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Train Buffs......'little help?

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  • grendle
    replied
    sorry brother, I collect steam whistles.

    Leave a comment:


  • Irons6789
    replied
    Overkill is only an Understatement!

    Wow, all I can say is that must be obnoxious. Talk about unessassary use of the warning devices available to us...Lets think now, do we honestly need to blast 3 types of sirens, train horn, the Q and the regular air horns in what seems to be a quiet residential neighborhood with NO traffic at night? Sure it is important to respond safely but what the heck is that?


    And now for something completely different:

    Many years ago, Ladder 120 in Brooklyn didnt have an air horn. There was a point where the city was not providing them. The Sanitation Dept. did however have air horns on the garbage trucks. Somehow, one of them wound up on 120 shortly afterwards!!! Rescue 2 also obtained a horn, this one from Amtrak at some point and rigged it up so that a full bottle could power it.

    Leave a comment:


  • LuckyThirteen
    replied
    If that doesn't get someone's attention, I don't know what would.

    Leave a comment:


  • skipatrol8
    replied
    i'd hafta agree

    you think the people in that neigborhood were happy? i couldnt imagine riding in that thing...a train horn? and the dual rotorays on that quantum...

    Leave a comment:


  • WFDjr1
    replied
    Overkill, anyone?

    Leave a comment:


  • skipatrol8
    replied
    called squadzilla...
    http://www.shrewsburyfire.com/Rescue...Squadzilla.htm

    also,
    great video with train horn, stutter horn, q, and powercall

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=voukMh6AcV0

    both PA departments i think, i forget the video's department

    Leave a comment:


  • NYSmokey
    replied
    Remember this????
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:


  • DennisTheMenace
    replied
    So what all does it take to install one of these bad boys on a road going vehicle without the advantage of a factory airbrake system?

    Leave a comment:


  • NJFFSA16
    replied
    Here's a great site to hear various types of train horns

    http://atsf.railfan.net/airhorns/

    Leave a comment:


  • NJFFSA16
    replied
    History and Background

    As diesel locomotives began to replace steam on North American railroads, it was realized that the new locomotives were unable to utilize the steam whistles then in use.

    Early locomotives were initially fitted with truck horns, but these were found to be unsuitable. And so the air horn design was modified for railroad use.

    Operation

    Train horns are operated by compressed air, typically 130-145 psi, and fed from a locomotive main air reservoir. On locomotives built prior to the early 1990s, they are actuated by a manual lever/pull-cord. Locomotives built today make use of pushbutton controls.

    The basic operation of a train horn, or most any air horn for that matter, is that the air flow throughout the horn causes oscillation, producing sound waves. Oscillation in a train horn is via a diaphragm. When air is applied to the horn, the diaphragm begins to vibrate. Since the position of the diaphragm at any given moment during the vibration will allow more or less air through the horn, the constant oscillation of the diaphragm causes "waves" of air which in turn produce audible sound.

    The configuration and dimensions of the bell ("bell" being the correct term for the trumpet) determine the frequency produced (measured in hertz), and hence, the fundamental.

    Many early train horns (1950s-era) were designed to play basic musical chords.

    Manufacturers

    There have been six major manufacturers of air horns for railroad use in North America. Of these, only Airchime, Ltd. and Leslie Controls, Inc. remain today:

    Gustin Bacon Mfg. Co.
    The Gustin Bacon Mfg. Co. of Kansas City, MO offered airhorns for use on railroad equipment prior to the Second World War.

    The American Strombos Co.
    The American Strombos Co. of Philadelphia, PA (later known as Buell) sold modified truck horns for rail use. They were often installed on small locomotives, as well as rapid transit equipment such as PCC cars.

    Westinghouse Air Brake Co.
    Westinghouse (under their WABCO subsidiary) was the first to offer airhorns specifically for railroad equipment, going as far back as the 1910s. Their model E2 was known by many for the deep, commanding tone it produced. Overshadowed later on by their postwar competitors, WABCO no longer produces horns for the North American market.

    The Leslie Co.

    Leslie model S5T, widely regarded by aficionados as the 'king of horns'. This specimen is painted in the gray scheme of the Seaboard System Railroad.The Leslie Co. originally began horn production by obtaining the rights to manufacture Kockum Sonic's line of Tyfon brand airhorns, marketing these for railroad use in the early 1930s. Their model A200 series graced the rooftops of countless locomotives, such as the legendary Pennsylvania Railroad GG1, as well as thousands of EMD E and F-units. Leslie would later develop their own line of multi-note airhorns, known as the SuperTyfon series, in direct competition with Nathan-AirChime. Until recently, SuperTyfon horns were the mainstay of almost all railroad motive power in the United States.

    Nathan-AirChime, Ltd.

    AirChime model K3L, shown here in a wonderful Auburn University paint scheme.
    An early Nathan-AirChime model P5 locomotive air horn, later versions are used by such railroads as the Norfolk Southern.Nathan-AirChime, Ltd. got their start in train horn production through the work of Robert Swanson in 1949. Prior to the early 1950s, locomotives were equipped with airhorns that sounded but a single note. Swanson set out to change this by developing a horn which could almost mimic the sound of a classic steam whistle. Using ancient Chinese musical theory, Swanson produced the six-note model H6. However pleasant the horn may have sounded, this was impractical for railroad use due to its immense size (over two feet tall), and weight (almost 100 pounds in the initial cast iron version). Since railroad equipment operates in areas restricted by physical clearance, the difference of only a few inches may prohibit that equipment from operating on the line in question. Swanson would later refine the design into the H5. As the model number indicates, this horn sounded a five-note, adjustable chord. Nathan-AirChime has since gone on to perfect their horn design with the M (1950), P (1953), and K (1954) series, respectively.

    Prime Manufacturing, Inc.
    Prime Manufacturing, Inc. had produced locomotive appliances for many years prior to their entry into the horn market in the early 1970s. Basically a derivative of the Leslie SuperTyfon design (due to a Leslie patent expiration), though the Prime versions employed heavier castings and sounded a somewhat richer tone as a result. Sales were brisk (Union Pacific was a notable customer), and unable to keep up with offerings from Leslie and Nathan-AirChime, as well as ever-stringent government regulation, Prime left the horn market in 1999.

    For some nice samples in wav files visit:
    http://www.answers.com/topic/train-horn

    Leave a comment:


  • NJFFSA16
    replied
    Originally posted by E229Lt
    I have exhausted myself searching for a K, P or M series horn in restorable condition, or useable for that matter.

    It's not that I can't find them but I was hoping to aquire one without a second mortgage on my home.

    Any help out there?
    Artie......I know you want your Engine to be heard...but isn't the train horn a little overkill?

    You may have to climb up on one of those old locos one night...and grab one yerself!

    Leave a comment:


  • FlyingKiwi
    replied
    Will all the Train Spotters and there pet Anoraks please report to Platform 4.

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Ok...............

    I See..... Good Job. I kinda have a liking for the older Nathan 5 Chime model that graced the early Alco Hood Units. But then, I'm an Alco Fan anyway......

    Leave a comment:


  • FWDbuff
    replied
    Originally posted by hwoods
    Incredible. To borrow from a TV Show, "How'd he do that?" One question. Is Nathan still in business??
    Chief, I just cut-and-pasted from one of my favorite websites, trainhorns.net

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Wow!!.....................

    Incredible. To borrow from a TV Show, "How'd he do that?" One question. Is Nathan still in business??

    Leave a comment:

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