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  • Talk about commitment

    I was reading about the amazing people who guard the tomb of the unknown soldier and I thought I would share. This kind of commitment to a fallen brother whos name they don't even know leaves me speechless.

    1. How many steps does the guard take during his walk across the
    tomb of the Unknowns and why?


    A. 21 steps. It alludes to the twenty-one gun salute, which is the highest honor given any military or foreign dignitary.

    2. How long does he hesitate after his about face to begin his return walk and why?

    A. 21 seconds for the same reason as answer number 1

    3. Why are his gloves wet?

    A. His gloves are moistened to prevent his losing his grip on the rifle.

    4. Does he carry his rifle on the same shoulder all the time and if not, why not?

    A. He carries the rifle on the shoulder away from the tomb. After his march across the path, he executes an about face and moves the rifle to the outside shoulder.

    5. How often are the guards changed?

    A. Guards are changed every thirty minutes, twenty-four hours a day, 365 days a year.

    6. What are the physical traits of the guard limited to?

    For a person to apply for guard duty at the tomb, he must be between 5' 10" and 6' 2" tall and his waist size cannot exceed 30.

    Other facts.


    1. They must commit 2 years of life to guard the tomb, live in a barracks under the tomb, and cannot drink any alcohol on leave or off duty for the rest of their lives.
    2. They cannot swear in public for the rest of their lives and cannot disgrace the uniform {fighting} or the tomb in any way.
    3. After two years, the guard is given a wreath pin that is worn on their lapel signifying they served as guard of the tomb. There are only 400 presently worn. The guard must obey these rules for the rest of their lives or give up the wreath pin.
    4. The shoes are specially made with very thick so les to keep the heat and cold from their feet. There are metal heel plates that extend to the
    top of the shoe in order to make the loud click as they come to a halt.
    5. There are no wrinkles, folds or lint on the uniform. Guards dress for duty in front of a full-length mirror. Every guard spends five hours a day getting his uniform ready for guard duty.
    6. The first six months of duty a guard cannot talk to anyone, nor watch TV.
    7. All off duty time is spent studying the 175 notable people laid to rest in Arlington National Cemetery . A guard must memorize who they are and where they are interred. Among the notabl es are: President Taft, Joe E. Lewis {the boxer} and Medal of Honor winner Audie Murphy, {the most decorated soldier of WWII} of Hollywood fame.
    8. In 2003 as Hurricane Isabelle was approaching Washington , DC , our US Senate/House took 2 days off with anticipation of the storm. On the ABC
    evening news, it was reported that because of the dangers from the hurricane, the military members assigned the duty of guarding the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier were given permission to suspend the assignment. They respectfully declined the offer, "No way, Sir!" Soaked to the skin, marching in the pelting rain of a tropical storm, they said that guarding the Tomb was not just an assignment, it was the highest honor that can be afforded to a serviceperson. The tomb has been patrolled continuously, 24/7, since 1930.



    PKFPD
    IACOJ and proud of it


    Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.

  • #2
    That is one visit I have yet to engage, before my tour here ends.

    The respect of one soldier to another.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

    "I may be slow, but my work is poor." Chief Dave Balding, MVFD

    "Its not Rocket Science. Just use a LITTLE imagination." (Me)

    Get it up. Get it on. Get it done!

    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

    IACOJ member: Cheers, Play safe y'all.

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    • #3
      Some of the things posted by PKFD were wrong... I googled the tomb of the unknown soldier and came up with this..

      How does the Guard rotation work? Is it an 8 hour shift?

      Currently, the Tomb Guards work on a three Relief (team) rotation - 24 hours on, 24 hours off, 24 hours on, 24 hours off, 24 hours on, 96 hours off. However, over the years it has been different. The time off isn't exactly free time. It takes the average Sentinel 8 hours to prep his/her uniform for the next work day. Additionally, they have Physical Training, Tomb Guard training, and haircuts to complete before the next work day.

      How many steps does the Guard take during his walk across the Tomb of the Unknowns and why?

      21 steps. It alludes to the twenty-one gun salute, which is the highest honor given any military or foreign dignitary.

      How long does the Sentinel hesitate after his about face to begin his return walk and does he carry his rifle on the same shoulder all the time, and if not, why not?

      He does not execute an about face. He stops on the 21st step, then turns and faces the Tomb for 21 seconds. Then he turns to face back down the mat, changes his weapon to the outside shoulder, counts 21 seconds, then steps off for another 21 step walk down the mat. He faces the Tomb at each end of the 21 step walk for 21 seconds. The Sentinel then repeats this over and over until he is relieved at the Guard Change.

      Why are his gloves wet?

      His gloves are moistened to improve his grip on the rifle.

      How often are the Guards changed?

      The Guard is changed every thirty minutes during the summer (April 1 to Sep 30) and every hour during the winter (Oct 1 to Mar 31). During the hours the cemetery is closed, the guard is changed every 2 hours. The Tomb is guarded, and has been guarded, every minute of every day since 1937.

      Is it true they must commit 2 years of life to guard the Tomb, live in a barracks under the tomb, and cannot drink any alcohol on or off duty for the rest of their lives.

      No, this is a false rumor. The average tour at the Tomb is about a year. There is NO set time for service there. The Sentinels live either in a barracks on Ft. Myer (the Army post located adjacent to the cemetery) or off base if they like. They do have living quarters under the steps of the amphitheater where they stay during their 24 hour shifts, but when they are off, they are off. And if they are of legal age, they may drink anything they like, except while on duty.

      Is it true they cannot swear in public for the rest of their lives?

      Again, another false rumor.

      Is it true after two years, the guard is given a wreath pin that is worn on their lapel signifying they served as Guard of the Tomb, that there are only 400 presently worn, and that the Guard must obey these rules for the rest of their lives or give up the wreath pin?

      The Tomb Guard Identification Badge is awarded after the Sentinel passes a series of tests. The Badge is permanently awarded after a Sentinel has served 9 months as a Sentinel at the Tomb. Over 500 have been awarded since its creation in the late 1950's. And while the Badge can be revoked, the offense must be such that it discredits the Tomb. Revocation is at the Regimental Commander’s discretion. But you can drink a beer and even swear and still keep the Badge. The Badge is a full size award, worn on the right pocket of the uniform jacket, not a lapel pin.

      Are the shoes specially made with very thick soles to keep the heat and cold from their feet?

      The shoes are standard issue military dress shoes. They are built up so the sole and heel are equal in height. This allows the Sentinel to stand so that his back is straight and perpendicular to the ground. A side effect of this is that the Sentinel can "roll" on the outside of the build up as he walks down the mat. This allows him to move in a fluid fashion. If he does this correctly, his hat and bayonet will appear to not "bob" up and down with each step. It gives him a more formal and smooth look to his walk, rather than a "marching" appearance.

      The soles have a steel tip on the toe and a "horseshoe" steel plate on the heel. This prevents wear on the sole and allows the Sentinel to move smoothly during his movements when he turns to face the Tomb and then back down the mat.

      Then there is the "clicker". It is a shank of steel attached to the inside of the face of the heel build-up on each shoe. It allows the Sentinel to click his heels during certain movements. If a guard change is really hot, it is called a "smoker" because all the heel clicks fall together and sound like one click. In fact, the guard change is occasionally done in the "silent" mode (as a sign of devotion to the Unknowns"). No voice commands - every thing is done in relation to the heel clicks and on specific counts.
      How many times will a Soldier be on duty during the shift?

      Each Relief (team) has a rotation during the 24 hour work day. This rotation is dependent on the number of Soldier-Sentinels who are proficient enough to guard the Tomb. The standard is 3-4 qualified Sentinels, 1-2 Relief Commander/Assistant Relief Commander, and 1-2 Sentinels in training. Generally, the Sentinel will be on guard duty for a tour and have two tours off in between - then go out for another tour. However, in extreme cases, Sentinels have been known to go back-to-back for the entire 24 hour shift.

      How do the Soldiers get to and from the quarters without being seen?

      Most wear civilian clothes - although the short, tight haircuts tend to give us away.

      There is a small green shack next to the Tomb. What is it for?

      "The Box" is used primarily during wreath-laying ceremonies for the Sentinel to retreat to while flowers and Taps are being presented. There also is a phone with a direct line downstairs to the Tomb Guard Quarters - this is used in times of emergencies or just to notify the next shift of something.

      Has anyone ever tried to get past the Tomb guards, or attempted to deface the Tomb?

      Yes, that is the reason why we now guard the Tomb. Back in the early 1920's, we didn't have guards and the Tomb looked much different (see attached picture). People often came to the cemetery in those days for picnics during which time some would actually use the Tomb as a picnic area (probably because of the view). Soon after, 1925, they posted a civilian guard; in 1926, a military guard was posted during cemetery hours; and on July 1, 1937, this was expanded to the 24-hour watch. Since then, the ceremony has developed throughout the years to what we have today. Today, most of the challenges faced by the Sentinels are tourists who want to get a better picture or uncontrolled children (which generally is very frightening for the parent when the Soldier challenges the child).

      What happened to the soldier that was in the Tomb from the Vietnam War?

      The remains of the Vietnam Unknown Soldier were exhumed May 14, 1998. Based on mitochondrial DNA testing, DoD scientists identified the remains as those of Air Force 1st Lt. Michael Joseph Blassie, who was shot down near An Loc, Vietnam, in 1972. It has been decided that the crypt that contained the remains of the Vietnam Unknown will remain vacant. (http://www.defenselink.mil/news/fact...tory/tomb.html)

      What is it like to guard in bad weather?

      The guards at the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier (we call ourselves "Sentinels") are completely dedicated to their duty of guarding the Tomb. Because of that dedication, the weather does not bother them. In fact, they consider it an honor to stand their watch (we call it "walking the mat"), regardless of the weather. It gets cold, it gets hot - but the Sentinels never budge. And they never allow any feeling of cold or heat to be seen by anyone.

      Do you guard in a blizzard or a bad thunderstorm?

      YES, BUT the accomplishment of the mission and welfare of the Soldier is never put at risk. The Tomb Guards have contingencies that are ready to be executed IF the weather conditions EVER place the Soldiers at risk of injury or death – such as lightning, high winds, etc. This ensures that Sentinels can maintain the Tomb Guard responsibilities while ensuring soldier safety. It is the responsibility of the Chain of Command from the Sergeant of the Guard to the Regimental Commander to ensure mission accomplishment and soldier welfare at all times.

      It was erroneously reported that during Hurricane Isabel, the Sentinels were ordered to abandon their posts for shelter and that they refused. No such order was ever given. All proper precautions were taken to ensure the safety of the Sentinels while accomplishing their mission. Risk assessments are constantly conducted by the Chain of Command during changing conditions to ensure that soldier welfare is maintained during mission accomplishment.

      Do you guard all night long, even when the cemetery is closed?

      The Tomb is guarded 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In fact, there has been a Sentinel on duty in front of the Tomb every minute of every day since 1937. And the Sentinel does not change the way he guards the Tomb, even at night when there is no one around. The Sentinels do this because they feel that the Unknown Soldiers who are buried in the Tomb deserve the very best they have to give.

      How many Sentinels have been female?

      There have been 3 female Sentinels and 1 female Platoon Leader.
      I have seen the changing of the guards at the Tomb of the Unkowns at Arlington National Cemeter. It is an impressive display of duty, honor and committment!
      Last edited by CaptainGonzo; 08-25-2006, 11:11 AM.
      ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
      Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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      • #4
        I have been to Arlington once. A very humbling experience.

        I had the priviledge of viewing (from a distance) an Air Force burial. Again, very humbling.


        I must have watched about 10 changes of the guard. Some people do not appreciate the freedoms that they have.


        It is quite a beautiful experience to see all the markers in perfect lines, in every every direction. As if they were Warriors, standing at the position of attention.

        I was also struck by the massive memorial to President Kennedy. A bit oppulent, personally - given the very simple marker right next to it.....of Robert Kennedy.

        I wish to return soon now that school is done. Might make a trip there again to see the Marine Corps Museum after it opens up.
        "Too many people spend money they haven't earned, to buy things they don't want, to impress people they don't like." Will Rogers

        The borrower is slave to the lender. Proverbs 22:7 - Debt free since 10/5/2009.

        "No man's life, liberty, or property are safe while the legislature is in session." - New York Judge Gideon Tucker

        "As Americans we must always remember that we all have a common enemy, an enemy that is dangerous, powerful and relentless. I refer, of course, to the federal government." - Dave Barry

        www.daveramsey.com www.clarkhoward.com www.heritage.org

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        • #5
          My apologies for any inaccuracies I posted, I neglected to take the time to double check my source. Thanks for having my back and catching the errors Gonzo. Regardless of the inaccuracies I admire and highly respect the people who have the honor of this detail. Someday I hope to see the changing of the guard in person.

          PKFPD
          IACOJ and proud of it


          Don't argue with an idiot; people watching may not be able to tell the difference.

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          • #6
            I had the honor of laying a wreath on the tomb. Very impressive cermony to watch and a frighting honor to take part of.
            Fir Na Tine
            Fir Na Au Saol

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            • #7
              I know public television(I think) had a documentary on the whole cemetery usually replayed around Memorial Day. It shows the behind the scenes of how the cemetery is run and includes a segment on the Guard, very impressive.

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              • #8
                wow, is about all I can say. Thanks for posting the information and pictures.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by needlejockey
                  I had the honor of laying a wreath on the tomb. Very impressive cermony to watch and a frighting honor to take part of.
                  I did also......... Many many years ago......... But, honestly, I was way too young to truly appreciate the whole experience
                  The comments made by me are my opinions only. They DO NOT reflect the opinions of my employer(s). If you have an issue with something I may say, take it up with me, either by posting in the forums, emailing me through my profile, or PMing me through my profile.
                  We are all adults so there is no need to act like a child........
                  IACOJ

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                  • #10
                    Why?

                    The previous posts open all sorts of wounds for each and every one of us.
                    Why was the Vietnam casualty exhumed and DNA'd?
                    Just today I was having a drink and a laugh with Ernst-a German of my age- both 66 yrs on this planet. As a child each and every night his father and his Luftwaffe mates would drop bombs on us -as would my father do to his family, bloody crazy world! We all carry scars--if this is not coming out as I intended apologies all round--for those of you who think war is glorious and macho--please, please read a book by Antony Beevor called "Stalingrad"

                    London took a hammering in the Blitz--compared to Stalingrad we got away very lightly.

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                    • #11
                      I found a video I thought I would share when they change the guards.... found it by typing a typo
                      http://video.yahoo.com/video/play?p=...D%26ei%3DUTF-8

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 2andfrom
                        The previous posts open all sorts of wounds for each and every one of us.
                        Why was the Vietnam casualty exhumed and DNA'd?
                        Just like us firefighters.. everybody goes home. Today's DNA technology allowed the military's forensic pathologists to determine the identity of the unknown from Vietnam, returning his remains to his family and giving them closure.
                        ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
                        Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks Gonzo, I should have worked it out-but as previously stated"old wounds"do not make you think straight.
                          I would imagine it was a mammoth task to bring a family some sort of peace-well done to the "White Coats"

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