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  • Utah 2003 season activity

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Utah's first large wildfire of the season
    has burned over about 1,700 acres about 20 miles southwest of
    Hanksville in southern Utah, and firefighters are taking a slow,
    low-cost approach to attacking it.
    The blaze started Friday evening when lightning struck a tree
    near the Lonesome Beaver Campground in the Henry Mountains.
    The fire is burning largely in pinon and juniper, Bureau of Land
    Management spokesman Bert Hart said. "The fuels are extremely dry.
    They just haven't had a chance to recover."
    Wind and heat caused the fire to expand rapidly on Wednesday,
    but it settled down some on Thursday as the weather turned cooler
    and winds were lower, Hart said.
    The fire has extended into two wilderness study areas, and there
    are a few cabins and three camp grounds in the area.
    Hart said the options for attacking the fire were full
    suppression, concentrating on protecting structures or just letting
    it go.
    He said officials picked the middle road, protecting structures.
    "We're trying to keep the cost down," he said.
    There is no projected date of containment and the fire may burn
    for weeks, he said.
    Hart said 200 personnel, aided by two helicopters and five
    engines, were expected to be on the blaze Friday.
    Some area roads have been closed.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  • #2
    Utah's first large wildfire settling down

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - Utah's first large wildfire of the season
    was right where firefighters wanted it on Monday, and forest
    managers say the blaze will ultimately make the Henry Mountains
    forest more healthy.
    The fire, which was started by a lightning strike near the
    Lonesome Beaver campground more than a week ago, had burned 2,558
    acres by Monday morning, said Susan Marzec, spokeswoman for the
    Bureau of Land Management.
    It burned pinyon and juniper trees at around 9,000 feet in
    elevation, in an area 30 miles south of Hanksville.
    "It's been burning cool," Marzec said. That means the flames
    were consuming dead wood and debris - but leaving the healthy trees
    and their seeds alive.
    "This part of the mountain had a lot of fuel on it. It hasn't
    burned in years and years," she said.
    With the dead wood burned away, the forest will grow healthier
    in the future, she said.
    The BLM had 162 firefighters with five engines and a helicopter
    working on the fire. They spent the weekend trying to surround the
    blaze with fire lines. Marzec said the weather favored their
    efforts.
    "It's actually looking pretty good," she said. No one had been
    injured and no homes were in danger.
    There is a free-ranging bison herd in that part of the Henry
    Mountains, but Marzec said the animals know how to get themselves
    out of the way when wildfire strikes.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

    Comment


    • #3
      July 7th

      (Salt Lake City-AP) -- A wildfire that has burned more than
      27-hundred acres in a wilderness area west of Blanding was
      apparently caused by an abandoned campfire.
      The fire began on June 28th in the Dark Canyon Wilderness Area
      of the Manti-LaSal National Forest.
      Forest Service fire information officer John Daugherty says the
      sheriff's office is looking for information on anyone camping in
      Woodenshoe or Cherry Canyons late last month.
      About 160 people are working on the fire, which has been 50
      percent contained. Resources include four fire crews, three
      helicopters and eight engines.


      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Utah Update

        Some fires contained, but others ignite
        By Laura Hancock
        Deseret Morning News

        Crews are containing Utah's largest wildfires, but a handful of new blazes have ignited throughout the state.
        Chris Brenchley, a fire weather forecaster for the National Weather Service in Salt Lake City, said it's the season of "prime fire weather."
        "Any fires that start rapidly take off," Brenchley said. "The fuels have been stressed by drought for the past — depending on where you are in Utah — at least the last five years. That takes the moisture out of big fuels like fir trees, aspens. To top it off, we had all that grass from the spring rains."
        In the Fishlake National Forest, crews in Sevier County are fighting a new 77-acre fire south of Mount Marvine, where spruce and Douglas fir trees are providing fuel. Lightning sparked the blaze July 2.
        Two "hot shot" crews experienced in technical firefighting are on scene. The fire is burning in steep and rocky terrain. Three helicopters and several ground crews also are fighting the fire. The goal is to build a firebreak near the ridge top along the west flank of the fire, according to a Forest Service statement.







        The Forest Service has not closed any roads but is asking travelers to drive on tarred roads and be cautious. Pilots must keep aircraft five miles from the fire and at 15,400 feet. For clearance to fly in the area, call 435-979-2838.
        In Morgan County, a 20-acre blaze briefly threatened nearby houses, but crews used bulldozers to build a firebreak. The fire started Monday, and its cause is under investigation. It was contained and controlled by Monday night, said Jim McMahill of the Bureau of Land Management.
        Sparks flying from a train are believed to have started a brush fire outside of Vernon, Tooele County, Monday. The fire was contained and controlled by Monday afternoon. The fire burned one-tenth of an acre, McMahill said.
        A handful of federal and local firefighting crews remain on the scene of the Apex fire, 10 miles west of St. George. It was 100 percent contained and controlled last Friday. Crews are monitoring the fire's activity and will reseed the vegetation in the area. The fire has burned 33,000 acres, according to fire officials.
        Pinyon Pine-Juniper trees, sage and black brush, and a non-native grass fueled the flames. Crews also will determine ways to prevent erosion, which could be a problem in hilly areas where roots that held the soil were burned.
        The Woodenshoe fire, five miles west of Blanding in the Dark Canyon Wilderness Area of the Manti-La Sal National Forest, is expected to be contained by 6 p.m. Wednesday. By Monday night, the 2,710-acre blaze was 50 percent contained, said fire information officer John Daugherty. Investigators determined it was started by an abandoned or escaped campfire, he said.
        Authorities are seeking information from anyone who camped in the area from June 26-28. They ask the public to call the San Juan County Sheriff's Office at 435-587-2237.
        "It was much quieter today. Crews continue to tighten up fire lines, mop up," Daugherty said Monday.
        About 160 people are on scene, including three helicopters, he said.
        Front line since 1983 and still going strong

        Comment


        • #5
          July 14th

          HUNTSVILLE, Utah (AP) - A fire started Monday, possibly by
          sparks from a backhoe, was believed to have destroyed six or seven
          summer residences east of Huntsville near the Causey Reservoir.
          The blaze, dubbed the Evergreen fire, started about 2 p.m.
          Monday on private land in the Evergreen development and had spread
          to 350 to 500 acres by early Tuesday, said Kathy Jo Pollock,
          Wasatch-Cache National Forest spokeswoman.
          A voluntary evacuation was suggested for the Sourdough,
          Evergreen and Beaver Creek developments, which contain several
          hundred summer and year-round residences.
          Pollock said that from the air it appeared six or seven
          residences - cabins or trailers - had been destroyed and a
          fire-engine crew reported another had been damaged.
          The fire was about 20 percent contained, she said.
          Some residents reported that the fire started when a backhoe
          struck a rock, causing sparks that ignited dry grass.
          Pollock said Utah Power & Light cut power to the three areas so
          the fire burning underneath lines would not cause arcing.
          About 90 firefighters, aided by five helicopters, two air
          tankers and five engines, were battling the fire, and Pollock said
          another four crews - 80 firefighters - were expected in the
          morning.
          Three of the helicopters were diverted to the Evergreen fire
          from the Farmington Canyon fire, which to 1,935 acres on Monday,
          but was 70 percent contained.
          Fire information officer Steve Segin said 297 personnel were
          assigned to that blaze.
          The Farmington fire was started Thursday. A homeless man, Joseph
          Heinz Bruhl, 33, told law enforcement officers he started the fire
          because he wanted to go to jail. He was charged Friday with causing
          a catastrophe.
          Elsewhere, the 126-acre Jacob Ranch west of Utah Lake was
          controlled Monday. The fire was believed caused by target shooting.
          Firefighters also continued to battle the 18,606-acre Bulldog
          fire in the Henry Mountains in southern Utah, which was believed
          started by an all-terrain vehicle that had been driven off-road. A
          teenager was being investigated, said Susan Marzec, a Bureau of
          Land Management fire information officer.
          In another development, the total cost of the Apex fire, the
          state's largest so far this season at 30,000 acres, has been
          estimated at $2.2 million so far. Rehabilitation costs could add
          another $1 million, said David Boyd, fire information officer. That
          fire, in southwestern Utah, was started by two teenagers playing
          with matches.
          No decision has been made on charges, said Washington County
          Attorney Brock Belnap.

          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment


          • #6
            July 15th

            By DEBBIE HUMMEL
            Associated Press Writer
            HUNTSVILLE, Utah (AP) - A relatively small but devastating
            wildfire, ignited by sparks from a backhoe driving over a rock, had
            destroyed six summer homes and left several others damaged when the
            smoke cleared Tuesday east of Huntsville near the Causey Reservoir.
            Among the residences destroyed was a trailer owned by Steve
            Garcia, of West Point. He looked a pile of rubble on the charred
            ground. Also destroyed in the fire was a trailer belong to Garcia's
            father.
            "Man, that didn't leave nothing, did it?" he said. "We were
            up here last week, we had a big family reunion up here a month
            ago."
            The blaze, dubbed the Evergreen fire, started Monday afternoon
            on private land in the Evergreen development and had blackened 360
            acres by late Tuesday, said Ted Black, Weber District Fire
            Marshall.
            The fire was about 80 percent contained, he said. It was
            expected to be fully contained later Tuesday despite searing
            temperatures and higher winds, Black said.
            Garcia's family has been coming to the area for about 10 years.
            "As long as nobody's hurt," Garcia said. "We can replace the
            trailer, but the scenery is going to be kind of hard."
            Garcia and his father had discussed the fire danger just last
            week and talked about moving their trailers off the land, he said.
            The conditions were as dry as they had ever seen them.
            Officials say the fire started when the track of a backhoe
            struck a rock, causing sparks that ignited dry grass. The
            Sourdough, Evergreen and Beaver Creek developments, which contain
            several hundred summer and year-round residences, were evacuated
            Monday. People were expected to return to their homes or to assess
            damage later Tuesday, Black said.
            "That's the point, if sparks can do this much damage imagine
            what a careless cigarette butt, a match or an unattended campfire
            can do," said Black, who had led Garcia up to the fire area to
            view the damage.
            Equipment and crews were readily available from the nearby
            Farmington Canyon fire that had threatened homes last week and was
            now nearly contained.
            "It cooled right down last night, we had no down canyon winds,
            everything went our way," he said. "But anytime even a single
            individual is impacted this much it's a catastrophe."
            About 90 firefighters, aided by five helicopters, two air
            tankers and five engines, battled the fire. A helicopter and
            firefighters remained Tuesday to handle hot spots.
            Many of those resources were diverted to the Evergreen fire from
            the Farmington Canyon fire, which grew to 1,935 acres on Tuesday
            but was 70 percent contained.
            Several helicopters were making passes to drop water on hot
            spots on the east side of the fire, said Dorothy Harvey, fire
            information officer. Nearly 300 personnel were still assigned to
            that blaze, she said.
            The Farmington fire was started Thursday. A homeless man, Joseph
            Heinz Bruhl, 33, told authorities he started the fire because he
            wanted to go to jail. He was charged Friday with causing a
            catastrophe.
            The increased activity in northern Utah prompted new fire
            restrictions that prohibit the use of open fires or camp fires,
            except in developed recreation sites. Those rules take effect at
            12:01 a.m. Thursday in Davis County and the Wasatch-Cache National
            Forest, the Rocky Mountain Incident Management Team said Tuesday.
            In Southern Utah, firefighters continued to battle the
            28,382-acre Bulldog fire in the Henry Mountains. Officials say the
            fire was likely started by an all-terrain vehicle that had been
            driven off-road. A teenager was being investigated, said Susan
            Marzec, a Bureau of Land Management fire information officer.
            The fire was 10 percent contained, and had likely grown to more
            than 30,000 acres Tuesday, said Lisa Reid, a BLM fire information
            officer. Two cabins dating back to the early 1900s were destroyed
            in the fire, as well as two vacant mining shacks, Reid said.
            There were seven structures threatened Tuesday, she said. Crews
            were cutting back foliage around those buildings, wrapping them
            with heat reflecting material and putting foam on the roofs to
            protect them if the fire approaches.

            ---
            On the Net:
            Utah wildfires: http://www.utahfireinfo.gov/
            National Interagency Wildland Fires:
            http://www.nifc.gov/fireinfo/nfn.html

            (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

            Comment


            • #7
              July 16th

              By DEBBIE HUMMEL
              Associated Press Writer
              SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - A fire in the Henry Mountains of
              southeastern Utah grew to nearly 33,000 acres Wednesday, making it
              the state's largest blaze of the wildfire season.
              The Bulldog fire - which began July 8 and is named for various
              "Bulldog"-titled geographic landmarks in the area - was 30
              perecent contained as crews focused on shielding several cabins in
              the mountain range 17 miles north of Ticaboo.
              Linda Hixon, who has lived in the area for more than eight
              years, said she sensed late last week that the fire would be a
              problem. She started packing up sentimental belongings and by
              Sunday, she and her husband had emptied the house with the help of
              co-workers at the Offshore Marina at Lake Powell.
              The fire approached the home Sunday night, charring the ground
              around it. For now, the house is safe.
              "The crews they've brought in are focused specifically on
              structures and they've done an amazing job," she said. "It's just
              amazing. I don't know that there's ever words to thank them for
              what they've done."
              The Hixons are staying at the marina until the Bureau of Land
              Management allows them to return. That won't be anytime soon;
              flames flared up in her driveway late Tuesday, she said.
              Protecting cabins and homes in the area remains a major focus
              for firefighters, said Murray Shoemaker, BLM fire information
              officer.
              "We had some private residences south in the Gold Creek and
              Star Springs areas and those were saved," he said. "North of the
              fire ... there's a number of structures up there. Our crews are
              searching those out."
              Authorities also fear that bison, deer and elk herds may be in
              danger. Wildlife resources officials are reporting sightings of
              animals moving away from the fire, Shoemaker said, and no dead
              animals have been found.
              Officials say the blaze was started by an all-terrain vehicle
              that was on a road in the area and may have backed into dry grass
              while turning around. Heat from some part of the vehicle may have
              ignited the fire, Shoemaker said.
              Nearly 350 personnel worked against the blaze Wednesday, aided
              by four helicopters, nine engines and two water tankers.
              At 32,980 acres, this fire has surpassed the size of the Apex
              Fire, which burned 30,000 acres near St. George earlier this month.
              In northern Utah, the Evergreen fire east of Ogden, which burned
              486 acres and destroyed six summer homes, was declared contained on
              Tuesday. The fire was started by sparks from a backhoe driving over
              a rock.
              The 1,935-acre Farmington Canyon Fire just north of Salt Lake
              City was 80 percent contained. Four smaller fires burning in Utah
              on Wednesday were listed as contained.
              ---
              On the Net:
              Utah wildfires: http://www.utahfireinfo.gov/
              National Interagency Wildland Fires:
              http://www.nifc.gov/fireinfo/nfn.html

              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

              Comment


              • #8
                July 17th

                SALT LAKE CITY (AP) - A fire in the Henry Mountains of
                southeastern Utah grew to more than 33,000 acres Thursday.
                The Bulldog fire - which began July 8 and is named for various
                geographic landmarks in the area - remains at 30 percent contained
                in the mountain range 17 miles north of Ticaboo.
                Protecting cabins and homes in the area remains a focus for
                firefighters, said Lisa Reid, Bureau of Land Management fire
                information officer. "But we're not as critical as we were," she
                said.
                The most significant development was road closures in the area,
                Reid said.
                "Right now in essence the Henry Mountains are closed to public
                access," she said.
                With the fire at only 30 percent contained and the potential for
                flare-ups, the closures were a matter of public safety and in the
                best interest of crews focusing on fighting the fire, she said.
                Officials say the blaze, which has burned 33,080 acres, was
                started by an all-terrain vehicle that backed into dry grass while
                turning around, possibly igniting the fire.
                Elsewhere, the 1,935-acre Farmington Canyon fire just north of
                Salt Lake City was 95 percent contained.
                "It's going to be smoking probably for the next couple of weeks
                and we know that there going to have hot spots I'd say for at least
                a month, especially if this warm weather sticks around," said
                Kathy Jo Pollock, spokeswoman for the Wasatch-Cache National
                Forest.
                The Woodenshoe fire in the Dark Canyon Wilderness Area, 25 miles
                west of Blanding has burned 2,710 acres. The fire has been listed
                at 95 percent contained for the last several days.
                ---
                On the Net:
                Utah wildfires: http://www.utahfireinfo.gov/
                National Interagency Wildland Fires:
                http://www.nifc.gov/fireinfo/nfn.html

                (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  AMERICAN FORK CANYON, Utah (AP) - A federal study investigating
                  a prescribed burn of 600 acres that ultimately raged out of control
                  after wind scattered embers could be completed Friday.
                  An 11-member U.S. Forest Service team, featuring experts in
                  firefighting and meteorology, will write a report based on their
                  findings of the Cascade Springs II wildfire last month.
                  This week, they will examine Cascade Springs, interview
                  residents and pore over data from the fire that burned nearly 8,000
                  acres and filled three valleys with smoky air for nearly a week.
                  Public meetings were scheduled Tuesday in Provo and Wednesday in
                  Heber City.
                  Team leader Ronnie Raum said members have been given specific
                  questions to address, such as whether policies and procedures need
                  to be adjusted.
                  "We want to be successful in achieving an open, honest and
                  factual review of what happened on this fire," Raum said.
                  "We want to identify lessons learned from this experience and
                  make whatever changes are necessary to help us do a better job on
                  future prescribed burns," Raum said.
                  Spokesman Ed Waldapfel said the team's report will address such
                  questions as:
                  - Did workers charged with planning and starting the controlled
                  burn meet qualification standards as established in the forest
                  service manual?
                  - Were national and regional policies followed when starting the
                  fire?
                  - Did the burn plan and the actual implementation of the
                  prescribed fire adequately address air-quality issues?
                  - Was the prescribed burn plan properly prepared and
                  implemented?
                  - What were the weather conditions on the day of the fire? Did
                  the controlled-burn plan take weather conditions, including the
                  five-year drought, into account?
                  - What were the contingency plans?
                  Waldapfel said the team will try to have a report ready for
                  inspection by their supervisors by Friday.
                  The team was appointed the regional forester and draws from
                  personnel in Missouri, Idaho, Utah, Oregon and California.

                  (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    10/29

                    SPRINGVILLE, Utah (AP) - High winds that blew into the state in
                    advance of a cold front hampered firefighters' efforts to control
                    the Cherry Creek blaze Wednesday.
                    The fire has burned 2,740 acres near Springville and was about
                    15 percent contained, said Erin Darboven, fire information officer
                    for the Bureau of Land Management.
                    "We had a tough day fighting the fire today. But we knew that
                    from the get-go," Darboven said.
                    Air operations for the fire had to be grounded due to the high
                    winds. A fire crew was removed for safety reasons because of the
                    winds unpredictability, Darboven said.
                    There are homes less than two miles away from the fire but no
                    structures were threatened.
                    Investigators say a spark from a passing vehicle caught the dry
                    roadside brush on fire last Saturday. They have ruled the fire
                    accidental.
                    Elsewhere in the state, the U.S. Forest Service is pulling crews
                    off the fire burning in Shepard Canyon near Farmington.
                    That fire started last Thursday night in thick, dense brush. It
                    has burned 391 acres and is fully contained, though officials are
                    not yet calling it controlled.
                    Officials said one engine is available in case of any flare-ups.
                    Utah Power and Light officials said a downed powerline was
                    responsible for ignited that blaze.

                    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)

                    APTV 10-29-03 2000EST
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                    Comment

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