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  • #16
    7/31

    Firefighters contained another major wildfire Thursday, but new
    fires broke out in the Bridger-Teton National Forest and on Casper
    Mountain.
    The Casper fire is believed to have started when lightning
    struck a tree Wednesday night. The fire smoldered until it burst
    into flame Thursday. It has burned about 60 acres.
    "Structures are within one-half mile of the fire," said Mark
    Amann of the Denver-based Rocky Mountain Area Coordination Center,
    which tracks wildfires in the region.
    None of the structures was threatened and no evacuations had
    been ordered, but Wyoming Highway 251, the Casper Mountain Road,
    was closed to nonresidents.
    About 50 firefighters were on scene.
    In the Bridger-Teton forest, a fire ignited about two miles
    northwest of the Forest Park Campground. The Upper Cabin Creek fire
    was discovered Thursday afternoon and had burned 5 acres in light
    timber. A 20-member crew and two helicopters were on scene.
    The Ditch Creek fire was fully contained Thursday after burning
    370 acres outside Story in the Bighorn National Forest. It has cost
    $1.1 million to fight.
    "The big thing (Friday) is just taking care of little spot
    fires and mopping up," Amann said. The blaze was started July 21
    by lightning.
    Most of the 195 firefighters still on scene were expected to
    begin heading elsewhere Friday.
    Crews on the Big Spring fire southwest of Buffalo were expected
    to conduct a 480-acre burnout to reduce the risk of the fire
    spreading to the south, fire information officer Lynn Pisano-Pedigo
    said.
    About 20 acres was intentionally burned Thursday to slow the
    main fire's spread.
    Because of the pending burnout, containment has dropped to 80
    percent on the 2,900-acre fire, and estimated full containment,
    which initially was projected for Thursday, has been pushed back to
    Saturday.
    "As soon as that burnout is completed the percentage should go
    up," Amann said.
    The fire has cost more than $2.1 million to fight. It started
    July 19 by lightning.
    Crews fully contained the Red Point fire in the Black Hills
    National Forest on Wednesday night. The fire, which burned mainly
    in South Dakota, had scorched 17,500 acres and cost $3.3 million to
    fight.
    Several major fires have erupted in Wyoming this summer, but no
    structures have been lost. The first large fire started July 12 in
    the Snake River Canyon. Last year, fires broke out in early June.

    ----
    On the Net:
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

    Comment


    • #17
      7/3

      Containment of two of the state's remaining wildfires was
      expected by Sunday evening as conditions for new fires grew to
      dangerous levels and crews battled two small fires in Yellowstone
      National Park.
      The lightning-caused Red Creek fire was 95 percent contained
      Sunday after burning 117 acres of ponderosa pine, downed timber and
      grass on the southwest side of Casper Mountain.
      More than 70 firefighters were battling the blaze, down from 160
      on Saturday, said Mark Amann of the Rocky Mountain Coordination
      Center in Denver. Containment was expected Monday.
      "Crews worked very hard to contain this fire quickly,"
      incident commander Eric Fransted said. "Now we are in the process
      of mopping up."
      Micro Road and South Circle Drive remained closed to everyone
      but residents, and the sheriff's department also shut down a county
      campground at an archery range for safety reasons.
      Containment of the Big Spring fire southwest of Buffalo was
      expected Tuesday.
      The fire grew to 3,085 acres after an intentional burn to remove
      vegetation in the path of the fire. Just 36 firefighters were left
      on the fire, which has cost $2.2 million to fight.
      "They had some interior action and they're still continuing
      with mop up," Berglund said. "There was some torching and runs
      that were made but so far they're holding their own."
      Crews were also fighting two fires in Yellowstone, though
      neither was threatening structures or any of the park's popular
      features. The Judo fire, started Saturday by humans, burned 25
      acres near the Canyon before it was contained, officials said.
      The lightning-caused Grizzly fire, also reported Saturday, was
      burning on 2 acres east of Yellowstone Lake. Fire crews were on
      scene.
      A red flag warning, meanwhile, was issued Sunday for the Bighorn
      Mountains in north-central Wyoming, where dry lightning storms and
      high winds were possible. A fire weather watch, the next step down,
      was posted for parts of northeast Wyoming and the Black Hills.
      "A red flag means there's going to be some difficulty in
      control and danger of spreading and threats in the immediate
      vicinity with any fires," Berglund said.
      The largest blaze in Wyoming this summer, the Deep Lake fire in
      the Beartooth Mountains north of Cody, has charred 6,886 acres. The
      fire was 55 percent contained and likely won't be fully contained
      until significant rain or snow falls.
      ----
      On the Net:
      National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov


      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment


      • #18
        8/4

        Crews contain Red Creek fire as Big Spring grows

        (Undated-AP) -- Crews fully contained a fire on Casper Mountain
        tonight but had trouble with a second fire near Buffalo.
        The Big Spring fire is now threatening six homes on its north
        side. The fire grew by 100 acres today after burning into a
        drainage area.
        Nearly 70 firefighters are battling the 31-hundred-acre blaze
        and more are being ordered. Three helicopters are also on scene.
        Containment has again been pushed back to Thursday.
        Crews, meanwhile, contained the Red Creek fire at 117 acres
        tonight. All crews have been demobilized and sent elsewhere.
        A wildfire in Yellowstone National Park grew to 12 acres today
        but is threatening no structures or park attractions.
        Hand crews and smokejumpers are battling the Grizzly fire, which
        is burning in a pine forest east of Yellowstone Lake.

        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #19
          August 11th

          PARKMAN, Wyo. (AP) - Twenty summer cabins in north-central
          Wyoming were evacuated because of a quickly growing wildfire in the
          Bighorn National Forest, officials said Monday.
          The fire was one of scores in Wyoming sparked by lightning over
          the weekend. Another temporarily closed roads in Jackson Hole,
          including the main route through Grand Teton National Park.
          At least seven fires in the state were burning on at least 100
          acres. Across the West, there were 37 large fires.
          In the Big Horn Mountains near the Montana border, occupants of
          a summer home group were not being allowed to retrieve any items
          because of the danger of the Little Horn 2 fire. The blaze is on a
          ridge on the west side of the Little Bighorn Canyon above the
          homes, Bighorn forest spokeswoman Patti Bell said.
          "There is not immediate concern about the fire reaching the
          area," she said. "However, structure protection is in place due
          to concern about sparks and embers flying into the area of the
          cabins. Crews are working to spray down the area to prevent any
          sparks from taking light."
          Lightning started the blaze Saturday about 15 miles west of
          Parkman and a mile south of the Montana border. By Monday evening
          it had grown to 125 acres, crisping ponderosa pine and Douglas fir
          while spreading north and south. Containment was at zero percent.
          Temperatures in the 90s, relative humidities in the low 20s and
          gusty winds contributed to growth, Bell said. The forecast was for
          "continuous high burning conditions with no relief in site for at
          least the next week."
          Sunday, local crews worked with two helicopters making water
          bucket drops, and air tankers dropped five loads of retardant.
          Crews were digging a fire break between the fire and the homes
          at the base of the canyon. The area has very steep slopes, and
          forest officials were controlling access into the canyon and trails
          in the area.
          Also in the Big Horns, a fire had burned 105 acres about 15
          miles west of Kaycee.
          Meanwhile, crews continued to battle the Big Spring fire
          southwest of Buffalo. The fire was 80 percent contained, and full
          containment was expected Thursday. The fire has cost more than $3.3
          million to fight since it began July 19.
          In northwest Wyoming, the Blacktail fire east of Jackson Hole
          Airport forced park officials to close Highway 26/89/191 in Grand
          Teton National Park for several hours Sunday evening. The Gros
          Ventre Road into Kelly was also closed for a time. Some campers
          left the Gros Ventre Campground because of smoke.
          Rain and improved weather helped firefighters, and the highway
          was open Monday morning along with all park services and
          attractions. The 700-acre fire was 50 percent contained.
          "All the services are operating under normal circumstances,"
          park spokeswoman Joan Anzelmo said Monday.
          Lightning over the weekend sparked 16 wildfires in Yellowstone
          National Park. All were small and in remote areas and did not
          affect tourist attractions. The largest, 600 acres, was being
          allowed to burn itself out on Frank Island on Yellowstone Lake.
          Six fires were started in the Bridger-Teton National Forest. The
          largest was 80 acres, on Lloyd Creek in the Gros Ventre Wilderness.
          Seven wildfires were started on the Shoshone National Forest.
          Fast responses by crews kept all but one to one-tenth of an acre or
          less. The largest was 6 acres, located in the Crow Creek drainage
          about 52 miles west of Cody.
          On Saturday, a thunderstorm caused some flare-ups in the Deep
          Lake fire west of Clark that started July 16. The back side of the
          fire is being allowed to burn due to concerns for firefighter
          safety in the extremely rugged terrain.
          In southeast Wyoming, a fire spewing 5-foot flames threatened a
          ranch about eight miles south of Lusk. The fire was started by
          lightning on Saturday and had burned 120 acres.
          On Monday, crews built lines and conducted burns to rob the fire
          of fuel. They had 10 percent of the fire contained Monday
          afternoon, according to fire spokeswoman Lesley Collins.
          In southwest Wyoming, nearly 30 wildfires have started since
          Friday, U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials said.
          Lightning was blamed for a fire about 15 miles south of Rock
          Springs, burning about 160 acres of mixed juniper and sage.
          A fire on Pine Mountain near the Utah-Colorado border had burned
          about 20 acres. A blaze in Uinta County had burned 15 acres north
          of Interstate 80 and west of U.S. 189.

          ----
          On the Net:
          National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
          Yellowstone fires: http://www.nps.gov/yell/technical/fire
          Grand Teton, Bridger-Teton forest fires:
          http://www.tetonfires.com

          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment


          • #20
            8/12/03

            By The Associated Press
            A fast-growing wildfire closed the east entrance to Yellowstone
            National Park on Tuesday night as crews continued efforts to
            protect 20 cabins in the Big Horn Mountains from another blaze that
            more than doubled in size.
            The park's East Entrance Road was closed at about 5:30 p.m.
            after the 1,900-acre fire crept to within one-eighth mile of the
            road near Cub Creek, park spokeswoman Marsha Karle said.
            The west end of the road was still open, and no structures were
            threatened by the blaze, which was started Monday by lightning.
            Helicopters were dropping water to prevent the fire from spreading,
            Karle said.
            Scores of other fires were burning elsewhere in Wyoming,
            including Grand Teton National Park, south of Lusk, west of Kaycee,
            southwest of Buffalo and in Sweetwater County.
            In the Bighorn National Forest, crews were trying to hold ground
            against the 700-acre Little Horn Two fire, which threatened to rain
            embers down on the 20 evacuated cabins from a rocky ridge.
            Winds from an overnight thunderstorm fanned the fire.
            Crews scraped a line Tuesday on the steep, rocky slope above the
            cabins, but the fire continued moving closer to the homes and
            burned through fire retardant drops, forest spokeswoman Patti Bell
            said.
            The cabins were also fireproofed with water pumps and hoses, and
            combustible materials were removed from roofs, gutters and around
            the homes. A Hot Shots crew was on scene, and three more were
            ordered.
            Another round of dry lightning storms was expected Tuesday
            night. Hot temperatures were also predicted to continue, with
            little relief in sight.
            "Structure protection will be one of the highest priorities
            (Wednesday) with the Hot Shots working on any spotting from the
            ridge trying to keep the fire from slopping over to the area of the
            cabins," Bell said.
            Elsewhere in the Big Horn Mountains area, the 125-acre Middle
            Gate fire 15 miles west of Kaycee was 60 percent contained and full
            containment was predicted for Tuesday evening.
            A heavy helicopter dumped water on the fire Monday, according to
            state Forestry Division spokesman Ray Weidenhaft.
            "That kind of saved our bacon," he said. "We were able to get
            some good support for the hand crews."
            Southwest of Buffalo, firefighters contained the Big Spring fire
            two days early at 3,340 acres. The blaze started three weeks ago
            during a lightning storm and cost $3.3 million to fight.
            In Grand Teton National Park, about 50 firefighters backed up by
            helicopters hoped to fully contain the Blacktail fire by Wednesday.
            U.S. 26/89/191 and Gros Ventre Road between Gros Ventre Junction
            and Kelly were reopened after being closed temporarily.
            The fire grew from 500 acres Monday to 2,730 acres Tuesday, but
            was 50 percent contained.
            "The fire is not moving as rapidly as it did yesterday," park
            spokeswoman Joan Anzelmo said. "It's not growing like it did
            yesterday. Things are looking much better."
            Fifty miles north of Gillette, a fire started by lightning
            Monday had burned 200 acres. It was 60 percent contained.
            Similarly, a 260-acre fire eight miles south of Lusk was 50
            percent contained. More than 115 firefighters were at the Rawhide
            fire after more personnel were ordered, fire information officer
            Lesley Collins said.
            Buildings at a ranch about a mile away were being guarded but
            were not considered in any immediate danger.
            In northwest Wyoming, 12 wildfires had ignited in Bridger-Teton
            National Forest, the largest of which was a 325-acre blaze burning
            near the Gros Ventre Wilderness Area on Lloyd Creek. More than 60
            firefighters were on scene, with full containment expected by
            Thursday, forest spokesman Jason Anderson said.
            Another seven small fires were burning in Shoshone National
            Forest. Yellowstone National Park had 16 fires, including one that
            burned an entire island in Yellowstone Lake.
            In southwest Wyoming, nearly 30 wildfires have started since
            Friday, U.S. Bureau of Land Management officials said.
            Lightning was blamed for a fire about 15 miles south of Rock
            Springs, burning about 160 acres of mixed juniper and sage.
            A fire on Pine Mountain near the Utah-Colorado border had burned
            about 20 acres. A blaze in Uinta County had burned 15 acres north
            of Interstate 80 and west of U.S. 189.

            ----
            On the Net:
            National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
            Yellowstone fires: http://www.nps.gov/yell/technical/fire
            Grand Teton, Bridger-Teton forest fires:
            http://www.tetonfires.com
            Big Horn National Forest fires: http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/bighorn


            (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

            Comment


            • #21
              8/21

              A look at wildfires in Wyoming
              By The Associated Press
              EAST and GRIZZLY - East side of Yellowstone National Park.
              18,300 acres combined. East entrance of park closed. More than 600
              personnel involved in fighting it. Four private vehicles lost.
              TYSON - In Yellowstone, 50 miles west of Cody, 150 acres. 80
              percent contained.
              UNION - Southwest Yellowstone Park. 400 acres. Being allowed to
              burn in a remote area. Being monitored from the air.
              NORRIS - Shoshone National Forest. Thirty-five miles west of
              Cody, 1,000 acres. No containment. Being monitored from the air
              because of its remote location.
              NORTH BIGHORN COMPLEX - Bighorn National Forest. The Little Horn
              2 fire has burned 7,400 acres and the Riley fire 850. Little Horn
              is 70 percent contained. Riley 100 percent contained. Firefighters
              began demobilizing Wednesday.
              BLACKWATER: Shoshone National Forest. Blackwater Creek drainage
              about 40 miles west of Cody. 200 acres. 10 percent contained. 25
              firefighters assigned.
              BOULDER BASIN: Shoshone National Forest. 6,000 acres. Near South
              Fork of Shoshone River. No containment. 50 firefighters.

              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

              Comment


              • #22
                8/25

                Shoshone fires continue to burn

                (Cody-AP) -- Several fires continue to burn today (Monday) in
                the Shoshone (SHOW'-show-nee) National Forest to the east of
                Yellowstone.
                A ten-thousand-500-acre fire in the forest's Washakie Wilderness
                is 20 percent contained. Firefighters are working to keep the
                Boulder Basin fire from burning into drainage basins occupied by a
                campground, several homes and historic structures.
                The fire did see increased activity because of warmer and drier
                weather but didn't spread a lot.
                Firefighters doused several spot fires ahead of the main fire.
                Crews also are working to keep the Boulder Basin fire from
                spreading into the Boulder Creek area.
                Two other fires are burning west of Cody. Neither fire was
                threatening any structures.
                And five fires burning in the Teton Wilderness Area, the
                Jedediah Smith Wilderness Area, and near Jackson Lake in Grand
                Teton National Park are being allowed to burn to improve forest
                health.

                (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                Comment


                • #23
                  Winter Wildfire

                  CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - A grass fire fanned by 50-mph winds
                  destroyed two structures and scorched 5,700 acres of prairie about
                  10 miles southeast of Cheyenne on Tuesday.
                  "We had a fairly large grass fire. In fact it's about five to
                  six miles long and one-and-a-half miles wide," said Laramie County
                  Fire District 1 Assistant Fire Chief J.D. Steele.
                  No one was injured, but a shed and vacant trailer were
                  destroyed, he said.
                  The cause was ruled accidental.
                  "It looks like it may have been someone cleaning ashes out of a
                  chimney," Steele said. "They may have done that (Monday) night,
                  disposed them out back and when the wind kicked up, it rekindled
                  them a little bit."
                  The blaze, which blackened private and state land, crossed into
                  Colorado by late afternoon.
                  Winds of 30-35 mph with gusts over 50 mph and hilly terrain
                  hampered containment efforts. The fire broke out shortly before 2
                  p.m. and was contained about 7:30 p.m.
                  The fire was near a wind farm but moved away from the turbines,
                  Steele said. Nearby cattle were herded from danger using
                  all-terrain vehicles.
                  About 50 firefighters from five county districts, F.E. Warren
                  Air Force Base, Wyoming National Guard and Nunn, Colo., answered
                  the call.
                  Laramie County graders helped carve out fire line, and a private
                  Cheyenne contractor provided water tender support, Steele said.
                  The fire was south of Chalk Bluffs Road near Rosetta Road.

                  (Copyright 2004 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    April 15th

                    FORT WASHAKIE, Wyo. (AP) - A large wildfire bore down on this
                    town of 250 on the Wind River Indian Reservation on Sunday, burning
                    a vacant building and prompting a full evacuation.
                    No injuries were reported.
                    The fire was at least five miles long along the banks of the
                    Little Wind River, according to R.J. Shakespeare, chief medical
                    officer with the Fort Washakie Fire Department.
                    "It's right on the inside of town," he said.
                    The burned building was the former Bureau of Indian Affairs
                    headquarters for the reservation, which has been vacant for several
                    years. Other buildings in the BIA compound on the edge of town were
                    unscathed, but much of the north end of town was shrouded in smoke.
                    All roads into Fort Washakie were closed, including U.S. 287.
                    The fire went under the U.S. 287 bridge at the river, according to
                    a witness, Ernie Over, of Lander.
                    Ivan Posey, chairman of the Eastern Shoshone Tribe, said the
                    flames were being fueled by thick vegetation in the river bottom
                    and 25-mph wind gusting to 35 mph.
                    "There's some old cottonwood trees, so I think some of that is
                    pretty dry tinder," he said. "There's a lot of brush down there -
                    a lot of brush and a lot of dry grass."
                    The evacuees included residents of Morning Star Manor nursing
                    home, some of whom were wheeled out and put in ambulances and other
                    vehicles, according to Over.
                    Evacuees were being taken in shuttle buses to a Red Cross
                    shelter at Wind River High School in Ethete, about eight miles east
                    of Fort Washakie. An ambulance was also standing by at the school.
                    Fire units responded from all over Fremont County, including
                    Riverton and Lander, and a command center was set up at the Fort
                    Washakie Fire Department.

                    (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      July 21st

                      Fire breaks out in beetle-killed area near Yellowstone

                      CODY, Wyo. (AP) - A wildfire has broken out near a lodge amid
                      numerous dead trees east of Yellowstone National Park.
                      Firefighters expect to get the five-acre fire under control
                      sometime today (Thursday).
                      The area along the North Fork of the Shoshone River has worried
                      firefighters because of the potential for vast numbers of
                      beetle-killed trees to fuel a severe wildfire.
                      But forest spokesman Gordon Warren says a new tree-thinning
                      program in the beetle-killed areas is helping firefighters keep
                      today's fire under control.
                      A five-acre fire is also burning northwest of the West Thumb of
                      Yellowstone Lake in Yellowstone National Park. But that fire is
                      being allowed to burn for forest management reasons.
                      Drying grass has meanwhile prompted the Bureau of Land
                      Management to enact fire restrictions on B-L-M land in eight
                      eastern counties: Johnson, Sheridan, Crook, Weston, Converse,
                      Natrona, Goshen and Platte.


                      (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        July 25th

                        MOSKEE, Wyo. (AP) - Evacuated residents returned to their homes
                        near this northeast Wyoming town, and fire crews were hopeful that
                        cooler, wet weather Monday would help them make progress on a group
                        of wildfires that had burned about 2,500 acres near the
                        Wyoming-South Dakota line.
                        Information officer Brenda Bowen said the group of five fires
                        was 10 percent contained. Most of the fires were only a few acres
                        in size and completely lined, Bowen said, though one, the Cement
                        fire, near Moskee, remained a concern. More than 240 personnel were
                        fighting the fires early Monday, but the number was expected to
                        grow later in the day with the arrival of a special management
                        team, she said.
                        The Cement fire started on Black Hills National Forest land and
                        was burning through trees and heavy slash on steep terrain, she
                        said.
                        Residents of 11 homes evacuated voluntarily over the weekend had
                        returned by Monday, she said, and cooler weather and rain were
                        expected to aid firefighting efforts.
                        "They should be able to get in and access some of the area they
                        weren't able to before because of extreme fire concerns," Bowen
                        said.
                        Rain-slickened roads were a concern Monday, and fire crews were
                        mindful of the potential for gusty conditions and increased fire
                        activity, she said. Firefighters hoped to make progress on the fire
                        while the weather remained relatively cool and conditions more
                        favorable, she said. Temperatures were expected to return to the
                        90s by later in the week.
                        "So we'll work as quick as we can," Bowen said.
                        The fires in Crook County are the first to tap into a state and
                        local insurance account to help pay for the cost of fighting large
                        wildfires, according to the Wyoming State Forestry Division. The
                        account has $3.6 million.

                        (Copyright 2005 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          wyoming 2006

                          CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - Gov. Dave Freudenthal declared a state of
                          emergency Tuesday afternoon as winds pushed a fast-moving wildfire
                          toward hundreds of evacuated homes south of Casper.
                          The fire, first reported Monday morning, had burned about 7,000
                          acres by Tuesday evening with no containment, the governor's office
                          said.
                          Officials said winds were driving flames and had forced
                          firefighters to pull back in places Tuesday afternoon and
                          concentrate on structural protection.
                          "They've put some pretty big dozer lines around the radio
                          towers up there, and where they can around the subdivision. But the
                          problem is where the wind kicks up and starts spotting over the
                          lines," said State Forester Bill Crapser, who said there were
                          temperatures into the 90s and wind gusts of 27 mph Tuesday evening.
                          And, Crapser said, conditions weren't expected to improve
                          Wednesday.
                          "The weather report isn't favorable for tomorrow," he said.
                          "We have more air resources that we've been able to spring loose
                          from other fires coming in tomorrow."
                          The fire has burned on areas of Casper Mountain, about five
                          miles south of Casper - Wyoming's second-largest city, near the
                          center of the state.
                          Freudenthal said Tuesday afternoon that his office was pushing
                          to get more federal firefighting resources assigned to the fire.
                          "It's really more of everything," Freudenthal said, describing
                          what resources are needed. "And there's stuff moving, we've got
                          another helicopter coming. Unfortunately the whole country is a
                          little stretched, so we continue to push."
                          A top-level federal fire-management team from Utah was scheduled
                          to take over management of the firefighting operations Tuesday
                          afternoon.
                          "Part of the difficulty is the extensive amount of beetle-kill
                          (dead trees), and the extremely dry weather we've had,"
                          Freudenthal said.
                          Crapser said at about 3:30 p.m. that significant winds had come
                          up in the preceding hour.
                          "We've had to pull people off the line and put them in a
                          structural protection mode, where they're just trying to protect
                          houses in the vicinity," Crapser said.
                          "We're still calling for resources all around the country. With
                          the fire activity going on about the country, resources are hard to
                          come by," Crapser said. "It's not looking really good up there
                          right now."
                          Crapser said firefighters were pulled back from the line in
                          places because embers from the fire were blowing across fire lines
                          and creating spot fires behind firefighters.
                          Crapser estimated about 225 firefighters were on the fire, but
                          said he expected numbers to go up significantly as more crews are
                          pulled off of other fires elsewhere. He said local firefighters and
                          volunteer fire departments are using fire engines to try to protect
                          houses in the area.
                          Rick Young, spokesman for the Natrona County Fire Protection
                          District, said authorities on Tuesday morning had ordered the
                          evacuation of several subdivisions on Casper Mountain. He said they
                          hold hundreds of homes.
                          Residents were allowed in Monday to remove valuables from their
                          homes and cabins, but on Tuesday the area was closed completely. A
                          cabin, outbuilding and a private pickup truck have been reported
                          burned, but no injuries were reported.
                          "We have three that are in immediate danger, that we're not
                          sure are going to make it or not at this point," Young said of
                          homes in the area of the fire. "And there's no way to get in to
                          them."
                          Conditions had forced firefighters to pull back as much as 2
                          miles, Young said.
                          "Right now, things are not going well for us, the winds have
                          picked up," Young said. "Smoke's so bad, we're losing visuals."
                          Young said the fire was heading southeast, moving toward houses,
                          radio communication towers and a local ski area.
                          ---
                          On the Net:
                          Casper fire evacuation map:
                          http://www.casperwy.gov/documents/Au...cuationMap.pdf
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            August 16th

                            CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - More firefighters and equipment arrived
                            Wednesday in attempts to fend off a wildfire threatening hundreds
                            of houses near Casper.
                            "We haven't lost any homes, but it's real close," said State
                            Forester Bill Crapser.
                            The fire expanded rapidly in shifting winds and headed toward a
                            subdivision of about 50 homes, Crapser said.
                            The fire was burning on Casper Mountain, about five miles south
                            of Wyoming's second-largest city. The lightning-sparked blaze had
                            already burned nearly 10,000 acres, or 15 square miles, since
                            Monday. Gov. Dave Freudenthal declared a state of emergency
                            Tuesday.
                            A top-level federal fire management team took control Wednesday
                            morning.
                            An estimated 300 homes in the heavily forested area were ordered
                            evacuated Monday and Tuesday. More evacuation orders were likely,
                            Crapser said.
                            Officials at the National Interagency Fire Center in Boise,
                            Idaho, said all available equipment and crews are fully engaged on
                            more than 50 large wildfires across the West.
                            Idaho led the nation with 15 large wildfires Wednesday,
                            including several on the fringes of rural mountain communities.
                            The state Department of Environmental Quality issued what it
                            said was its first "red" air quality alert for the populous Boise
                            Valley after drifting smoke from wildfires sent ozone pollution to
                            unhealthy levels.
                            Elsewhere, firefighters were battling a lightning-sparked
                            wildfire that had doubled in size to 40,000 acres, or 62 square
                            miles, in Elko County, Nev. Army troops were assigned to two fires
                            that have blackened more than 140 square miles in northern
                            Washington state.
                            Nationwide, more than 6.3 million acres have burned this year,
                            well above the 10-year average of less than 4 million acres burned
                            by this time of year, according to the NIFC.
                            "We're focusing on protecting community infrastructure,
                            historical resources and precious watersheds," said Rose Davis, a
                            Forest Service spokeswoman at the NIFC. "We need to look at where
                            we can be the most effective with what we have, knowing these fires
                            could keep burning for another month or so."
                            ---
                            On the Net:
                            National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              August 17th

                              CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) - Crews made progress on Thursday toward
                              controlling the wildfire that has forced the evacuation of hundreds
                              of homes this week south of Casper.
                              Bill Crapser, Wyoming state forester, said early Thursday
                              evening that the number of firefighters on the scene had steadily
                              increased this week to more than 400. He said weather forecasters
                              were calling for cooler conditions on Friday, which should help
                              suppression efforts.
                              "I guess we'll say we're guardedly optimistic," Crapser said.
                              "But nobody's willing to celebrate quite yet. The wind has done
                              enough strange things to us the last couple of days that we're not
                              quite ready to celebrate quite yet."
                              The fire grew to just over 11,000 acres - more than 17 square
                              miles - by Thursday evening, Crapser said. That's up from a
                              reported 10,000 acres that morning.
                              "We had a little bit of growth from the northeast corner this
                              afternoon," Crapser said, adding that winds during the day had
                              gusted up to 50 mph.
                              The fire was classified as 30 percent contained Thursday
                              morning, but Crapser said he expects that figure would rise to
                              about 50 percent containment when managers assessed the situation
                              Thursday evening.
                              Crews were able to keep the fire from burning any homes on
                              Thursday. Since the fire started on Monday, it has burned four
                              cabins, but no injuries have been reported. Crapser said about 400
                              homes have been evacuated.
                              The fire is burning on Casper Mountain about 5 miles south of
                              Casper, Wyoming's second-largest city near the center of the state.
                              Gov. Dave Freudenthal toured the fire Thursday morning. In a
                              telephone interview afterward, he credited firefighters with
                              stopping the fire as it made several runs toward developed areas
                              Wednesday night.
                              Freudenthal said he'd spoken with lawmakers about the cost of
                              the firefighting effort, and had their support to spend what it
                              takes to protect homes.
                              The Federal Emergency Management Agency pledged to help the
                              state cover three-quarters of the eligible portion of the cost.
                              Freudenthal said the costs at this point are unknown, but said they
                              would amount to several million dollars.
                              "When you bring in these big helicopters and some of these
                              fixed-wing aircraft, it's expensive," Freudenthal said.
                              Rick Young, spokesman for the Natrona County Fire Protection
                              District, said Thursday that engine teams from local fire
                              departments played a critical role in protecting houses from flames
                              in the thickly timbered subdivisions.
                              Young estimated that as many as 100 local firefighters from
                              departments including Casper, Mills and Bar Nunn, were working in
                              shifts around the clock.
                              "It's vital, just with the shortage of resources across the
                              United States," Young said of the support from the local engine
                              crews. "We rely on them so much. It's absolutely incredible, the
                              support we've been getting from them."

                              (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                August 24th

                                KAYCEE, Wyo. (AP) - A wildfire was burning in an area near where
                                famed outlaws Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid used to hide out.
                                The fire had burned about 12,000 acres in the rugged area of the
                                Hole-in-the-Wall, about 20 miles southwest of Kaycee.
                                The fire was started by lightning on Tuesday, according to Diane
                                Martin, with the Casper Interagency Fire Dispatch.
                                Firefighters had no containment as of Thursday afternoon, Martin
                                said.
                                In the 1890s, Cassidy and his band of outlaws made use of the
                                Hole-in-the-Wall area as a hideout after robbing banks and trains.
                                One of the names for the group was the "Hole-in-the-Wall Gang."

                                (Copyright 2006 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                                Comment

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