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  • Wyoming wildfires

    JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) - A series of violent thunderstorms sparked
    four small wildfires that firefighters were scrambling Monday to
    put out.
    Fire crews opted to fight three of the blazes - which started in
    or near the Gros Ventre Wilderness Area - because of the
    uncertainty of the upcoming fire season, said Rod Dykehouse, forest
    fire management officer for the Bridger-Teton National Forest.
    Crews were still determining Monday whether to let one of the
    fires burn as a wildland management tool, forest spokeswoman Mary
    Lendman said.
    The Teepee fire, between Teepee and Goosewing creeks south of
    the Gros Ventre River, started Friday and burned about just over an
    acre before it was fully contained Monday, Lendman said.
    "They're letting the inside burn itself out," she said.
    Dykehouse said the fire displayed some unusual behavior.
    "It was consuming the small logs pretty good - what we call the
    100-hour fuels," he said. "It was a little surprising for this
    time of year."
    U.S. Forest Service firefighters quickly controlled two more
    fires discovered Saturday near Sam Peak and on Crystal Butte above
    Jackson.
    Crews on Monday were still determining what to do with the Two
    Echo fire, also in the Gros Ventre Wilderness. That blaze had been
    difficult to locate, occasionally sending up puffs of smoke,
    Dykehouse said.
    "They're still doing some analysis and will be determining
    whether they're going to let it go or if suppression is
    warranted," Lendman said.
    Officials did not know the size of that blaze.
    Fire managers said they aren't certain how this year's summer
    fire season will unfold. Some blazes have the potential to burn for
    a long time. Should the year be dry, that could pose problems,
    Dykehouse said.
    "We're not sure how the season's going to shape up," he said.
    "Even with a wet spring, we're still coming out of three to four
    years of drought. A lot of the moisture is getting absorbed in the
    soil. Things are drying out pretty fast out there."
    This weekend's wildfires were started by two major thunderstorms
    that swept over the valley Friday afternoon, the first bringing
    winds up to 60 mph. Marble-sized hail and heavy rain were also
    reported.
    "We had quite a bit of lightning move through the area,"
    Dykehouse said.
    -----
    On the Net:
    Bridger-Teton National Forest: http://www.fs.fed.us/btnf/
    National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov/
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

  • #2
    Story, Wyoming

    STORY, Wyo. (AP) - Trees and brush have begun to be cleared to
    shield this woodsy town from a potentially catastrophic wildfire.
    Bighorn National Forest crews have begun felling small trees and
    removing material under large pines and firs in a 600-acre area
    just west of town, according to Tongue River District Ranger Craig
    Yancey.
    A related project is a 2-mile-long fire break on private land
    next to the forest. The work on that project will begin when the
    ground dries up, according to John Lunbeck, a Story Fire District
    board member.
    "It's been an awfully wet spring and we're still waiting to dry
    out up here," he said.
    Lunbeck is coordinator of the Story Wildfire Assessment and
    Mitigation Plan, or SWAMP.
    The fire district has received $135,000 in federal grants to
    thin trees and understory in a 300-foot-wide section along the
    forest boundary.
    Lunbeck said four private landowners have agreed to have trees
    cleared from their property and negotiations are continuing with
    four others.
    He said Story, located next to the national forest, has about
    600 homes. He estimated that 30-40 percent of homeowners have taken
    steps to protect their homes against wildfires.

    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

    Comment


    • #3
      High Risk

      High fire danger forecast for parts of Wyoming

      (Cheyenne-AP) -- A new report shows southwestern Wyoming and the
      Big Horn Basin are at the greatest risk for wildfires in the state
      this year.
      But the National Interagency Fire Center says that danger will
      likely shift entirely to the western half of Wyoming later this
      summer. The report forecast wildfire danger between June and
      September.
      Forecasters say southwestern Wyoming and the Big Horn Basin are
      much drier than other areas and, therefore, are at greater fire
      danger.
      Western Wyoming, however, is expected to become more susceptible
      to wildfires later this summer. That's when experts say grass fed
      by this spring's abundant moisture could dry to tinder.
      Wyoming has fared better than other states so far this wildfire
      season. Large fires have already charred thousands of acres in
      Alaska, Arizona, New Mexico and other states.
      Just 126 acres have burned in Wyoming so far this year. That
      compares to more than 14 thousand acres burned by the Hensel fire
      in June 2002.

      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

      Comment


      • #4
        Human-caused fires on the rise
        scho
        JACKSON, Wyo. (AP) - With fire danger rising across the West,
        officials in the Bridger-Teton National Forest on Thursday reported
        an increasing number of wildfires caused by fireworks and abandoned
        campfires.
        Since April, people have caused 46 fires in the forest and a
        bordering area in eastern Idaho, forest supervisor Kniffy Hamilton
        said.
        "A total of 15 abandoned campfires, three of which were outside
        the ring, were found on the Bridger-Teton National Forest over the
        Fourth of July weekend," he said.
        The campfires, rangers said, could have been potentially
        disastrous.
        Officials have also seen an increasing number of fires started
        with fireworks, which are illegal on public lands. Violators can
        face fines and even prison time.
        "The danger of wildfires at this time of year is very high, and
        sparks from even a small type of firework could start a major
        wildfire," said Kevin Conran, a fire mitigation and education
        specialist with the Caribou-Targhee National Forest in Idaho.
        Bridger-Teton employees and the Eastern Idaho Interagency Fire
        Center were visiting campsites throughout the area to teach
        visitors how to responsibly tend campfires.
        Such fires should be built in a safe spot, not left unattended
        and be cold to the touch before leaving the area, fire management
        officer Rod Dykehouse said.
        Campers should always keep a bucket of water and shovel nearby.


        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

        Comment


        • #5
          July 14th

          By The Associated Press
          After a wet spring and a delayed start, wildfire season finally
          reared its ugly head in Wyoming on Monday as a pair of fires closed
          roads in the southern and western parts of the state.
          Around 4:20 p.m. Monday, a fire southwest of Woods Hole forced
          officials to close Wyoming 230 south to the Colorado line and
          Colorado 127 south to Colorado 125, a distance of about 25 miles.
          "I understand that most of the fire, if not all of it, is on
          the east or south side of the highway," Becky Rine, spokeswoman
          for Medicine Bow National Forest, said Monday night.
          She said the fire was reported around 1 p.m. and a
          reconnaissance plane was dispatched to determine the fire's size.
          A tanker plane and a helicopter were meanwhile sent to back up
          several crews of firefighters on the ground. "We had extremely
          well-trained crews - out of Laramie, in fact - who were on it
          immediately," she said.
          Laramie is about 30 miles northeast of the fire.
          In Snake River Canyon in western Wyoming, firefighters continued
          battling a 2,540-acre fire that began over the weekend. Althouth
          the fire more than doubled in size Monday, clearing smoke enabled
          the Wyoming Department of Transportation to reopen U.S. 26-89
          between Alpine and Hoback Junction after closing the highway
          starting Saturday.
          The 23-mile section of highway is heavily traveled by tourists
          and by people who live in Alpine and work in Jackson. About 8,000
          vehicles a day travel the road in the summer.
          "We're in good shape now in terms of visibility," said Richard
          Paulson, spokesman for the Transportation Department.
          Smoke from the East Table fire, located about 23 miles south of
          Jackson, could be seen from several of the area's small towns.
          "It's a nasty little fire," said Wade Grant, a volunteer
          firefighter. "When it gets torching, it just roars like a jet."
          The fire was 10 percent contained. About 330 personnel were on
          the scene, including 13 crews of 20 firefighters each, according to
          Bridger-Teton National Forest spokesman Jay Anderson.
          "We had pretty moderate fire growth today - our conditions
          weren't nearly as bad as yesterday," Anderson said.
          Afternoon winds pushed embers up to a quarter-mile ahead of the
          fire.
          The fire forced officials to close three Bridger-Teton National
          Forest campgrounds and suspend fishing and rafting on the stretch
          of the Snake River between Hoback Junction and Alpine because of
          smoke.
          Ralph Boyack, of Anthony, Idaho, said he and his group barely
          managed to grab their stuff from East Table campground on Saturday
          after completing their float trip.
          "It was pretty crazy," Boyack said. "While we were waiting to
          be allowed through 1/8to the campground 3/8 we watched as some of those
          trees would just burst up into flames all the way to the top."
          The fire was not threatening any structures, visitor services or
          recreation opportunities in Jackson Hole or Grand Teton and
          Yellowstone national parks to the north.

          ----
          On the Net: http://www.tetonfires.com

          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

          Comment


          • #6
            July 17th

            Wildfires were burning on more than 6,100 acres in Wyoming on
            Thursday. Some of the major blazes:

            East Table Fire
            Started: July 12.
            Location: 23 miles south of Jackson.
            Size: 3,400 acres.
            Containment: 30 percent.
            Damage: None.
            On Scene: 330 fire personnel, six helicopters and one engine.
            Cause: Unintentional by humans.
            -----
            Gramm Fire
            Started: July 14.
            Location: 35 miles southwest of Laramie.
            Size: 729 acres.
            Containment: 30 percent.
            Damage: None.
            On Scene: 135 fire personnel with another 40 ordered, and two
            helicopters.
            Cause: Under investigation.
            -----
            Deep Lake Fire
            Started: July 16.
            Location: 30 miles northwest of Cody.
            Size: 1,000 acres.
            Containment: None.
            Damage: None.
            On Scene: One helicopter, seven engines. Another helicopter on
            order.
            Cause: Lightning.
            -----
            Douglas Fire
            Started: July 16.
            Location: 20 miles southwest of Sundance.
            Size: 800 acres.
            Containment: Unknown.
            Damage: None.
            On Scene: Six fire departments.
            Cause: Lightning.
            -----
            Otter Fire
            Started: July 15.
            Location: 20 miles northwest of Kaycee.
            Size: 100 acres.
            Containment: None reported. Full containment expected Friday.
            Damage: None.
            On Scene: 80 fire personnel, two engines ordered.
            Cause: Lightning.
            ----
            Six Mile Fire
            Started: July 16.
            Location: Near the Platte River Wilderness Area.
            Size: 40 acres.
            Containment: None.
            Damage: None.
            On Scene: 20 fire personnel, with two more crews ordered.
            Cause: Lightning.
            ----
            Amethyst Fire
            Started: July 15.
            Location: Near Amethyst Mountain east of the Grand Canyon of the
            Yellowstone in Yellowstone National Park.
            Size: 75 acres.
            Containment: None.
            Damage: None.
            On Scene: 20 fire personnel and one helicopter.
            Cause: Lightning.

            (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

            Comment


            • #7
              July 17th

              By SARAH COOKE
              Associated Press Writer
              A Boy Scout troop stranded by a swiftly moving wildfire near the
              Montana state line was rescued Thursday as firefighters continued
              to protect a small subdivision in southeastern Wyoming threatened
              by another blaze.

              The 15 Boy Scouts and their leaders were rescued from the
              Shoshone National Forest by a helicopter flown in to battle the
              blaze 35 miles northwest of Cody. The fire grew from 100 acres to
              1,000 acres overnight.
              The Scouts from Laramie were not in any danger but became
              stranded after authorities closed a trail near Deep Lake where they
              were camping, forest spokeswoman Susie Douglas said.
              "The fire is going away from their location," she said.
              Ignited by lightning Tuesday night, the Deep Lake fire was
              burning in dense timber and being driven by strong winds, producing
              a large cloud of smoke visible throughout the northern Big Horn
              Basin and southern Montana.
              It was about two miles from any structures, though seven engines
              conducted preliminary structure protection Thursday. Douglas did
              not know how many structures were in the fire's vicinity.

              In southeastern Wyoming, calmer winds helped 135 firefighters in
              their attempts to save 10 homes threatened by the Gramm fire in the
              Medicine Bow National Forest.
              The 729-acre fire had crept within 400 yards of the homes, which
              were evacuated Monday, but bulldozers had dug a line around the
              community southwest of Laramie and no structures had burned, forest
              spokeswoman Becky Rine said.
              Another 100 homes within five miles of the blaze were on standby
              to evacuate but were not considered immediately threatened, she
              said.
              Miller Lake campground and a public post and pole harvesting
              area, where the fire started, were closed Thursday for public
              safety reasons.
              "The good news is that winds are predicted to be light today,
              which is a good thing," Rine said. "However, the high
              temperatures are going to make things dicey."
              The fire was 30 percent contained.
              A new fire erupted 11 miles west of the Gramm fire near the
              Platte River Wilderness Area, and had burned 40 acres by late
              afternoon. No structures were threatened, and 20 firefighters were
              battling the lightning-caused blaze known as the Six Mile fire,
              which started Wednesday, Rine said.
              Firefighters in western Wyoming continued to dig lines around
              the 3,400-acre East Table fire that started Saturday about 23 miles
              south of Jackson. The fire was 30 percent contained, and crews
              expected full containment by Sunday, fire information officer Tina
              Boehle said.
              The fire, being fought by 330 firefighters, was not threatening
              any structures, visitor services or recreation opportunities in
              Jackson Hole or Grand Teton and Yellowstone national parks to the
              north.
              The Snake River was reopened to recreational use Wednesday after
              three days of closure, but Bailey Lake and several area trails
              remained off limits to the public, Boehle said.
              The fire was caused unintentionally by humans.
              Three wildfires totaling 75 acres were burning in Yellowstone
              National Park, but officials had closed only the Specimen Ridge
              Trail on the park's northeast side to the public, park spokeswoman
              Cheryl Matthews said. The rest of the park remained open.
              One of the fires was being allowed to burn, and another had been
              fully contained by Wednesday at less than one acre, Matthews said.
              Due to the high fire danger, Superintendent Suzanne Lewis on
              Thursday banned smoking and backcountry campfires in the park until
              further notice. Campfires confined to fire rings were still allowed
              in developed areas.
              A 100-acre fire sparked by lightning was burning in the Big Horn
              Mountains about 20 miles northwest of Kaycee. No structures were
              threatened and crews hoped to contain it by Friday, weather
              permitting, said Steve Haines, chief of the Powder River Fire
              District.
              "There's a lot of thick timber so it's real dangerous to put
              people in there to work right now," he said.

              ----
              On the Net:
              National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

              (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

              Comment


              • #8
                7/20

                By MEAD GRUVER
                Associated Press Writer
                More firefighters arrived at a wildfire as it blackened more of
                the heavily forested, rugged backcountry northwest of Cody.
                Winds gusting to 20 mph fanned the Deep Lake fire to 6,000 acres
                Sunday, an increase of about 500 acres from the day before. Flames
                crossed a fire line on the northeast edge of the fire but were
                pushed back.
                The Southern California Team 2 took over management of the fire
                Sunday. Meanwhile, one federal Type II hand crew from Minnesota
                arrived, joining a Type II crew from Pennsylvania that arrived
                Saturday.
                A total of about 75 firefighters were on the scene.
                "We're glad to be here, we're here to help, we're looking
                forward to working with the communities in the area," said Ralph
                Domanski, incident commander for the new management team.
                Outgoing Incident Commander Russ Wenke told firefighters to be
                careful where the fire had pushed onto grass and sagebrush slopes
                and where flames can react to the wind and spread quickly.
                One firefighter suffered a twisted knee Saturday - the only
                injury at the fire so far.
                Two helicopters were dropping water on the fire's southern and
                northern flanks. A larger helicopter that was requested arrived and
                put to work getting firefighters and equipment into the
                backcountry.
                The fire was 8 percent contained.
                Continued hot, dry weather were complicating firefighters'
                efforts at the Deep Lake fire and the East Table fire 23 miles
                south of Jackson.
                Firefighters were gradually getting the upper hand on the East
                Table fire. Since Saturday, the fire had not grown beyond 3,595
                acres and containment was up slightly to 65 percent.
                Full containment was predicted for Tuesday and the fire was
                expected to be completely under control by July 30.
                "The fire is looking better than we expected in some areas.
                We're a day ahead of where we expected to be," said field
                operations supervisor Rex Miller.
                Smoke continued to be visible along the Snake River. Motorists
                in Snake River Canyon were urged to use caution due to the smoke
                and helicopter operations.
                "We're very concerned that people will be distracted by all the
                activity in the area. Please slow down and pay attention to the
                other guys out there," safety officer Mose Shrum said.
                Much of the uncontained section of the fire was in very steep
                terrain with thick vegetation.
                Firefighters on a pair of wildfires southwest of Laramie got a
                little help from rain Saturday night and Sunday. By day's end they
                hoped to have the 760-acre Gramm fire 60 percent contained and the
                200-acre Six Mile fire 30 percent contained.
                Most of the rain fell on the Gramm fire.
                "Right now we're getting another major rain cell over the top
                of it - We got one about an hour ago," fire information officer
                Dave Slepnikoff said Sunday afternoon.
                Some of the 179 firefighters on the Gramm fire were being moved
                to the Six Mile fire just east of the North Platte Wilderness.
                Full containment of the Gramm fire was expected Monday or
                Tuesday and the Six Mile fire was expected to be completely
                contained Wednesday.
                "It all depends on the weather. If we keep getting rain it
                could be earlier and if we get more hot, dry weather it could be
                later," Slepnikoff said.
                The only major new fire in Wyoming was near Edgerton, about 70
                miles north of Casper. The Pine Ridge fire had burned more than 800
                acres.
                A sheriff's dispatcher said she had not heard of anyone being
                sent to the area Sunday.
                Six wildfires were burning in Yellowstone National Park. All
                were small except the 298-acre Amethyst fire, which has prompted
                officials to close the Specimen Ridge trail in the northeast part
                of the park.
                The fire was 40 percent contained Sunday.

                (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                Comment


                • #9
                  7/21

                  By The Associated Press
                  Gusty winds Monday were expected to test fire lines built by
                  firefighters who made good progress in trying to contain two fires
                  burning in the Medicine Bow National Forest in southeast Wyoming.
                  Elsewhere in the state, firefighters made progress against fires
                  burning northwest of Cody and south of Jackson.
                  The Gramm fire southwest of Laramie was 70 percent contained,
                  while the nearby Six Mile fire is 60 percent contained.
                  However, fire spokesman David Slepnikoff said winds gusting up
                  to 25 mph were projected to develop Monday afternoon.
                  "If we get through this pretty good ... I think we'll be
                  rolling on," Slepnikoff said.
                  If the lines hold, some of the 180 firefighters on the Gramm
                  fire and 130 at the Six Mile fire should be able to begin leaving
                  Tuesday, he said.
                  In that case, containment of the Gramm fire is predicted for
                  Wednesday while containment of the Six Mile fire is expected
                  Thursday.
                  The U.S. Forest Service did impose fire restrictions in the
                  Medicine Bow-Routt national forests and the Thunder Basin National
                  Grassland. No open fires are allowed outside fire grates in
                  developed campgrounds. Stoves and grills are permitted.
                  The Deep Lake fire northwest of Cody that has burned 5,985 acres
                  was 15 percent contained Monday morning - up from 8 percent on
                  Sunday.
                  The fire is moving toward grass and sage brush where
                  firefighters can better manage the fire, said fire information
                  officer Jeff Wenger.
                  "Overnight, it pretty much stayed in check, which allowed us to
                  tie in some lines," Wenger said.
                  There 126 people working the fire.
                  The East Table fire 23 miles southwest of Jackson was 75 percent
                  contained Monday, and firefighters were working to build the last
                  two miles of a fire line around it. Containment was expected
                  Tuesday.ΒΌ
                  "Presently, our greatest concern is firefighter fatigue. ...
                  Many of our firefighters have been out on the line for a week
                  now," said incident commander Paul Broyles.
                  The fire has burned 3,595 acres, and a few backcountry areas in
                  the Bridger-Teton National Forest in the immediate vicinity of the
                  fire remained closed.
                  The Yellowstone fires have resulted in the closure of one trail
                  in the northeast part of the park. Otherwise the Yellowstone fires
                  are small and in remote areas and have not affected any of the
                  park's services or tourist areas.
                  No structures have been lost in any of the Wyoming fires.

                  (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                  Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                  Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                  *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                  On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Two wildfires in northern Wyoming kept firefighters busy Tuesday
                    while crews on three other fires in the western and southern parts
                    of the state were reassigned elsewhere after the blazes were
                    contained.
                    The Big Spring fire on Bureau of Land Management land in Johnson
                    County nearly doubled in size to 1,300 acres, fire information
                    officer Lesley Collins said.
                    The fire, which was only 10 percent contained, was being battled
                    by a helicopter and 193 personnel, with more on the way.
                    "By the end of today there will be 250 people," Collins said.
                    On Tuesday, firefighters worked to shore up lines on the north
                    side of the fire and to protect six homes about a mile from the
                    fire and three ranches in a canyon about a half mile away.
                    The fire was burning in heavy stands of pine and pinyon juniper.
                    Full containment was expected by Aug. 1.
                    At the Deep Lake fire near the Montana state line, firefighters
                    improved containment to 22 percent even though "fire behavior was
                    very erratic and intense at times" on Monday, said fire spokesman
                    Gordon Warren.
                    The fire grew slightly to 6,020 acres.
                    On Tuesday, firefighters were working to build lines along the
                    northern boundary of the fire, Warren said.
                    No structures were threatened.
                    Crews were pulled off the lines at two fires in the Medicine Bow
                    National Forest southwest of Laramie and at a fire in the
                    Bridger-Teton National Forest south of Jackson.
                    Some firefighters remained at the fires to put out any remaining
                    hot spots and rehabilitate fire lines and burned areas.
                    In the Medicine Bow forest, crews contained the 759-acre Gramm
                    fire ahead of schedule Tuesday night after containing the 200-acre
                    Six Mile fire Monday, fire spokeswoman Becky Rine said.
                    Lines around both fires survived gusty winds Tuesday, though a
                    few flare-ups occurred inside them. Officials reopened Pelton Creek
                    campground, but other closures in the area remained in effect.
                    "Even though the fires are 100 percent contained there will
                    still be crews on them probably through the weekend dealing with
                    interior hot spots and watching the lines," Rine said.
                    About 150 firefighters were pulled off the fire lines Tuesday
                    and sent elsewhere, leaving 190 personnel to battle the blazes.
                    Also Tuesday, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management imposed fire
                    restrictions in Sweetwater, Lincoln, Teton and Sublette counties.
                    Similar bans existed in the Medicine Bow-Routt and Bridger-Teton
                    national forests, the Thunder Basin National Grassland and Grand
                    Teton and Yellowstone national parks.
                    No open fires were allowed outside fire grates in developed
                    campgrounds under the bans. Stoves and closed grills were
                    permitted. Violators face up to six months in prison and $5,000 to
                    $10,000 in fines.
                    In western Wyoming, the East Table fire 23 miles south of
                    Jackson was fully contained Tuesday night after burning 3,595
                    acres, fire spokeswoman Barbara Bassler said.
                    It was expected to be fully extinguished by June 30, she said.
                    The fire has cost $2.8 million to date, while the Gramm fire
                    cost $1.5 million, the Amethyst fire in Yellowstone $450,000 and
                    the Deep Lake fire $300,000. Cost estimates were not available for
                    other blazes.
                    Several fires were burning in remote areas of Yellowstone
                    National Park. The largest fire was 308 acres at 50 percent
                    containment. The other fires were no more than three acres in size.
                    Major park services and attractions were not affected.
                    A 600-acre fire was also burning 16 miles southeast of Newcastle
                    in the Black Hills National Forest on the South Dakota side of the
                    state line.

                    (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                    Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                    Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                    *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                    On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      7/23

                      BUFFALO, Wyo. (AP) - Eight mountain homes were evacuated
                      Wednesday because of an encroaching wildfire just outside the
                      Bighorn National Forest in northern Wyoming.
                      The blaze had grown to 1,500 acres and was moving northwesterly
                      within a half-mile of the homes, U.S. Bureau of Land Management
                      spokeswoman Lesley Collins said.
                      "With the rough terrain and topography and lack of resources,
                      they're just having a hard time trying to contain it," she said.
                      As 47 major fires burn in 11 Western states, manpower and
                      equipment is spread thin.
                      About 250 firefighters were battling the Big Spring fire that
                      started from lightning Saturday about 20 miles southwest of Buffalo
                      and was torching pinyon, ponderosa pine and juniper.
                      A federal firefighting team arrived Wednesday and was expected
                      to take over management Thursday, Collins said. The fire was 30
                      percent contained.
                      Temperatures were in the 90s and relative humidities in the
                      teens, making the task for firefighters even more challenging.
                      The homes that were evacuated are in the Mountain Top Estates on
                      Billy Creek Road between Billy Creek and Poison Creek, about 10
                      miles due west of Interstate 25.
                      "They're not big homes where people live all the time," said
                      Alice Cash, an employee of the Johnson County assessor's office.
                      "They're all seasonal homes. There's no permanent residences up
                      there."
                      Other homes lie to the south of the fire, but crews believe they
                      were fairly well protected by a strong fire line, Collins said.
                      Two helicopters were dropping water and two air tankers were
                      showering the fire with retardant.
                      Also in Johnson County, a new fire broke out about seven miles
                      south of Story in the Ditch Creek area, measuring 50 acres.
                      Elsewhere, the Deep Lake fire 30 miles northwest of Cody was
                      burning in rugged, steep terrain. It had charred more than 6,000
                      acres and was 22 percent contained.
                      Firefighters were trying to keep the fire from making a run down
                      a steep slope toward a few ranches and homes.
                      In Yellowstone National Park, a lightning-caused fire in the
                      northeast part of the park was 90 percent contained after burning
                      315 acres. No structures were threatened in the park.
                      None of the fires in Wyoming has had a significant impact on
                      tourism locations or activities, and all major roads and state and
                      national parks are open, a state tourism official said Wednesday.
                      "Fire activity has been about normal with only small, localized
                      activity mostly in more remote or off-the-beaten path areas with
                      little or no impact on tourism activities or parks," Diane Shober,
                      director of Wyoming Travel and Tourism, said. "Wyoming is such a
                      large state most visitors are probably not aware of any fire
                      activity."
                      The travel division has added a link to its Web site to provide
                      travelers with current fire information.

                      ----
                      On the Net:
                      Wyoming Tourism: http://www.wyomingtourism.org
                      National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov

                      (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                      Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                      Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                      *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                      On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        July 24th

                        100-degree weather heats up Big Spring fire

                        (Buffalo-AP) -- Gusty winds and hot temperatures are adding to
                        the difficulty of containing wildfire in the the Big Horn Mountains
                        that's now grown by about 600 acres.
                        The Big Spring fire was started by lightning Saturday. Crews
                        have contained about 45 percent of the fire, which grew to about
                        26-hundred acres.
                        Some 400 firefighters are on the scene, trying to keep the blaze
                        from reaching dozens of homes at the top of a canyon.
                        Johnson County Sheriff Stephen Kozisek (KOH'-zih-check) says the
                        homes have been evacuated and two roads into the area remain
                        closed, along with two adjacent Forest Service roads.
                        The sheriff says crews have lit backburns in Poison Creek and
                        Robinson canyons in hopes of eliminating volatile fuels -- and
                        slowing the fire's spread.
                        Another fire in Johnson County -- seven miles southwest of Story
                        in the Bighorn National Forest -- remained about 350 acres tonight
                        and is now ten percent contained.
                        About 29 firefighters are on scene. No structures are
                        threatened, but officials say the area contains heavy stands of
                        lodgepole pine and has the potential to grow significantly.
                        Elsewhere, the Deep Lake fire 30 miles northwest of Cody has
                        charred 65-hundred acres and is now 35 percent contained.
                        About 220 firefighters are on scene, and spokesman Jim Wilkins
                        says more are on the way. He says crews are fairly confident that
                        fire lines will hold on the eastern flank -- enough to protect
                        about four threatened ranch homes.
                        Wilkins says firefighters will remain in a defensive mode until
                        more help arrives.
                        The cause of the Deep Lake fire remains under investigation.
                        In the northeastern portion of Yellowstone National Park, a
                        lightning-caused fire is 90-percent contained after burning 315
                        acres. No structures are threatened or tourist facilities in the
                        park are threatened, although one backcountry trail is closed.

                        (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                        Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                        Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                        *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                        On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          7/27

                          Red Point fire rages southeast of Newcastle

                          (Newcastle-AP) -- Firefighters have been gaining the upper hand
                          on wildfires around Wyoming, except for one wildfire on the South
                          Dakota line southeast of Newcastle.
                          The Red Point fire swelled from 96-hundred acres from yesterday
                          to today (Sunday). Even so, firefighters say they've got the fire
                          40 percent contained and expect to havee it fully contained
                          Wednesday.
                          Three air tankers, four helicopters, eight bulldozers and 643
                          firefighters aree fighting the fire.
                          In the mountains northwest of Cody, firefighters are handing the
                          battle against the Deep Lake fire back to those who were the first
                          to fight it over a week ago.
                          Fire information officer Jim Wilkins says the six-thousand,
                          886-acre fire has burned down considerably and it's now 55 percent
                          contained.
                          About 20 miles southwest of Buffalo, firefighters have contained
                          80 percent of the 27-hundred-acre Big Spring fire. Roads in the
                          area are reopening and special protection is no longer needed for
                          11 cabins that were threatened earlier.
                          Likewise, containment of the 370-acre Ditch Creek fire five
                          miles outside Story has grown to 25 percent. Officials say the fire
                          has been active on its west side and two crews have been sent to
                          work there.

                          (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                          Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                          Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                          *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                          On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            7/28

                            NEWCASTLE, Wyo. (AP) - A fire on the edge of the Black Hills
                            grew by another 1,500 acres Monday as it burned grass and timber
                            southeast of Newcastle.
                            But fire officials were confident they were gaining the upper
                            hand on the 17,000-acre Red Point Fire, which was 60 percent
                            contained.
                            "It's finally starting to behave," fire information officer
                            Brenda Bowen said Monday evening.
                            A large concentration of people worked on the north end of the
                            fire, which had been the most active, and those efforts seemed to
                            be paying off she said. Successful burnouts were conducted Monday
                            to reduce fuels for the fire.
                            Nearly all of the blaze is in an unpopulated, remote area of
                            Custer County, S.D., on the western edge of the Black Hills
                            National Forest. A small portion of the fire has crossed into
                            Wyoming.
                            A voluntary evacuation of some homeowners on the South Dakota
                            side was lifted midmorning Monday.
                            In northwest Wyoming, a new fire broke out in the Snake River
                            Canyon about 15 miles south of Hoback Junction and two miles
                            northwest of the river's West Table boat ramp.
                            Forty-one firefighters were working the blaze, aided by two
                            helicopters making water drops, Bridger-Teton National Forest
                            officials said.
                            The Wolf Fire started about 6 p.m. Sunday. The cause was not
                            immediately determined.
                            "The fire danger for the Bridger-Teton is listed at very
                            high," Forest Supervisor Kniffy Hamilton said. "We have initiated
                            partial fire restrictions ... for the Forest as a result of the
                            weather and fuel moisture content."
                            The fire was burning sub-alpine fir and sending flaming embers
                            ahead, creating new fires ahead of the main blaze.
                            The blaze is near the site of the 3,595-acre East Table fire,
                            which started July 12 and was contained July 22.
                            Elsewhere, progress was made in containing several fires that
                            have been burning in the northern part of the state.
                            About 250 firefighters are making significant progress in
                            containing the Ditch Creek fire outside Story. The 370-acre fire
                            was 60 percent contained on Monday, up from 25 percent on Sunday,
                            and full containment was expected by Thursday. No structures are
                            threatened.
                            In the mountains northwest of Cody, the Deep Lake fire is 55
                            percent contained after burning 6,886 acres. Firefighters were
                            handing the battle back to those who were the first to fight it
                            over a week ago.
                            About 20 miles southwest of Buffalo, firefighters have contained
                            90 percent of the 2,700-acre Big Spring fire, where rain fell
                            Saturday and Sunday nights. Full containment was expected Tuesday.
                            Roads in the area were reopening and special protection was no
                            longer needed for 11 cabins that had been threatened.
                            On the Red Point fire, full containment is expected by late
                            Wednesday, Bowen said.
                            The number of people battling the fire rose to 877 and the cost
                            of fighting it to $2.1 million.
                            The fire, started July 21 by lightning, is the first large blaze
                            this season in the Black Hills.
                            No homes have been damaged; however, a historic cabin was
                            destroyed.

                            ----
                            On the Net: http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/blackhills

                            (Copyright 2003 by The Associated Press. All Rights Reserved.)
                            Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                            Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                            *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                            On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              7/29

                              By The Associated Press
                              Firefighters quickly pounced on a pair of new fires that broke
                              out in the Bridger-Teton National Forest of western Wyoming.
                              The Wolf fire, which started Sunday by lightning in Snake River
                              Canyon, was extinguished Tuesday and limited to just one acre. The
                              fire was near the site of the 3,595-acre East Table fire, which
                              started July 12 and was contained July 22.
                              A second fire that burned one-tenth of an acre at the border of
                              Grand Teton National Park and the Bridger-Teton National Forest was
                              also quickly contained.
                              Elsewhere, firefighters were tending to the remnants of several
                              fires that have been burning in the northern part of the state.
                              About 268 firefighters had 85 percent of the 370-acre Ditch
                              Creek fire outside Story contained, with full containment expected
                              Thursday. No structures are threatened from the fire, which has
                              cost $813,000 to fight.
                              "We're pretty confident that the containment lines will hold,
                              but there's always a watch out when there's a front coming in,"
                              information officer Bill Rice said.
                              The ravines forming the Ditch Creek and South Piney Creek
                              drainages are steep, rocky, full of dry vegetation and difficult to
                              hike into, he said.
                              Several roads and trails are closed near the fire, including the
                              area from Little Goose Campground south to the Middle Fork of Rock
                              Creek, and from the Bighorn National Forest boundary west to the
                              Cloud Peak Wilderness boundary.
                              The Deep Lake fire northwest of Cody was 55 percent contained
                              after burning 6,886 acres and would likely remain at that level
                              until rain or snow falls, said Rick Connell, acting fire management
                              officer.
                              "For most of the rest of the perimeter we don't expect it to do
                              much," Connell said. "There's very little part of the fire left
                              that will threaten the line in very serious fashion."
                              About 20 miles southwest of Buffalo, firefighters have contained
                              90 percent of the 2,700-acre Big Spring fire. Full containment was
                              expected Thursday. No structures are threatened by the fire, which
                              has cost more than $2 million to fight. About 142 personnel are on
                              scene.
                              A fire on the edge of the Black Hills National Forest grew by
                              500 acres Tuesday as it burned grass and timber southeast of
                              Newcastle, but the 17,500-acre Red Point Fire was 90 percent
                              contained, with full containment expected Wednesday.
                              More than 900 firefighters are working the blaze, which has cost
                              $2.8 million.
                              Nearly all of the blaze is in an unpopulated, remote area of
                              Custer County, S.D., on the western edge of the forest. A small
                              portion of the fire crossed into Wyoming.
                              North of Riverton, a grass fire damaged a bridge over Muddy
                              Creek on Bass Lake Road, creating a 30-mile-long detour to reach
                              recreation areas on the west side of Boysen State Park.
                              The wooden bridge, constructed more than 50 years ago, has been
                              closed to all traffic since Friday's fire, apparently started by
                              lightning.
                              "The big wooden timbers underneath have burns at least a
                              half-inch deep in them, and the deck was already weakened by dry
                              rot over the years," said Rocky McWilliams, a county roads
                              supervisor.
                              State officials announced fire restrictions would be imposed at
                              Glendo State Park effective Wednesday. Open fires will be banned,
                              along with charcoal fires in enclosed grills. Gas grills may be
                              used only for cooking purposes.
                              Guernsey, Curt Gowdy and Keyhole state parks have also imposed
                              restrictions.
                              In addition, fire restrictions are in effect in Yellowstone and
                              Grand Teton national parks, the Medicine Bow and Bridger-Teton
                              national forests, the Thunder Basin National Grassland, and Bureau
                              of Land Management property administered by the Kemmerer, Pinedale
                              and Rock Springs field offices.

                              ----
                              On the Net:
                              National Interagency Fire Center: http://www.nifc.gov
                              Proudly serving as the IACOJ Minister of Information & Propoganda!
                              Be Safe! Lookouts-Awareness-Communications-Escape Routes-Safety Zones

                              *Gathering Crust Since 1968*
                              On the web at www.section2wildfire.com

                              Comment

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