Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Why do you do it

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Why do you do it

    Hello,
    My name is Tyler Dinkelaker and I am a senior at Wyoming High School, and a cadet on the Wyoming Fire Department in Ohio. One of the requirements

  • #2
    Originally posted by Dink9746
    Hello,
    My name is Tyler Dinkelaker and I am a senior at Wyoming High School, and a cadet on the Wyoming Fire Department in Ohio. One of the requirements
    (finishing the message)... is that we write an I-Search (research paper) on a question that we feel is a big part of our lives, or important to us. The question I came up with since it is not only important to me but also my family, for my two older brothers are firefighters, is why do people want to become firefighters (paid/ voulenteer)? SO if you don't mind me possibly quoting you in my paper, and have the time to share you personal story I would greatly appreciate it.

    -Tyler Dinkelaker

    Comment


    • #3
      What would you rather I do, sit in some flippin office when people need help?
      J
      It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by mcfd45
        What would you rather I do, sit in some flippin office when people need help?
        J
        Exactly.

        Hrmm alot of reasons to help people the brotherhood. Its like one big family. I mean honestly its the best job in the world. Sure we bitch about stuff but I think we all enjoy going to work and how many people do you know that can actually say they love going to work?
        Last edited by Tann3100; 10-18-2006, 01:06 AM.
        IACOJ
        FTM-PTB

        Comment


        • #5
          The station was over the back fence.
          Psychiatrists state 1 in 4 people has a mental illness.
          Look at three of your friends, if they are ok, your it.

          Comment


          • #6
            I fight fires because the little voices in my head tell me to.

            We all can say things like, helping our fellow citizens out, or it's the noble thing to do, family tradition, and the hundreds of other reasons. But for me it was tradition that first got me involved, my Dad was a volunteer and so was an Uncle. Then when I was in the 8th grade I read the book, "Report from Engine Co. 82" written by the founder of Firehouse magazine, Dennis Smith, and I knew then that was the job for me. Check it out I garentee you will not be able to put it down. While in High School a buddy of mine and I would follow the trucks and watch. We always made sure we did not get in the way. Then one day after graduation we decided to join the local volunteer department. He stayed on for something like 10 years or so but moved out of town and got into law enforcement. He is no longer in this world, rest his soul. Me, I am still with that department going on 26 years now. That vollie experiance got me into a carreer department where I now have 21 years. I do love the comaraderie, nothing like it around. My fellow firefighters that I have sweat with, hurt with, cried with, bled with and would die for are some of the most important people in my life. But most of all, forget about the romance, forget about the hero stuff, although it helps with the ladies at times, I love being first in on the line with flames pushing out the door, the hard work till your body can't take anymore, fighting the beast and winning more often than not and being the last one out. You hate seeing people loose everything when their house burns or get hurt in all sorts of manner. A little bit of you dies when someone dies, when you are called on to help, especially kids, even if there was no chance for them before you got the call, but you can't help but love the battle. During one long cold winter fire, we were there about 12 hours or so, a Chief asked how I was doing I replied, "I am freezing, I am hungry, my back is killing me, and I am tired, but God help me I do love it so."

            Would love to see what you end up writing so maybe when you get it done you can post it. Good luck with the assignment.
            Last edited by LtTim556; 10-18-2006, 02:56 AM.
            Vintage Firefighter: The older I get, the braver I was.

            Comment


            • #7
              Vollie perspective

              Well, I can agree....we all could say the cliche answers...to help people, yadda yadda yadda.... and yes it is about helping people, but also the bond/friendships you make with those you are working with...and of course, it can be quite an adrenaline rush! And, its just FUN...

              Comment


              • #8
                Hummm, no matter how many times I'm asked that question I never can seem to give a good answer. I honestly can't remember a time in my life that I did not want to be a Fire Fighter, so I can't really tell you what made me decide to it. Maybe I was just born that way, maybe it was watching my older brothers fight fires when I was still in diapers, maybe I was dropped as a child. Fire Fighting has been a major part of my entire life, and to me it is just a natural thing to do. To some people Fire Fighting is a profession, to me it's a life.

                Here is a quote that puts it in better words then I can.

                “I have no ambition in this world but one, and that is to be a firefighter The position may, in the eyes of some, appear to be a lowly one; but we who know the work which the firefighter has to do believe that his is a noble calling. There is an adage which says that, "Nothing can be destroyed except by fire." We strive to preserve from destruction the wealth of the world which is the product of the industry of men, necessary for the comfort of both the rich and the poor. We are defenders from fires of the art which has beautified the world, the product of the genius of men and the means of refinement of mankind. (But, above all; our proudest endeavor is to save lives of men-the work of God Himself. Under the impulse of such thoughts, the nobility of the occupation thrills us and stimulates us to deeds of daring, even at the supreme sacrifice. Such considerations may not strike the average mind, but they are sufficient to fill to the limit our ambition in life and to make us serve the general purpose of human society.”

                -- Chief Edward F. Croker FDNY circa 1910

                PKFPD
                IACOJ and proud of it


                Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Well............

                  First, Tyler - I wish you well with this project, I'll be keeping my fingers crossed that you get an "A". Also, some of will give you some funny answers, some will be a bit...... well.... off the wall, some might even be serious, just try to sort them out.

                  For me, Family is a part of what I do, and why I do it. Family - My Grandfather (Father's side) was a charter member of the Glenn Dale VFD ( www.gdvfd18.com ) back in 1928, as well as my oldest uncle. My Father and his other (3) brothers all joined as soon as they were old enough, as did most of my cousins and my brother and I. Today with our kids and Grandkids, and all the inlaws, there are about 16 of us, in three states, that Volunteer, and a couple that are Career Firefighters also. My two oldest Grandsons, Danny and David, Volunteer at Glenn Dale with me, they are the first of the fifth generation at the same VFD That my Grandfather helped start 78 years ago.

                  Without Family ties, I'd have been a Firefighter anyway, I'm sure. There is just something about this business that makes it stand out. I still am a very active member (currently Deputy Chief) and still run a lot of calls, about 650 last year. I'll slow down a bit as I get older (Maybe) in about...... Oh, another 30 years or so.
                  Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
                  In memory of
                  Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
                  Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

                  IACOJ Budget Analyst

                  I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

                  www.gdvfd18.com

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well firstly I never saw myself as a firefighter much less someone who could or would respond first hand to any emergency other than something that I had inadvertently created on my own.

                    I got into this "Job" when I moved to Malahat, BC during the summer of 2000. Earlier in the year I had met a member of the dept, and of course heard all about the "rousing tails" of excitment. Then my (now ex) wife and I started looking for a house to buy, and Charlie just happened to have received orders to head to England for two years on the Canadian submarine program. It was he whom I had met earlier. And of course we bought his house, which just happened to be located four doors down from the fire hall.

                    Each time that we went to visit the house, and check out the area, it seemed that the Chief was always "visiting" Charlie..... funny thing that eh? LOL Anyhow, after we got moved in and settled, I went down to see how things work. That was August 2000, and other than the forced 6 months that I had to sit back and wait after moving here to DC, to find a new "Home".......... I've never looked back.

                    As some folks in here know, my old station took a hell of a beating and very nearly came to the point of closing its doors due to some very unfortunate events, but Malahat is still going strong as a volunteer fire department, and I am progressing well at this end.

                    ON a note regarding Chief Woods.... the day he SLOWS down will be the day that the world stops TURNING! I am sure he was "there" when the Big Guy Upstairs said: "Let there be a Fireman." (only because he was here before the PC stuff came in) As long as there is a Woods in the fire service, all will be well. And so it has been, and always will be. LOL
                    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

                    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

                    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

                    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

                    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

                    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I thought that my local department back in Kentucky was a paid on call and when I was told otherwise when turning in the application,I figured I was too far into it now to back out.
                      Over the three years of volunteering that I did,I learned stuff that matched what I'd learned in the Navy in shipboard firefighting and things that never occurred to me.
                      I got enough training to take the Firefighter I and II tests within 2 1/2 years,and have now completed EMT-IV school here in Tennessee and am waiting to be cleared to take the National Registry exam.
                      I am wanting badly to return to Kentucky and my old volunteer department but have family concerns here that come first.
                      One thing I've said in other forums was that the best part of being on a volunteer or paid fire department is you know more than what is shown on the 6 o'clock news.
                      The bad thing is too often,you cannot discuss what you know about what the news couldn't or didn't show and that is not always a bad thing.

                      On reflection,one thing that needs to be said is rarely will you find someone regretting getting into this line of work.The hours are long,the pay is short or nonexistent,and it takes a lot out of you doing it,mentally,physically and emotionally.Still,there are kids at school visits that think this is the coolest thing they've ever heard of and there are people who've lost everything yer are so grateful to you and your department for working to keep their world from going really bad.
                      I didn't join my old department to go screaming through town at 90+mph.I joined because I needed a job and found that helping when things went wrong was better than any paycheck.And I know the paid brethren and sistren don't do it just for the money either.
                      Last edited by doughesson; 10-18-2006, 12:01 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I got into firefighting becuase my father was the chief of my department when I was younger, and his father was also a firefighter. I always enjoyed being around the station and decided to join when I turned 18, while still in high school.

                        A few months after I joined, I caught a job (working structure fire) in Havana. We were second due for mutual aid. We stayed on scene around 4 or 5 hours. After everything was all cleaned up I went to my car to put my gear away. I heard someone behind me and turned around. There was an old man standing there staring at me. I stared back for a second, then he reached down, grabbed my hand and shook it. He then walked away without saying a word. I was hooked after that. I'm now the Training Officer and have been serving for over 5 years.

                        Later on that year I decided I wanted to go paid. I haven't found a paid department yet, but I have all the professional certifications required plus some and work in EMS.

                        Short answer, I do it because of the fun and family (mine and brotherhood).
                        TO/EMT CVFD (1219)
                        EMT GEMS
                        CPT/EMT MVFD
                        ---------------------------------------------------
                        Proud Member of IACOJ
                        ---------------------------------------------------
                        9-11-01 Never Forget FDNY 343

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Driving a BRT really fast and blowing through red lights and stop signs. The great pay and fantastic benies. All the nights/weekends/ holidays away from family.








                          Fire Marshal/Safety Officer

                          IAAI-NFPA-IAFC/VCOS-Retired IAFF

                          "No his mind is not for rent, to any god or government"
                          RUSH-Tom Sawyer

                          Success is when skill meets opportunity
                          Failure is when fantasy meets reality

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Dave1983
                            Driving a BRT really fast and blowing through red lights and stop signs. The great pay and fantastic benies. All the nights/weekends/ holidays away from family.








                            That, in case you didnt notice, is one of the funny responses that HWoods mentioned.

                            Unless you were serious Dave.
                            Shawn M. Cecula
                            Firefighter
                            IACOJ Division of Fire and EMS

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Uh Huh................

                              Originally posted by Lewiston2Capt
                              That, in case you didnt notice, is one of the funny responses that HWoods mentioned.

                              Unless you were serious Dave.
                              Gee, Thanks for reminding me. There was a time when I had a Ford Crown Vic (Unmarked) for a Chief's vehicle. I did enjoy some fast trips in that one. I also enjoyed blowing thru radar and getting a friendly wave from the Cops who were sure that I was one of their own. Ahhhh....... Never a dull moment, and certainly another of the 626,830,721 reasons that I love doing this.
                              Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
                              In memory of
                              Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
                              Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

                              IACOJ Budget Analyst

                              I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

                              www.gdvfd18.com

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X