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  • Smokejumping and the structural world

    I know this may seem like it would be better in the wildland section, but as a career path from starting in wildland going into the structural world would spending time as a smokejumper be a good way to start and build a career from? or should one go strait to applying to a city department?

    Is wildland or smokejumping experience beneficial to an applicant to a city departement?

    Does anyone know anything about how to become a smokejumper?

    Does anyone have any other info about smokejumpers?

    Any incite would benefit me greatly as I am relatively new to fire fighting and would like to make a career out of it.

    Thank you for your time.

    (please no links to sites that I could easily get by typing smokejumper into google, I'm looking for personal knowledge of the subject)

    Edit: I'm thinking that I posted in the wrong section I believe this may be better in the career advancement section, I will re-post this in that area.
    Last edited by CasperC3; 09-07-2010, 08:50 PM.

  • #2
    I dunno that you mis posted it , But lets face it back east smokejumping means about as much to these folks as My 35 years In the fire service here in Connecticut would help me get a red card.. phhffft

    maybe in a department like LA county Sac city or at least regional Orange Cty FA where they have Forestry issues and resources I'd Love to be a Cat skinner in LA Cty, But have no wish to actually move out there..lol 30 years ago I'd have been on the fence like you well other way around something to be said for jumping outta a perfectly good airplane.. but its really brain damaged to jump out 200 miles from anywhere with a Handful of guys INTO a fire.. with hand tools..hahaha

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    • #3
      Experience in the wildland service and smoke jumping is always a plus...and a helluva lot of fun from what I hear, but its not necessarily going to make you the MOST employable candidate. If you do it, do it because its what you really feel like doing. DO NOT do it to make yourself a better structural candidate!

      Either way...Its all a blast...trust me!

      Paul
      PaulC
      FF/EMTP
      City of Las Vegas Fire & Rescue
      gethiredbyfire.com & The Fire Jobs App

      Comment


      • #4
        http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/people/smo...t/recruit.html
        Last edited by johnwemt; 11-22-2011, 06:31 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          If you want to be a smoke jumper go to

          http://www.fs.fed.us/fire/people/smo...t/recruit.html

          this is the site for requirments to be a smoke jumper.

          As is it would be benificial to have that experince for a structrual job.. It depends on teh agency your applying with. if you looking to work for Seattle fire I would think they could care less, But if your looking to get hired on in Montana it might make a diffrence on a resumee. But the biggest thing would be the quals you have on your red card when applying.

          Comment


          • #6
            How to become a smokejumper

            This is for the aspiring smokejumper who is new to fire.

            FIRST, FIGURE OUT WHERE EACH JUMP BASE IS LOCATED.

            SECOND, APPLY TO THE LOCAL FORESTS THAT SURROUND EACH BASE.

            Each base jumps their respective local forests each year. Research and apply to the districts that use smokejumpers. If you land a job on one of those districts, eventually you will get an initial attack fire, it might have smokejumpers on it.

            THIRD, MAKE CONTACTS WITH JUMPERS. MAKE THEM REMEMBER YOU.

            Don't be annoying. Be persistant. Trust me, there is a big difference. Apply after your first year. They wont hire you, but go in an introduce yourself to their rookie trainers. Meet the base manager. Apply every year. Be willing to drive to each base every winter if you have to.

            FOURTH, GET ON A HOTSHOT CREW, A GOOD ONE. GET ON A CREW THAT SENDS PEOPLE TO ROOKIE. ASK A BASE WHERE THEY WOULD RECOMMEND BECOMING A HOTSHOT.

            After a season or two, become a hotshot. Becoming a hotshot isnt easy, but it is the quickest way to jump. By this point you should be in great physical shape. How you perform on the hotshot crew will mean everything if you want to jump. Most rookie candidates are from hotshot crews, that come "highly" recommended and have been hotshots for 5, 6, 7 or more seasons.
            Don't limit all your energy and focus into one base. Talk to each one frequently. Some bases might not even have a rookie class that year. Last year missoula had all detailers. Meaning that each rookie was already a permanent employee with the USFS, and came and jumped for one year, then went back to his/her home unit.
            Each year is different when it comes to budget and how many people are returning. When there is no rookie class, the aspiring canidates now have to go back to their crew and wait till next year. Which means you have a lot of catching up to do in the experience department by this point, if you still want to jump. Every year where there is a qualified cadidate who cant get hired, sets you back a year as well.
            Good Luck!! I hope this helped
            Last edited by TPARKER021; 01-15-2011, 05:15 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              TPARKER021
              Forum Member


              Join Date: Jan 2011
              Posts: 1 This is what you do...

              --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              This is for the aspiring smokejumper who is new to fire.

              FIRST, FIGURE OUT WHERE EACH JUMP BASE IS LOCATED.

              SECOND, APPLY TO THE LOCAL FORESTS THAT SURROUND EACH BASE.

              Each base jumps their respective local forests each year. Research and apply to the districts that use smokejumpers. If you land a job on one of those districts, eventually you will get an initial attack fire, it might have smokejumpers on it.

              THIRD, MAKE CONTACTS WITH JUMPERS. MAKE THEM REMEMBER YOU.

              Don't be annoying. Be persistant. Trust me, there is a big difference. Apply after your first year. They wont hire you, but go in an introduce yourself to their rookie trainers. Meet the base manager. Apply every year. Be willing to drive to each base every winter if you have to.

              FOURTH, GET ON A HOTSHOT CREW, A GOOD ONE. GET ON A CREW THAT SENDS PEOPLE TO ROOKIE. ASK A BASE WHERE THEY WOULD RECOMMEND BECOMING A HOTSHOT.

              After a season or two, become a hotshot. Becoming a hotshot isnt easy, but it is the quickest way to jump. By this point you should be in great physical shape. How you perform on the hotshot crew will mean everything if you want to jump. Most rookie candidates are from hotshot crews, that come "highly" recommended and have been hotshots for 5, 6, 7 or more seasons.
              Don't limit all your energy and focus into one base. Talk to each one frequently. Some bases might not even have a rookie class that year. Last year missoula had all detailers. Meaning that each rookie was already a permanent employee with the USFS, and came and jumped for one year, then went back to his/her home unit.
              Each year is different when it comes to budget and how many people are returning. When there is no rookie class, the aspiring canidates now have to go back to their crew and wait till next year. Which means you have a lot of catching up to do in the experience department by this point, if you still want to jump. Every year where there is a qualified cadidate who cant get hired, sets you back a year as well.
              Good Luck!! I hope this helped

              Comment


              • #8
                TPARKER, thank you for the advice about how to become a jumper, I was wondering what your background in fire is? If you don’t mind me asking where did you get this information? Are you a jumper or have you ever been a jumper?

                SMOKEnpipes, I would be trying to get a job in Southern California.

                While I appreciate all the comments and advice on this thread, I believe the mods have moved this to the wildland section instead of deleting it, but since it is still alive I hope future posters will look at the version of this thread in the career advancement section. This other version has more specific information about my situation and myself.

                Thank You

                Comment


                • #9
                  TPARKER021 is right, sometimes people can get on with fewer years experience but not often. Getting on a hotshot crew and proving yourself that way is the best way to go. Depending on the year and the crew after a few seasons you might be allowed to detail with the jumpers to go to jump school and give it a try.
                  I worked for a federal widland crew for 3 years and a local fire department for 9 years, my brothers been on a shot crew for 4 years and a federal engine for another 5. The best thing you can do is find people that work where you want to and go talk to them.
                  "Hard work spotlights the character of people: some turn up their sleeves, some turn up their noses, and some don't turn up at all"

                  Comment

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