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  • #16
    Aspen Fire- June 22nd

    SUMMERHAVEN, Arizona (AP) - The wildfire that destroyed more
    than 250 homes in this mountaintop community moved on a course that
    would take it into an area where terrain and lighter vegetation
    will make it easier to fight, fire officials said.
    However, crews didn't know how soon they would be able to attack
    the fire in that area, and the blaze's growth in other forested
    areas was still creating difficulties.
    "This fire's going to be here for a while and it's going to be
    very large," Jeff Whitney, deputy commander of the team battling
    the fire, said Sunday.
    The fire had burned across more than 8,800 acres (3,520
    hectares) in the mountains northeast of Tucson and was only about 5
    percent contained Sunday. Firefighters don't expect to totally
    control it for a few weeks.
    Nance Crosby and Robin Quillian were at the fire command center
    Sunday, trying to find out whether their summer cabin was still
    standing.
    "It never occurred to me to try to get anything out," Crosby
    said. "I never thought it would get this bad."
    The blaze was fueled by pine forest ravaged by years of drought
    and a beetle infestation and driven by wind gusting to 60 mph (97
    kph) as it roared through Summerhaven on Thursday. The flames soon
    spread across the top of 9,157-foot (2,747-meter) Mount Lemmon and
    headed down the north slope.
    Firefighters focused their efforts Sunday on an area around a
    University of Arizona observatory and a group of radio and
    television towers, and a ridge where they hoped to stop the fire
    before it advanced on scattered homes.
    Three towers had already been lost.
    Whitney said the fire had charred a half-circle around the
    observatory. Crews using hand-held torches burned grass and brush
    Sunday to try to close the circle and deprive the fire of the fuel
    it would need to move into the observatory complex.
    Crews also planned backburns to clear vegetation along the
    ridge, where they were making a stand between the flames and homes
    southeast of Summerhaven.
    In town, firefighter Paul Miller was part of a crew that went
    through the burned houses looking for hazardous materials such as
    small propane tanks that hadn't exploded in the fire.
    Trees were dry and would burn quickly if the fire came back.
    "There's still danger," Miller said.
    Whitney said officials evacuated a camp that had been scheduled
    to host 250 people beginning Sunday. The camp was about three miles
    from the fire's northern edge.
    The cause of the fire, which began Tuesday, remained under
    investigation. Investigators were expected to survey the fire's
    starting point on Monday.
    The community of Summerhaven had about 100 year-round residents
    but its population grows during the summer and weekends as Tucson
    residents drive up the mountain to escape the desert heat.
    ---
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

    Comment


    • #17
      June 23rd

      TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - Firefighters moved bulldozers north of
      Mount Lemmon on Monday to try to stop a raging wildfire that
      destroyed more than 250 homes in a vacation community.
      The blaze has charred more than 19,500 acres of pine forest on
      the mountain just north of Tucson and was only 15 percent
      contained, firefighters' spokesman Gerry Engel said.
      Crews planned to use the bulldozers to fight the blaze's
      northward spread by digging a firebreak connecting roads, natural
      features and an area that already was burned over last year.
      Firefighters also wanted to cut a line across the fire's
      southern flank, where crews battled Sunday to protect homes after
      burning embers started fires across earlier lines.
      Officials said they appeared to have saved a University of
      Arizona observatory on top of Mount Lemmon.
      They were still protecting what remained of Summerhaven, a
      mountaintop community where the fire roared through on Thursday,
      destroying more than 250 of its 700 or so homes. But they shifted
      some crews out of Summerhaven on Monday to intensify their efforts
      to keep the blaze from spreading.
      "I think everything that hasn't burned is still at risk," said
      Jeff Whitney, deputy commander of the team fighting the fire.
      Federal Emergency Management Agency teams in Summerhaven were
      expected to begin assessing the damage later in the week, a Forest
      Service spokesman said.
      "The thing that hurts the worst is the loss of the forest,"
      said Patty Kirchner, who didn't know what had happened to her
      family's cabin on Mount Lemmon. "Structures can be rebuilt, but
      the forest takes so long."
      The cause of the fire had not been determined. Investigators
      expect to survey the fire's point of origin Tuesday.
      The flames were fueled by pine trees ravaged by years of drought
      and a beetle infestation. The flames soon spread across the top of
      9,157-foot Mount Lemmon and headed down the north slope.
      The fire's spread prompted officials to evacuate a YMCA camp,
      where 250 children had been scheduled to arrive beginning Sunday.
      The Triangle Y Ranch Camp, about three miles from the fire as of
      late Sunday, was in no imminent danger and is among the structures
      the firebreak was intended to protect.
      Firefighters said lighter vegetation at lower elevations
      eventually will help them get a handle on the blaze, but it could
      take a few weeks to contain it entirely.
      Elsewhere Monday, about 300 firefighters attacked a blaze in
      northern New Mexico's Jemez Mountains, which are dotted with
      communities and laced with hiking and biking trails. The 300-acre
      fire was not yet threatening any homes or other structures in the
      area 60 miles north of Albuquerque, officials said.
      "We're trying to get a handle on this fire and keep it small at
      this point," said Charlie Jankiewicz, a fire information officer
      with the Santa Fe National Forest.
      Firefighters battled another fire that burned about 255 acres of
      private ranch land near Fort Union National Monument, said John
      Harrison, a spokesman for the state Forestry Division. He said the
      fire, which was sparked by lightning, was 10 percent contained late
      Monday
      Firefighters also were battling a number of lightning-sparked
      fires in the Gila National Forest.
      In Alaska, a 36,500-acre fire southeast of Fairbanks continued
      burning south Monday toward cabins on the lower Goodpaster River.
      About 120 firefighters were trying to stop the blaze, which was
      sparked by lightning June 14.
      In a remote area northwest of Fairbanks, another fire grew to
      30,000 acres Monday, but it was being monitored, not fought.
      ---
      On the Net:
      National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
      Mount Lemmon: http://www.mt-lemmon.com/
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment


      • #18
        Origin sought

        TUCSON, Ariz.(AP) - Lightning activity around Mount Lemmon was
        minimal when the Aspen fire began, suggesting that Mother Nature
        may not be responsible for the blaze.
        "It's possible. But based upon the activity, it is very, very,
        very unlikely," Nancy Roth, spokeswoman for Vaisala GAI Inc., told
        the Arizona Daily Star for Tuesday's editions.
        The Finnish-owned company operates the U.S. National Lightning
        Detection Network and tracks lightning strikes for federal
        agencies.
        But an Aspen fire spokesman said federal officials are just
        beginning to investigate. Fire information officer Rick Barton said
        an investigation team has not yet ruled out lightning as its cause.
        The blaze, now estimated to cover almost 20,000 acres, was first
        detected June 17. It is believed to have started on the northern
        slope of Marshall Peak, about a mile southeast of Summerhaven.
        Roth said the company's data recording lightning strikes in the
        region have been forwarded to U.S. Forest Officials to help in the
        investigation, Roth said.
        Roth refused to say whether lightning or humans caused the
        blaze.
        The company, which uses technology initially developed by
        scientists at the University of Arizona, is able to detect 95
        percent of all lightning strikes, Roth said.
        The company's data show only a handful of strikes within a
        15-mile radius of Summerhaven in the days before the fire was
        detected, the newspaper reported.
        The area was lightning-free June 14 and 15 and a single strike
        near San Manuel was recorded June 16.
        Lightning activity increased dramatically June 17, but maps show
        that the strikes were concentrated in the Rincon Mountains, east of
        Tucson.
        The lightning-sparked Helen's 2 Fire began June 17- the same day
        as the Aspen Fire was detected- in the Rincons.

        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #19
          Tucson-AP) -- The latest numbers are in on the blazing Aspen
          fire burning on Mount Lemmon.
          Fire District Chief Dean Barnella says it looks like 330
          structures are destroyed with 133 structures still standing in
          Summerhaven.
          Earlier estimates had 250 homes destroyed. The new numbers are
          based on more accurate assessments.
          Fire officials say the Mount Lemmon blaze has charred nearly
          25-thousand acres of pine forest and other vegetation on the
          mountain.
          It's 25 percent contained. More than 12-hundred firefighters are
          battling the Aspen fire.
          Firefighters spent the day setting fires north of Mount Lemmon
          to strengthen fire lines there.
          Crews used bulldozers to dig a firebreak connecting roads,
          natural barriers and an area that already was burned over last
          year. Those lines are intended to stop the fire at its head.

          ---
          On the Net:
          National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
          Mount Lemmon fire: http://www.fireteam-sw.com/humphrey/aspen/


          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment


          • #20
            Helen II- June 24th

            Acreage in Helen II fire increases


            (Saguaro National Park-AP) -- A fire in steep and rocky terrain
            in the Rincon Mountains has grown to about 15-hundred acres of oak
            and pine.
            Because of high winds reaching 30 miles-an-hour, the fire flared
            up mostly in the northeast area and dropped the containment figure
            from 35 percent to 25 percent.
            A fire information officer says no structures are threatened and
            the blaze was picking up in an area furthest away from developed
            land.
            About 300 firefighters are building lines and conducting burnout
            operations.
            Officials expected the winds to die down today and full
            containment by Thursday evening.
            The Helen II fire is threatening Mexican spotted owl and
            peregrine falcon habitat.
            The fire started June 17th and was lightning-caused.
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

            Comment


            • #21
              FYI

              Officials plan prescribed burn on Grand Canyon Parashant monument

              (Grand Canyon Parashant National Monument-AP) -- Fire management
              officials plan three prescribed burns later this year on monument
              land near the Grand Canyon.
              The planned burns, which will be carried out this summer and
              fall, will include more than two-thousand acres in separate fires.
              Officials from the Lake Mead National Recreation Area say the
              goal of the prescribed burns is to reduce the danger of
              catastrophic fire in the remote Grand Canyon Parashant National
              Monument, north of the Grand Canyon.
              The burns will be scheduled when weather conditions and
              available personnel permit.


              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

              Comment


              • #22
                June 25th

                UCSON, Ariz. (AP) - Firefighters battled a wildfire Wednesday
                without the added concern of furious winds for the first time since
                flames first roared toward a mountaintop vacation hamlet.
                Fire crews expected the turn in weather to help them gain ground
                on the fire, which burned about 345 buildings last week in and
                around Summerhaven, mostly homes and cabins.
                "That will allow firefighters to work closer in to areas and
                without the risk of fire burning over them, or as high a risk,"
                said Carrie Templin, a spokeswoman for the team battling the Aspen
                fire.
                Gusts upward of 40 mph hampered firefighters almost since the
                fire began June 17 on Mount Lemmon, a 9,157-foot peak northeast of
                Tucson. Gusts hitting 60 mph helped drive the flames through
                Summerhaven on Thursday.
                The Mount Lemmon blaze has charred more than 26,700 acres, much
                of it pine forest, but is now 25 percent contained. The cause
                remains under investigation.
                Crews concentrated Wednesday on digging firebreaks on the ends
                of the fire to the north and south of Summerhaven. They also set
                fires to rob the Aspen fire of fuel.
                "I think we're going to hold," said fire commander Larry
                Humphrey.
                Officials didn't expect the fire's acreage to grow significantly
                Wednesday.
                Crews will likely complete the containment line surrounding the
                fire within three or four days, said Buck Wickham, operations chief
                for the fire team.
                Still, officials won't consider the fire fully contained until
                summer rains begin, Wickham said.
                The community of Summerhaven had about 100 year-round residents
                before the fire but its population grew during the summer and
                weekends as Tucson residents drove up the mountain to escape the
                desert heat. The mountain had more than 600 homes.
                Bob Brai, who owns a cabin on Mount Lemmon with his wife, said
                he has mixed emotions, even though the cabin survived.
                "We feel guilty that everybody else has lost theirs and we're
                still there," Brai said.
                ---
                On the Net:
                National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
                Mount Lemmon fire: http://www.fireteam-sw.com/humphrey/aspen/

                (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

                Aspen Fire Resources June 25th, 2003

                RESOURCES: Currently 17 - 20-person Hot Shot Crews and 9 type II crews are assigned to the fire. In addition, eight helicopters, 45 engines and 4 dozers are currently assisting with suppression efforts. Three air tankers are available to support with suppression activities. There are approximately 1,171 people assigned.
                Last edited by NJFFSA16; 06-26-2003, 04:26 AM.
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                Comment


                • #23
                  Roundup June 25th

                  SIERRA VISTA, Ariz. (AP) - Fire crews fully contained the Ash
                  fire Wednesday at 564 acres south of here.
                  Fire information officer Joan Vasey said crews were working on
                  clean-up and rehabilitation along fire lines Wednesday. Other crews
                  were pulled off the fire and sent to more pressing ones, Vasey
                  said. About 160 people were working the fire.
                  She said crews were putting barriers in place to slow erosion.
                  "Since it doesn't look so pretty, they're pulling brush over
                  the lines," she said.
                  The fire had threatened about 25 homes Saturday. Residents were
                  evacuated but allowed to return Sunday after the threat subsided.
                  The Ash fire started accidentally when a maintenance worker used
                  equipment that generated sparks.

                  PICTURE FIRE
                  PUNKIN CENTER, Ariz. - Firefighters working on the 12,655-acre
                  fire north of Roosevelt Lake were expecting a break in the windy
                  weather Wednesday.
                  The fire was 70 percent contained by early Wednesday, and
                  officials hoped to have it fully contained by Thursday evening,
                  said fire information officer Victoria Fox.
                  For days, crews have been struggling with high winds and low
                  humidity, but the winds were expected to be lighter on Wednesday,
                  she said.
                  Crews were focused on bolstering the fire line, Fox said.
                  More than 1,000 people had been called in to work on the blaze,
                  which was first reported on June 17.
                  There were no structures threatened. Recreational and boating
                  sites and roads in the Roosevelt Lake area were open except for
                  Cholla Campground, which was being used by fire crews.
                  The fire 10 miles north of Roosevelt Lake was believed to be
                  human-caused.

                  HELEN 2 FIRE
                  SAGUARO NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. - High winds pushed a fire in the
                  Rincon Mountains beyond the fire line along the east side, growing
                  the blaze to 3,100 acres by early Wednesday.
                  The fire, started by lightning on June 17, was 40 percent
                  contained as it burned through oak and pine along steep and rocky
                  terrain.
                  Fire officials expect to have full containment by Saturday
                  evening.
                  No structures were threatened, though the fire was endangering
                  Mexican spotted owl and peregrine falcon habitat, said Karen
                  Lightfoot, fire information officer.
                  About 580 people were working on the fire.

                  POWELL FIRE
                  GRAND CANYON NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. - A fire on the north rim of
                  the Grand Canyon continued to burn Wednesday.
                  Fire officials said the Powell fire could grow faster with a
                  change in the weather.
                  "We're expecting a little bit of a change in the fire with this
                  high pressure system," said Punky Moore, fire information officer.
                  The fire has burned about 790 acres since it started June 15.
                  Park officials were monitoring the progress of the Powell fire
                  but allowing it to burn to restore the ecosystem.
                  The developed portion of the north rim was open to visitors
                  though two trails were closed.
                  The fire was expected to burn several weeks.


                  (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    June 26th

                    PUNKIN CENTER, Ariz. (AP) - A fire burning north of Roosevelt
                    Lake was expected to be contained by Thursday night, officials
                    said.
                    The 12,665-acre Picture fire was 85 percent contained Thursday,
                    but final containment figures won't be determined until Friday
                    morning. Crews planned to strengthen perimeter lines and patrol the
                    fire, said fire information officer Victoria Fox.
                    Some of the 1,035 people working on the fire were expected to be
                    released to help on other more pressing blazes, she said.
                    The fire 10 miles north of Roosevelt Lake was believed to be
                    human-caused.

                    HELEN 2 FIRE
                    SAGUARO NATIONAL PARK, Ariz. - A fire in the Rincon Mountains
                    burned 3,500 acres by Thursday after high winds pushed the blaze
                    along its east side.
                    Winds died down Wednesday and allowed fire crews to conduct
                    burnout operations on the northwestern flank of the fire. The blaze
                    had been spreading along the eastern side where lines had not been
                    built.
                    Officials expected winds from the north and northeast to blow
                    smoke into the Tucson area Thursday.
                    "The active fire is well away from Tucson, but there's concern
                    for people with respiratory problems so we suggest they be
                    indoors," said Bill Duemling, a fire information officer.
                    Fire crews have to build about two more miles of fire lines
                    before the blaze is fully contained, Duemling said.
                    The fire, started by lightning on June 17, was 45 percent
                    contained as it burned through oak and pine along steep and rocky
                    terrain.
                    Fire officials expected to have full containment by Monday.
                    No structures were threatened, although the fire has burned
                    through Mexican spotted owl and peregrine falcon habitat.
                    About 600 people were working on the fire aided by three
                    helicopters.

                    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      June 26th

                      TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - Firefighters got help from the weather for
                      a second day Thursday as they made progress on containing a
                      wildfire that devastated a mountaintop community.
                      Calmer winds and higher humidity made it easier on crews
                      building and strengthening firebreaks around the blaze, which
                      burned about 345 buildings in and around Summerhaven on Mount
                      Lemmon.
                      "We're making good progress," said Jeff Whitney, deputy fire
                      commander. "Things are looking very good in Summerhaven and up on
                      the mountain."
                      Officials say southern Arizona may experience dry lightning on
                      Friday and Saturday.
                      The Aspen fire began June 17 on the 9,157-foot peak northeast of
                      Tucson. Driven by the wind, flames roared through Summerhaven on
                      the southern side of the mountain on June 19 and continued burning
                      over the top of Mount Lemmon and down the north side.
                      The blaze has charred more than 30,000 acres, much of it pine
                      forest, but is now 35 percent contained. The cause remains under
                      investigation.
                      At its height, more than 1,000 firefighters and support
                      personnel worked to contain the fire and protect the remaining
                      homes in Summerhaven. Some of those firefighters were released
                      Thursday to either take a break or move on to other fires.
                      About 800 people remained on the fire Thursday.
                      The community of Summerhaven had about 100 year-round residents
                      before the fire but its population grew during the summer and
                      weekends as Tucson residents drove up the mountain to escape the
                      desert heat. The mountain had more than 600 homes.
                      No date has been set for when residents can return to their
                      homes on Mount Lemmon.
                      County officials plan to release information late Friday on the
                      status of homes and businesses on Mount Lemmon.
                      "They will only assess whether it is still standing or is
                      destroyed," said Karen Martin, spokeswoman for the Pima County
                      Office of Emergency Management and Homeland Security.
                      Inspectors will determine later whether buildings have been
                      damaged.
                      ---
                      On the Net:
                      National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
                      Mount Lemmon fire: http://www.fireteam-sw.com/humphrey/aspen/

                      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Origin

                        TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - A wildfire that destroyed about 345
                        buildings last week when it roared through a mountaintop vacation
                        hamlet on Mount Lemmon was human-caused, investigators said
                        Thursday.
                        Investigators said they ruled out the possibility that the Aspen
                        fire was caused by lightning and other natural factors.
                        Still, they wouldn't say how they believe the fire that
                        devastated the Summerhaven community was started or whether it was
                        accidental or intentional.
                        "We have people we're interested in talking to," said David
                        Conto, a fire investigator for the Pima County Sheriff's
                        Department. "I wouldn't classify them as suspects yet."
                        The blaze was believed to have started near a trail southwest of
                        Summerhaven.
                        The Aspen fire began June 17 on the 9,157-foot peak northeast of
                        Tucson. Driven by the wind, flames roared through Summerhaven on
                        the southern side of the mountain on June 19 and continued burning
                        over the top of Mount Lemmon and down the north side.
                        Firefighters got help from the weather for a second day Thursday
                        as they made progress on containing the wildfire.
                        The blaze has charred 32,700 acres, much of it pine forest, but
                        is now 50 percent contained.
                        Calmer winds and higher humidity made it easier on crews
                        building and strengthening firebreaks around the blaze.
                        Officials say southern Arizona may experience dry lightning on
                        Friday and Saturday.
                        At its height, more than 1,000 firefighters and support
                        personnel worked to contain the fire and protect the remaining
                        homes in Summerhaven. Some of those firefighters were released
                        Thursday to either take a break or move on to other fires.
                        About 800 people remained on the fire.
                        The community of Summerhaven had about 100 year-round residents
                        before the fire but its population grew during the summer and
                        weekends as Tucson residents drove up the mountain to escape the
                        desert heat. The mountain had more than 600 homes.
                        No date has been set for when residents can return to their
                        homes on Mount Lemmon.
                        ---
                        On the Net:
                        National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
                        Mount Lemmon fire: http://www.fireteam-sw.com/humphrey/aspen/

                        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          PRESCOTT, Ariz. (AP) - A fire that burned close to a community
                          of homes and cabins in the drought-stricken pine forest eight miles
                          south of here was contained Sunday night, fire officials said.
                          The Spruce fire quickly consumed 25 acres of Ponderosa pine and
                          juniper near Walker, but firefighters were able to hold the blaze
                          steady Sunday.
                          "We lucked out," said Walker Fire Chief Jon Sumner. "It broke
                          late in the evening and there was no wind to carry it."
                          By Sunday morning the blaze was ringed entirely with lines that
                          held throughout the day.
                          No homes burned, but the fire backed up to private fences in
                          some areas.
                          About 100 residents were asked to evacuate. Those who left the
                          area were allowed to return home Sunday night.
                          About 60 firefighters worked the blaze. Helicopters also dropped
                          water Sunday morning.
                          "We got a lot of help real quick," Sumner said.
                          Walker is a hodgepodge of 20-acre blocks in a former mining town
                          south of Prescott, a city of 34,000. There are several hundred
                          cabins and houses in the area, most surrounded by thick forest
                          trees.
                          The fire started on private land and burned six to 10 acres
                          before jumping into the forest, said Gary Wittman, a spokesman for
                          the Prescott National Forest Service.
                          The fire was first reported at 60 acres Saturday night but was
                          downsized and contained at 25 acres Sunday evening.
                          "It's under investigation but I'm pretty sure it was human
                          caused because we haven't had any lighting around here," Wittman
                          said.
                          Prescott survived a close call last year when firefighters were
                          able to beat down a fast-moving fire that broke out just outside
                          town. Still, 1,300 acres of forest and six homes burned.
                          Since then, workers have thinned some areas of the forest around
                          Prescott. But bark beetles have exacerbated the fire danger all
                          over the West. In Arizona alone, the insects have killed about 2.5
                          million ponderosa pines and at least 4 million pinyon pines during
                          the past year.
                          ---
                          On the Net:
                          National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/

                          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            July 6th

                            TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - Residents of about 200 homes and guests at
                            a resort hotel were urged to evacuate as flames from a wildfire
                            licked at an exclusive enclave on the city's northern fringe.
                            The voluntary evacuation notice of the homes in Ventana Canyon
                            came Sunday after strong winds pushed the fire downhill faster than
                            expected, fire officials said. Some 300 homes have already been
                            destroyed.
                            The fire, which started June 17 and has burned at least 70,000
                            acres, skirted fire lines last week and burned six cabins between
                            Friday night and early Saturday.
                            The flames came about a half-mile from the nearest homes Sunday.
                            Fire officials expressed confidence that the homes would be safe,
                            at least partly because many are made of stone or brick.
                            The area is a high desert enclave in the foothills of the Santa
                            Catalina Mountains. It includes upscale homes and the 400-room
                            Loews Ventana Canyon Resort, said George Heaney, a bureau chief
                            with the Pima County Sheriff's Department.
                            Smoke roiled in ravines along the face of the mountains late
                            Sunday afternoon. Helicopters dropped water as the flames moved
                            downhill through rocky desert terrain.
                            Sharon Swofford, loading bags into a car with her husband, said
                            resort guests were set up with rooms at another Tucson resort.
                            "We called last week about canceling. They said they weren't
                            really concerned. When we checked in Friday night, they said not to
                            worry," said Swofford, of Washington D.C. "It was fun watching
                            the helicopters though."
                            Sheriff's deputies knocked on doors to urge Ventana Canyon
                            residents to evacuate.
                            About half of those contacted said they would leave, said Sgt.
                            Jim Ogden of the Pima County Sheriff's Department. A hotel
                            spokeswoman didn't return a message seeking the number of guests on
                            Sunday.
                            Lines created by burnouts, clearing brush and thinning trees
                            continued to hold Sunday around dozens of other homes and cabins,
                            several youth camps, an observatory and communications towers
                            operated by organizations including the Federal Aviation
                            Administration.
                            As the situation on top of the mountain looked better, the fire
                            kept creeping down the mountain face toward the foothills.
                            Officials said they could snuff it with helicopter water drops and
                            backburns and that thin desert vegetation in the foothills would
                            make the fire easy to fight if it approached homes.
                            The fire also was about a half-mile from the visitor center at
                            Sabino Canyon, a popular recreation area that was closed due to the
                            fire.
                            The human-caused fire destroyed 317 homes last month in and
                            around the vacation hamlet of Summerhaven.
                            In New Mexico, the southern edge of a 3,000-acre wildfire
                            burning on Taos Pueblo land is commanding firefighters' attention
                            after the blaze doubled in size Sunday.
                            Crews Monday will work to build a dozer line between the
                            Encebado Fire and Taos Canyon, where U.S. 64 passes summer and
                            year-round homes, bed-and-breakfast inns and rental cabins,
                            officials said.
                            On Friday, the lightning-caused fire burned to within a
                            half-mile of the village, which is one of New Mexico's major
                            tourist draws.
                            Elsewhere:
                            - A fire on the Colville Indian Reservation in north-central
                            Washington state swelled to 3,000 acres overnight, increasing its
                            coverage area nearly 50 percent by Sunday.
                            - A smaller fire in Washington consumed 700 acres on the Spokane
                            Indian Reservation to the east, and up north in the Pasayten
                            Wilderness, three fires covered a total of about 1,680 acres.
                            - In central Oregon, three people died Sunday in a collision
                            between a car and truck hauling fire equipment to a 600-acre
                            wildfire, police said. Officials said they did not consider the
                            fire to be the cause of the deaths.
                            There have been no fire fatalities in the West so far this
                            summer.
                            Smaller fires were reported in Colorado, Idaho, Montana and
                            Utah, the National Interagency Fire Center reported Sunday. So far
                            this year, about 923,000 acres of brush, grass and forest have
                            burned, less than one-third the acreage that burned during the same
                            period last year, the center said.
                            ---
                            On the Net:
                            National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

                            (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              July 7th

                              TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) - A rise in humidity calmed a wildfire
                              burning a half-mile from an exclusive desert enclave Monday,
                              greatly reducing the danger to dozens of houses, officials said.
                              The same blaze destroyed more than 300 houses last month in and
                              around the vacation hamlet of Summerhaven, high on Mount Lemmon. As
                              of Monday, the fire had burned at least 81,000 acres in the
                              mountains north of Tucson.
                              Humidity between 30 percent and 50 percent extinguished flames
                              in some areas above the homes in Ventana Canyon and cooled the fire
                              in others, said Brad Smith, a fire behavior analyst with the team
                              fighting the blaze.
                              Firefighters used aircraft to drop water and retardant along the
                              fire's leading edge, but because of the change in the fire's
                              behavior, they dropped plans to burn away vegetation uphill from
                              the homes.
                              Still, "there's all sorts of things that could happen," said
                              Duane Archuleta, an operations chief for the fire team.
                              On Sunday, residents were urged to evacuate about 200 homes, and
                              about 250 guests had to leave a resort hotel as the wind drove the
                              fire downhill into Ventana Canyon, on the edge of Tucson.
                              Officials said the voluntary evacuations were requested in part
                              so firefighters would not have to worry about residents in the
                              area. Fire officials expressed confidence that the homes would be
                              safe because many of them are made of stone and brick.
                              In northern New Mexico, crews planned to bulldoze a firebreak to
                              protect Taos Canyon - site of summer and year-round homes,
                              bed-and-breakfast inns and rental cabins - from a 2,500-acre blaze
                              near Taos Pueblo.
                              The southern edge of the lightning-caused fire was a few miles
                              from the canyon, fire officials said.
                              Elsewhere, fires were active in Colorado, Idaho, Montana,
                              Oklahoma, Oregon, Utah and Washington. So far this year, wildfires
                              have charred about 924,000 acres, less than one-third the acreage
                              burned during the same period last year, according to the National
                              Interagency Fire Center.
                              ---
                              On the Net:
                              National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
                              http://www.fs.fed.us/r3/coronado/aspen.html

                              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                WASHINGTON (AP) - President Bush declared a disaster area Monday
                                in stretches of Pima County burned by a major wildfire, making
                                federal aid available to help repair and replace public facilities
                                destroyed by the blaze.
                                The declaration also allows counties across the state to apply
                                to the Federal Emergency Management Agency for aid to help cut down
                                trees in overgrown forests to help reduce the threat of future
                                wildfires.
                                "This is a very important first step to rebuild Summerhaven
                                because we will get that funding to get the roads and utilities
                                back because any rebuilding of the community has to start with that
                                infrastructure," said Paul Allvin, spokesman for Gov. Janet
                                Napolitano, who filed the request.
                                The White House said damage surveys continue in areas outside
                                Pima County and more counties and additional forms of assistance
                                could be designated.
                                Under the president's declaration, FEMA will cover 75 percent of
                                the costs to rebuild public buildings, utilities and roads. The
                                county is responsible for the rest.
                                "The big things were the infrastructure on the water and
                                getting electricity going again, the fire department itself, and
                                starting the work on rehabilitation and erosion control," said
                                Sen. Jon Kyl, R-Ariz., who was among the members of the Arizona
                                delegation who pressed for the declaration.
                                The Aspen blaze in the mountains near Tucson, Ariz., has
                                blackened 84,750 and destroyed 340 buildings around Summerhaven
                                since it ignited June 17. It is 90 percent contained and crews hope
                                to have it fully contained by Tuesday.
                                Authorities have issued a reward for information on 10 people
                                who were in the area when the fire started.
                                FEMA did not grant Napolitano's request for aid for private
                                homeowners who lost property or incurred other costs as a result of
                                the fire, because most of the costs of evacuation and temporary
                                shelter were covered by groups like the American Red Cross, said
                                Jean Baker, spokeswoman for FEMA's Region 9, which includes
                                Arizona.
                                In addition, 90 percent of the residences burned were covered by
                                private insurance, and the vast majority were vacation or secondary
                                homes, which do not qualify for FEMA aid, Baker said.
                                Kyl said some assistance may still come through the Small
                                Business Administration.
                                Baker said a field office would be set up in Arizona shortly to
                                process requests for assistance.
                                "The presidential disaster declaration could not have come at a
                                better time," said Rep. Jim Kolbe, R-Ariz. "The fires have taken
                                a considerable financial and emotional toll on those who have lost
                                their homes or have been forced to move out of their homes. The
                                disaster assistance will be much needed relief and will help the
                                residents get back on their feet more quickly."
                                Also on Monday, Kyl sent a letter to Interior Secretary Gale
                                Norton and Agriculture Secretary Ann Veneman asking them to
                                expedite fire-prevention efforts on 15,129 acres of Arizona
                                forests.
                                Kyl asked the secretaries to exercise new authority that exempts
                                critical projects from the normal environmental studies and
                                administrative appeals.
                                "It is clear that we have another catastrophe that we can see
                                coming," he wrote. "I urge both of you to take whatever actions
                                are necessary to exercise immediately the authorities you possess
                                to expedite treatment of the conditions now threatening the
                                integrity of these forest ecosystems."

                                (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                                Comment

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