Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ake Ake, Kia Kaha

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ake Ake, Kia Kaha

    LONDON - The New Zealand Memorial in London was officially dedicated by the Queen yesterday in a bitterly cold Remembrance Day ceremony.

    About 2000 people - many of them expatriate New Zealanders - turned out for the autumn event at leafy Hyde Park Corner.

    The memorial comprises 16 sculpted bronze stands, which sit atop a grassy knoll at the busy intersection and carry many New Zealand motifs.

    The Queen, Prime Minister Helen Clark and British Prime Minister Tony Blair all spoke briefly in the 1-hour afternoon ceremony.

    The Queen described the memorial as "striking", adding that it honoured the two nations' heritage and long-standing loyalties to one another.

    It was also to remember those men and women of New Zealand and Britain who shared the hardships of war, and to honour those who had died, she said.

    "And to bear witness to the enduring strength of the relationship between Britain and New Zealand.

    "It therefore gives me great pleasure now to dedicate the New Zealand memorial."

    Both Helen Clark and Mr Blair paid tribute to the links - past, present and future - between the two countries, which hark back to the 18th century.

    Helen Clark said the memorial project had become a "vehicle through which to express in this ancient land of Britain, which with we have so many ties, the unique national identity of New Zealand".

    "It is a particular pleasure to do so through these beautiful and evocative bronze sculptures," she said, noting the many NZ themes they contained.

    "This place at Hyde Park Corner will be a place New Zealanders are proud to call home."

    The high-security memorial service started around 2.30pm with the arrival of guests.

    It had a strong military component. About 300 New Zealand Defence Force personnel, 32 veterans and various dignitaries attended the ceremony.

    Helen Clark with husband Professor Peter Davis, Mr Blair and wife Cherie, New Zealand veterans and the 120-strong tri-service NZDF royal honour guard arrived separately before 2.40pm.

    The guard was marched on by a tri-service band, playing Maori Battalion.

    They were followed by a string of royals, among them the Duke of Edinburgh, the Princess Royal, Prince Charles, the Duchess of Cornwall, Prince William, and the Duke of York. The Queen's motorcade arrived at 2.50pm.

    Black-clad security staff and anti-sniper units could be seen on the roofs of nearby buildings.

    After the three speeches to an audience studded with well-known New Zealanders, musician Dave Dobbyn performed a guitar solo of Welcome Home and later singer Hayley Westenra led the crowd in singing both nations' anthems.

    Wreaths were then laid at the foot of the memorial, while to its left fluttered the New Zealand flag, the Union Jack, and the Royal Standard.

    The first two were hung at half-mast when NZ's Chief of Defence, Lieutenant General Jerry Mateparae, and NZ Returned and Services Association president John Campbell cited the ode from For the Fallen, in Maori and English respectively.

    NZDF Maori performed a rousing version of Te Rauparaha's most famous haka - popularised by the All Blacks - in traditional warrior dress and carrying taiaha.

    Then the royal family, Helen Clark, Mr Blair and other important guests inspected the memorial, created by NZ sculptor Paul Dibble.

    At that time, the Queen told Helen Clark: "I'd love to come back and have a good look very close."

    Scores of expatriate New Zealanders were at the ceremony, all wrapped in winter woollies.

    Expats said the ceremony was "moving", "emotional", and something "to be proud of".

    Respected climber and Antarctic adventurer George Lowe, 83, said he regarded the event as a special one.

    He was part of Sir Edmund Hillary's team that conquered Mt Everest in 1953.

    "I'm amazed that New Zealand has only just got a memorial in London. It's about time."

    - NZPA


    UK Prime Minister Tony Blair also addressed the audience which included more than 300 members from the New Zealand Defence Force – the largest contingent of New Zealand armed forces to parade in the United Kingdom since World War II.

    The ceremony began with a 120 strong military march from Constitution Hill to Hyde Park Corner. The Royal Guard and band were accompanied by more than 60 New Zealand and UK veterans who fought in WWII, Japan, Korea and the Malayan emergency. They were flanked by the New Zealand Defence Maori culture group.

    Three Typhoons from RAF Base Conningby joined the Royal New Zealand Boeing 757 aircraft which had brought the defence contingent from New Zealand in a spectacular ‘fly past’ at 1000ft above Hyde Park.

    ----------

    From the Boer War (1898) to Borneo (late 1950) 255,000 Kiwis have served with Britains Military in wartime.

    New Zealand had the highest casualty rate per head of population in both world wars. Kiwis pilots were the third largest in number during the Battle of Britain.

    88,000 rest in their comrades hearts in foreign soil that is always a piece of New Zealand.

    Ake Ake, Kia Kaha.
    Forever and ever, Be Strong.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by FlyingKiwi; 11-12-2006, 03:54 PM.
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

  • #2
    They shall not grow old,
    As we that are left grow old:
    Age shall not weary them,
    Nor the years condemn,
    Attached Files
    Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
    Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

    Comment


    • #3
      At the going down of the sun
      And in the morning
      We will remember them
      Attached Files
      Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
      Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Always in our Hearts.
        Attached Files
        Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
        Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

        Comment


        • #5
          FOR THE FALLEN

          With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children
          England mourns for her dead across the sea,
          Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit,
          Fallen in the cause of the free.


          Solemn the drums thrill: Death august and royal
          Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres,
          There is music in the midst of desolation
          And glory that shines upon our tears.


          They went with songs to the battle, they were young,
          Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow,
          They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted,
          They fell with their faces to the foe.


          They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
          Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn
          At the going down of the sun and in the morning
          We will remember them.

          They mingle not with their laughing comrades again,
          They sit no more at familiar tables of home,
          They have no lot in our labour of the daytime,
          They sleep beyond England’s foam.


          But where our desires and hopes profound,
          Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight,
          To the innermost heart of their own land they are known
          As the stars are known to the night.


          As the stars shall be bright when we are dust,
          Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain,
          As the stars that are stary in the time of our darkness,
          To the end, to the end, they remain
          Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
          Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

          Comment


          • #6
            Very moving!

            That must've been quite a sight, Ian.

            Thank you for sharing it.




            Kevin
            Fire Lieutenant/E.M.T.
            IAFF Local 2339
            K of C 4th Degree
            "LEATHER FOREVER"
            Member I.A.C.O.J.
            http://www.tfdfire.com/
            "Fir na tine"

            Comment


            • #7
              I was up in London yesterday afternoon.... THe saturday before Rememberance Sunday is always great in London with the Lord Mayors show in the City and the Fireworks on the Thames in the Evening...then across in the West End there at the Royal Festival Hall there is the British Legion Festival of Rememberance.

              I have to say, memorial weekend is a good time to be in London...no one does Pomp and Ceremony like us.

              Kiwi, I drove around Hyde Park corner a couple of time last night, when I get the chance...(it is in the middle of a very, very busy fast moving roundabout) I will park up in Hyde Park and go take a look at it.

              Some of this Weekends stuff....

              BBC Link 1
              BBC Link 2
              BBC Link 3
              Steve Dude
              IACOJ member
              www.fireservice.co.uk

              London Fire Brigade...."Can Do"


              'Irony'... It's a British thing.

              Comment


              • #8
                This is my favourite story from this year's remembrances ...

                Pipes come home: Long-lost instrument a symbol of heroism
                View Larger Image

                Joshua MacDonald, pipe major in the Canadian Scottish Army Cadets, carries Victoria Cross recipient James Richardson's First World War bagpipes into the B.C. legislature yesterday. The ceremony ended 84 years of mystery about the instrument's whereabouts.

                Photograph by : Darren Stone, Times Colonist

                Jack Knox, Times Colonist
                Published: Thursday, November 09, 2006
                After the battle, the one in which Jimmy Richardson earned his Victoria Cross, the young soldier returned to the field to fetch his forgotten bagpipes -- and disappeared.

                So did the B.C. boy's pipes, lost in the mud of the First World War's Battle of the Somme.

                The whereabouts of the instrument was unknown for 84 years, until the curiosity of a man in Scotland led to the mystery being solved. Yesterday, the pipes finally found their way home, being mounted in the rotunda of the legislature.

                The story goes back to Oct. 8, 1916, when piper James Clelland Richardson's Canadian Scottish battalion was called on to attack the German-held Regina Trench near Courcelette, France. It was a bitter affair, the Canadians being mown down by machine-guns and artillery. At the lowest moment, with Richardson's company trapped by barbed wire and being butchered by withering fire, the 20-year-old drew himself up to his full five-feet-seven and began to play a piece believed to be Reel of Tulloch, a jaunty tune.

                "Piper Richardson strode up and down outside the wire, playing his pipes with the greatest coolness," read the citation for his Victoria Cross, the only one ever earned by a Canadian piper. "The effect was instantaneous. Inspired by his splendid example, the company rushed the wire with such fury and determination that the obstacle was overcome and the position captured."

                Later, after being detailed to bring a wounded comrade and some prisoners to the rear, Richardson realized he had forgotten his pipes, went to look for them, and never came back. His remains were eventually found and buried at Adanac Military Cemetery near Courcelette, but the pipes were gone.

                It turns out the bagpipes were discovered on the battlefield in February 1917 by British army chaplain Edward Bate, who later became a teacher at Ardvreck school at Crieff in Scotland.

                The pipes remained in a display case at the school until 2000, when an Ardvreck parent -- and piper -- grew curious about the instrument and its tartan, one that wasn't used by any British unit.

                An e-mail query from the parent reached Pipe Major Roger McGuire of the Canadian Scottish in Victoria, who recognized the Lennox tartan affixed to the pipes as being one used exclusively by pipers of the Seaforths, one of the four Canadian highland regiments that had been incorporated into the 16th Battalion, informally known as the Canadian Scottish. The mystery instrument was Richardson's.

                After 61/2 years of negotiation led by the Canadian Club, the bagpipes finally came home. Yesterday, with the pipe band of the Canadian Scottish playing Cabar Feidh, the regimental march of the Seaforths, and Blue Bonnets, the CanScots' own tune, Jimmy Richardson's broken bagpipes were carried up the legislature driveway by 16-year-old Joshua MacDonald, pipe major of his Victoria army cadet band.

                A letter from Richardson to his mother was read aloud by Jimmy's great-nephew, David Richardson of Brackendale, B.C. It spoke of muddy trenches, wet feet, a Christmas celebration enlivened by the pipes and Richardson's desire to one day come home and wed a good country lass: "I want a girl just like the girl who married dear old dad."

                That never happened, of course. The pipes Jimmy left back home in Chilliwack are now played by David's sister, Carol Wilkowski, one of several Richardson family members at yesterday's ceremony.

                "War is a place where men and women come face to face with fate and history, and all are changed, for better and for worse," Premier Gordon Campbell told a crowd liberally sprinkled with Canadian Scottish glengarries atop grey heads. "The strongest souls can be broken, the most unexpected of heroes can be born, and ordinary boys from towns like Chilliwack, British Columbia, can become the most extraordinary of men."

                It's hard to comprehend the butchery of the Somme, which the Canadian Club's Patrick Reid called "probably the bloodiest battle of all time." More than a million soldiers were killed or wounded. Such was the attrition that Richardson's Canadian Scottish, with an initial strength of 1,200, suffered 5,000 casualties over the course of the war, earning four Victoria Crosses, the most of any Canadian outfit.

                Who died and who was spared seemed a random thing. My grandfather, Jack Knox, joined the Seaforths and came home to B.C. unscathed.

                My other grandfather, Jack Home, had his right leg all but destroyed by a machine-gun bullet at Courcelette on Sept. 26, 1916, less than two weeks before Richardson died there. It was 14 months of hospitals in France and England before he was in good enough shape to ship home, albeit with what the family referred to as a game leg.

                Four years to the day after he was shot, his eldest child, my mother, was born. Jack Home got to live, got to marry his country lass, have a family. Years after the war, he would tell my mother how much the skirl of the bagpipes meant to the boys, how the sound -- Campbell called it "that uniquely mournful, uplifting and defiant voice" -- would put some spring in their step, some starch in their spines.

                Richardson was a hero at Courcelette. So was every terrified CanScot who rose up behind him. So were my grandfathers and every other ordinary Canadian soldier who, when tested, did extraordinary things.

                [email protected]

                * Tomorrow: As many as 10,000 pilots and aircrew trained at Pat Bay during the Second World War. As Remembrance Day approaches, T.W. Paterson recalls the estimated 141 who died here before ever reaching the war zones.

                * Saturday: The wartime contribution of Nanaimo's Pat Barron will never be forgotten in a small town in Luxembourg.
                Attached Files
                September 11th - Never Forget

                I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                Sheri
                IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                Honorary Flatlander

                RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                Comment


                • #9
                  No matter what country you call home ....

                  To all those who have given their lives for our freedom - thank you.

                  Your sacrifices will never be forgotten.

                  Rest in peace.

                  To those who have served in the past or are currently fighting for our freedom - thank you.
                  September 11th - Never Forget

                  I respect firefighters and emergency workers worldwide. Thank you for what you do.

                  Sheri
                  IACOJ CRUSTY CONVENTION CHAIR
                  Honorary Flatlander

                  RAY WAS HERE FIRST

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Thank you Ian and Sheri. I am somewhat familiar with the Richardson story, as he is honoured in the Calgary Museum of the Regiments, and his VC (replica) is part of a display at Canadian Forces Base Borden, School of Administration and Logistics.
                    --------

                    I just finally got my home computer up and running again, and this link was in my email from a FD friend of mine: (haven't seen a link in here regarding, but if there is, my apologies in advance.)

                    www.wtv-zone.com/Mary/THISWILLMAKEYOUPROUD.HTML

                    Remember............. ALWAYS.
                    Last edited by MalahatTwo7; 11-14-2006, 08:29 PM.
                    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

                    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

                    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

                    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

                    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

                    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The poem, High Flight, has over the years become a mantra to pilots.
                      It is reproduced here as a tribute to, and in memory of pilots of all generations.



                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                      High Flight
                      Oh! I have slipped the surly bonds of earth
                      And danced the skies on laughter-silvered wings;
                      Sunward I've climbed, and joined the tumbling mirth
                      Of sun-split clouds - and done a hundred things
                      You have not dreamed of - wheeled and soared and swung
                      High in the sunlit silence. Hov'ring there
                      I've chased the shouting wind along, and flung
                      My eager craft through footless halls of air.
                      Up, up the long delirious, burning blue,
                      I've topped the windswept heights with easy grace
                      Where never lark, or even eagle flew -
                      And, while with silent lifting mind I've trod
                      The high untresspassed sanctity of space,
                      Put out my hand and touched the face of God.

                      Pilot Officer Gillespie Magee
                      No 412 squadron, RCAF
                      Killed 11 December 1941


                      412 Squadron RCAF (today)

                      412 Squadron 1941
                      If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

                      "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

                      "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

                      Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

                      impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

                      IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

                      Comment

                      300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                      Collapse

                      Upper 300x250

                      Collapse

                      Taboola

                      Collapse

                      Leader

                      Collapse
                      Working...
                      X