,280 acres. Firefighters are
                  protecting 183 homes. Nearly 1,000 firefighters and support
                  personnel were working the fire, which was burning on rocky slopes.

                  (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    August 21st

                    CARNATION, Wash. (AP) - Several spot wildfires burned across
                    brush, grass and trees near this Snoqualmie Valley town Thursday,
                    destroying one barn and moving down a hillside toward a cluster of
                    homes.
                    Flames at the north end of Tolt River Road were across the road
                    from the 100-home Swiftwater development, said Josie Williams, a
                    spokeswoman for Eastside Fire and Rescue.
                    The fire area was estimated at 40 to 50 acres by King County
                    officials. Williams said about 200 homes were threatened in all.
                    "The fire is slowing down a bit," she said Thursday evening,
                    about two hours after the flames were first reported.
                    There were no reports of injuries and no indication any animals
                    had been in the barn that burned.
                    No evacuations were ordered, Williams said, but nearby residents
                    were alerted and ready to go. Some residents voluntarily left their
                    homes.
                    Other homeowners grabbed garden hoses and put out spot fires in
                    grass near their backyards.
                    Mayor Stuart Lisk said Thursday evening that fire officials told
                    him the main wildfire was 50 percent contained. Several spot fires
                    were extinguished earlier.
                    There was no immediate word on the cause of the fires near this
                    community about 25 miles east of Seattle.
                    The rural area near the Tolt River in eastern King County
                    includes houses, forested areas and fields with livestock.
                    Firefighters from Carnation and other departments took a
                    defensive position, laying hoses from hydrants along Tolt River
                    Road and filling up water tankers, Williams said.
                    A helicopter scooped water from nearby Lake Langlois and dumped
                    it on the flames.
                    Michelle DeBacker of Carnation said her neighbors left the
                    River's Edge neighborhood one mile from State Route 203 in east
                    Carnation. She said the fire was burning on land logged several
                    years ago.
                    "We're leaving right now," Kaisa Soptich told The Associated
                    Press by telephone, just before leaving her home in the Swiftwater
                    development. She said the fire was "burning real close."
                    Another nearby resident, Karen Barnes, told KOMO-TV she and her
                    neighbors had put valuables in their cars but were taking a "wait
                    and see" approach to whether they should leave their homes.

                    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      August 24th

                      CURLEW, Wash. (AP) - Cooler, damper weather Sunday helped crews
                      make progress on the Togo fire burning in northeastern Washington
                      about a half mile from the Canadian border.
                      The blaze was about 50 percent contained at 5,137 acres, fire
                      spokesman Nick Mickel said.
                      More than 900 firefighters and support personnel were working on
                      burnouts - setting fire to the vegetation between the blackened
                      areas and the containment lines encircling the fire to make sure it
                      doesn't grow.
                      "We hope to accomplish the burnout on the east flank of the
                      fire," said Stan Hinatsu, a fire information officer. "This is
                      the last critical day for us."
                      No structures were threatened, and there were no reports of any
                      injuries.
                      Shifting winds sent haze toward Republic Sunday morning. By
                      afternoon, columns of smoke were visible from Grand Forks, British
                      Columbia, with parts of the town remaining on standby for
                      evacuation.
                      West of the Cascades, crews continued to work on three small
                      fires in Mount Rainier National Park. The fires, ignited by
                      lightning on Aug. 5, had burned about 35 acres and were roughly 25
                      percent contained.
                      State Route 123 remained closed between Stevens Canyon Entrance
                      and Cayuse Pass. Shriner Peak and Deer Creek trailheads also were
                      closed because of the fires.

                      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        April 29, 2004

                        ELLENSBURG, Wash. (AP) - A small forest fire nine miles north of
                        Ellensburg has fire officials worried because it burned so quickly
                        so early in the season.
                        The fire had burned an estimated 60 acres by Thursday, and was
                        about 30 percent contained by fire lines, said Nick Mickel, fire
                        information officer for the state Department of Natural Resources.
                        About 130 people were fighting the fire Thursday, and crews
                        expected to have it totally contained by Friday night, Mickel said.
                        The fire started Tuesday morning, though the cause remained
                        unknown. A windstorm that blew through the region that day with
                        gusts of up to 50 mph whipped the fire into a frenzy. Fire crews
                        rushed to the area and stopped the fire within a half-mile of a
                        dozen structures, mostly summer homes.
                        A half-inch dusting of snow overnight and relatively calm
                        weather Wednesday helped crews hold the fire at about 50 acres.
                        The size of the fire isn't what worries officials. The problem
                        is the timing: It's only April.
                        "It's not entirely unusual," Mickel said. "But it's
                        definitely earlier than people are accustomed to."
                        Most disturbing is that the fire burned so aggressively at a
                        time when the downed timber fueling the fire isn't normally dry
                        enough to burn so readily.
                        "We had a great snowpack this winter, but it's been warm and
                        it's melting fast," he said. "The fuel in the area where it's
                        burning is so dry, it crackles when you walk on it."
                        The key is what happens over the next month or two, he said. A
                        little rain here and there can be a big help. "We're preparing for
                        an above-average fire season," he said. "It all depends on what
                        kind of moisture we get and when we get it."
                        ---
                        Information from: Yakima Herald-Republic,
                        http://www.yakima-herald.com
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          July 5th

                          CHELAN, Wash. (AP) - Two fires near Lake Chelan grew more than a
                          thousand acres each in 24 hours, the Northwest Interagency Fire
                          Coordination Center reported Monday.
                          The Beebe Bridge fire, east of the lake and the Columbia River
                          in Douglas County, sped through sage brush and scrub in steep
                          terrain to cover about 2,000 acres by midday.
                          The Pot Peak fire, 15 miles west of the lake in the Twenty-Five
                          Mile Creek Drainage, had covered 3,470 acres with containment at
                          zero percent, said center spokesman Marc Hollen. More than 830
                          firefighters were on the 10-day-old fire, with 12 helicopters, 24
                          engines and other heavy equipment in steep terrain.
                          There were no reports of structure damage or serious injuries in
                          either blaze.
                          The Beebe Bridge fire, which started Saturday when an owl
                          carrying a chick hit a power line, was 30 percent contained, said
                          spokesman Ray Steiger with a Department of Natural Resources'
                          incident-management team that set up headquarters Monday at Chelan
                          Falls State Park.
                          Firefighters were trying to knock it down before high winds
                          forecast later in the week, he said.
                          "If we do well and hit it right, and the weather doesn't change
                          on us too rapidly, we should be all right," Steiger said.
                          Strong winds were expected to hit the area Wednesday, said Marc
                          Hollen of the interagency center. A lack of rain has brought fire
                          season early this year, and grass and forestland across the state
                          are tinder-dry.
                          The 116 firefighters on site were backed up by five helicopters,
                          35 engines and other gear, said David Widmark at the interagency
                          center. More personnel were being brought in, he said.
                          The choppers were taking water from the Columbia and Lake Chelan
                          to put out hot spots, Steiger said. Crews were trying to keep the
                          fire out of nearby wheat fields and other crops.
                          Irrigated land actually could help slow the flames, Widmark
                          said.
                          On Sunday, the Beebe Bridge fire was considered a threat to the
                          Chelan Hills Development near the city of Chelan in northcentral
                          Washington.
                          But crews were able to burn fuel in its path and direct flames
                          away from the houses, said Scott Logan of Douglas County Fire
                          District 4, who oversaw the firefighting effort until the state
                          team took over Monday.
                          One of the issues for firefighters was rattlesnakes, Steiger
                          noted. "Country that hasn't burned over - there's going to be
                          rattlesnakes in there."
                          Working the Hopkins Canyon fire in northeast Washington remained
                          a full-time job Monday, even though it was contained late Sunday at
                          8 square miles. "We still don't have it under control," Widmark
                          said.
                          The Freezeout fire in near the U.S.-Canadian border in the
                          Pasayten Wilderness remained at 150 acres and 17 percent
                          containment.
                          All but the Beebe Bridge fire were caused by lightning.

                          (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                          • #28
                            July 7th

                            CHELAN, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters made significant progress on
                            one of two fires burning near Lake Chelan on Wednesday, as Gov.
                            Gary Locke warned residents to be extra cautious and avoid any
                            careless acts that could ignite another blaze.
                            The Beebe Bridge fire, about 3 miles east of Lake Chelan and the
                            Columbia River in north-central Washington, was estimated at about
                            70 percent containment Wednesday afternoon, according to a news
                            release.
                            The fire has burned 4,205 acres in steep and rocky grasslands
                            and threatens 25 homes and 10 outbuildings. About 350 firefighters
                            have been assigned to the fire.
                            "The wind didn't give us any problems. There weren't any
                            flare-ups, and the crews had a chance to get around the fire,"
                            said Nick Mickel, fire information officer. "We made great
                            progress."
                            A voluntary evacuation remained in effect for about 45 homes,
                            though it remained unclear how many people had actually left the
                            area, fire spokesman Ray Steiger said.
                            No residences have burned, but five outbuildings were destroyed.
                            Jack Pickett and his family fled their home Monday night and
                            were surprised to return a day later and find the house still
                            standing. A barn, two storage sheds and a car smoldered nearby.
                            "We gave a great big 'Praise the Lord!' when we got back,"
                            Pickett told The Wenatchee World for a story Wednesday.
                            Mickel said fire officials planned to release some crews and
                            equipment from the fire on Thursday because of the progress.
                            Meanwhile, the Pot Peak fire 15 miles west of the lake in the
                            Twenty-Five Mile Creek drainage, was 35 percent contained at 7,200
                            acres on Wednesday, said Tom Knappenberger, a U.S. Forest Service
                            spokesman.
                            "We had some gusting winds last night that caused some fire
                            activity - tested some of the lines on the northeast side,"
                            Knappenberger said.
                            No homes were directly threatened by that blaze although there
                            were 16 homes downstream from the head of the fire, he said.
                            About 930 people were assigned to the Pot Peak fire, including
                            some elite "hot shot" crews.
                            There were no reports of serious injuries in either blaze.
                            Grass and forest land across Washington are already tinder-dry.
                            In a news conference Wednesday, Locke urged residents to use
                            caution.
                            "The good news is we are making excellent progress on both of
                            these wildfires, but the threat of fire is still very significant,
                            and because of the very arid conditions, very dry conditions, we
                            ask everyone to be as careful as possible to avoid any careless act
                            that could ignite a wildfire in our state - east and west of the
                            mountains," Locke said.
                            The Freezeout fire near the U.S.-Canadian border in the Pasayten
                            Wilderness remained at 150 acres and 17 percent containment. Fire
                            officials from both countries planned to meet to discuss the fire,
                            which poses a potential threat to resorts and timber in the Ross
                            Lake National Recreation Area and north of the border.
                            Lightning caused all the fires except the Beebe Bridge blaze,
                            which started Saturday when an owl struck a power line.

                            (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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                            • #29
                              July 15th

                              New fire in Icicle drainage in north Cascades

                              (Leavenworth-AP) -- A new wildfire that quickly grew from a
                              lightning strike to about one-thousand acres is reported this
                              evening in the Icicle Creek drainage west and north of Leavenworth
                              in the Washington Cascades.
                              Mark Hollen of the Northwest Coordination Center in Portland,
                              Oregon, says the fire was reported between 3 and 4 o'clock this
                              afternoon as dry lightning moved through the area.
                              Firefighting crews are being moved in to fight the blaze. No
                              structures are in the area, which has steep, rocky ridges. The area
                              is about nine miles west of Leavenworth.
                              No injuries are reported, but Chelan County sheriff's officers
                              are contacting people in campgrounds in the Icicle Creek area,
                              advising them of the fire and giving them an opportunity to leave.
                              Officials say the fire started at an elevation of five-thousand
                              to six-thousand feet and is slowly moving downhill, burning through
                              fir and pine trees, brush and grass.

                              (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

                              APTV 07-16-04 0003EDT
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
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                              • #30
                                July 26th

                                ELLENSBURG, Wash. (AP) - Firefighters on Monday drew close to
                                full containment of a wildfire that destroyed two cabins and forced
                                some evacuations between Cle Elum and Ellensburg in central
                                Washington.
                                The Lauderdale fire was staying inside the line Monday, said
                                spokesman Dale Warriner with the Northwest Interagency Coordination
                                Center. The fire Monday night was estimated at 250 acres, and was
                                90 percent contained, Warriner said. It earlier had been estimated
                                at 400 acres before a better figure was obtained through global
                                positioning technology, he said.
                                The fire burned two cabins, including a tin structure found
                                burned on Monday. An evacuation order was issued earlier for about
                                27 residences, Warriner said - largely vacation-type structures,
                                with only about half occupied. Full containment was expected
                                Tuesday, he said.
                                "It's pretty breezy right now but things are going well. It
                                hasn't grown any," Warriner said Monday afternoon. He estimated
                                winds were about 20 mph on the ridgetops with no rain. The forecast
                                for Tuesday calls for continued breezy weather.
                                The fire, which broke out Sunday afternoon, was about 6 miles
                                east of Cle Elum near Lookout Mountain and 15 miles northwest of
                                Ellensburg, south of the Wenatchee National Forest. Its cause was
                                under investigation, but is believed to be human-caused, Warriner
                                said.
                                Elsewhere in Washington, the 200-acre Downey Creek fire,
                                apparently caused by lightning, was burning on the edge of the
                                Glacier Peak Wilderness about 16 miles east of Darrington in the
                                Cascades, said Marc Hollen, an Interagency spokesman in Portland,
                                Ore. No firefighters were assigned to the blaze, since it was not
                                threatening any structures or campgrounds, he said.
                                The Sisi Ridge fire grew to 300 acres at the north end of Lake
                                Chelan, about 8 miles west of Stehekin. Helicopters were used to
                                slow the fire's growth. Fire officials believe the fire was started
                                by lightning last Thursday, Hollen said.
                                About 40 miles to the south, the 14,650-acre Pot Peak fire was
                                75 percent contained Monday. The blaze was started by lightning on
                                June 26 about 15 miles west of Chelan.
                                Firefighters fully contained a lightning-sparked wildfire that
                                burned nearly 780 acres near Leavenworth.

                                (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

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