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  • Another question for Dalmatian owners

    My newest addition is a rescue from the interstate. Picked her up Saturday, no listings for a lost dog in the area or anything yet. When we got her home, it looked like she had not ate in awhile, and she seems to be young, if she isn't claimed, I want to keep her, but she needs to be trained. I know she is shy and scared in unfamiliar territory and people, but will it pass? Any ideas to help earn her trust? The husband doesn't want to keep her if she doesn't get use to us and becomes more enjoyable.
    Lieutenant/EMT-B

    VSFFA Member

    "I'm a CCEMT-B."

    "Remember, if the world didn't suck, we'd all fall off."

    "A lack of effort will always lead to failure."

  • #2
    I don't own a dal, but I am a dog lover.

    First thing first: bring the dog to a vetereinarian andd have her checked out. You don't know if the dog was recently abandoned or tangled with any wild animal.. rabies can be a concern. The vet will also worm her and give her a few shots as a precaution.

    Second: give her a bath with a flea and tick killing shampoo. You don't want to "adopt" any other "family members"!

    Third: It will take time, but the dog will adjust. Dogs adopted from animal shelters adjust quite nicely. Here is a link to some information that can help you.

    http://www.buddydoghs.com/html/links.html
    ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
    Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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    • #3
      Just have patience and give her time. Dalmations are usually very owner oriented, and it will take time to adjust to her new home. Cap's advice on having her checked is spot on. Earn her trust and she'll be a great companion, and training should come naturally to her if done properly.
      Member IACOJ

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      • #4
        I couldn't really tell if this is your first dog from your post so please excuse me if you know all of this already I rescued a German Shorthaired Pointer (they look similiar to a Dalmation) 8 years ago and it was one of the best moves I've ever made. It took a while for her to adjust. Her previous owner was a real jack***. She became gun shy (his fault) and he didn't want her anymore. His loss was my gain. My dog growled at me when I first went to see her and she really wasn't overly friendly. However, after time she became very appreciative of a good home. Some tips from my experience:

        Get structure in the dog's life - Try to get a set schedule so they know when you are coming and going. It helps to ease their anxiety.

        Patience is key - There is a good possibility that they might destroy something in your house due to anxiety so you have to keep your guard up. Don't yell at them for something they did 3 hours ago. They don't understand and it will just make them more anxious.

        Frequent walks are good. It will help the dog get used to you and it tires them out a little. You should introduce the dog to people in a controlled environment first. Plenty of space so they aren't backed into a corner and no other animals around to start out.

        Like Capt Gonzo said, medical care is VERY important. Find a good vet. Shots, heartworm meds, flea/tick preventive, etc. Try to avoid quick fixes from the vet such as anti-anxiety meds. Since this dog might not have a history of good meals, I would get a raised food dish so when she eats she does not get a dangerous condition called Bloat. In laymen's terms, it happens when a dog eats too fast and it severely damages the gastrointestinal system. Young dogs are more prone to it and it can kill a dog. Keep certain foods such as chocolate out of reach. Again, this can kill a dog depending on how much they eat vs. their weight. If it doesn't kill them, it can make them a diabetic.

        Good luck. I hope it works out for you.
        Tom

        Never Forget 9-11-2001

        Stay safe out there!

        IACOJ Member

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        • #5
          Thanks guys!
          I've got another dal, Spot, he's my avatar. He's the sweetest thing since sugar!
          Anyway, named the rescue Smokey, she went to the vet, didn't fair so well, see wanted to bite the vet and the assistants! The vet said she had the typical dal temper! I'm not really use to dogs that aren't already trained! Puppies are rather easy to train, but Smokey, I think she'll be a handful if she isn't claimed.
          Lieutenant/EMT-B

          VSFFA Member

          "I'm a CCEMT-B."

          "Remember, if the world didn't suck, we'd all fall off."

          "A lack of effort will always lead to failure."

          Comment


          • #6
            I know someone that had a German Shorthaired Pointer that used to try to "bite" the vet and their handlers when she was getting examined. I don't think she ever did. The vet called it "fear biting" and they would muzzle her whenever she went there. That dog was a big baby around the family and she never showed any violent tendencies towards anyone in the community. She did bark at people that came over and it took her a few minutes to get used to them. The dog's owners admit that they should have socialized her with people and other dogs earlier in her life.
            Tom

            Never Forget 9-11-2001

            Stay safe out there!

            IACOJ Member

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            • #7
              I directed SC over to a Dalmatian board I hang out at for help with the behavioral issues in a bit more detail.

              Typical Dal temperment my sweet ***. They are guard dogs, and like any guard breed need to have caution exercised, and training is important.

              Like any dogs, some are safe to leave alone in a pre-school, some are fearful of their own shadows, and some take their guard dogging seriously.

              Anyway...regarding the German Shorthaired Pointer...

              If you breed away from the most notorious Dalmatian hereditary problem (about 1 in 7 are deaf)...you end up with a German Shorthaired. The same gene that carries the distinctive Dalmatian coat also carries the deafness.

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              • #8
                This is ****ing test...

                Oh never mind, just surprised the previous post didn't *** out ***.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Dalmatian190
                  Anyway...regarding the German Shorthaired Pointer...

                  If you breed away from the most notorious Dalmatian hereditary problem (about 1 in 7 are deaf)...you end up with a German Shorthaired. The same gene that carries the distinctive Dalmatian coat also carries the deafness.
                  Learn something new everyday
                  Tom

                  Never Forget 9-11-2001

                  Stay safe out there!

                  IACOJ Member

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                  • #10
                    I two have rescued a dal. some lady dumped it off at the station and I two already had a dal so I took it home. The dog was already house broke and leash broke, I though what a shame to be dumped like that. Now the down side the lady that droped him off said he was dumped on her and showed signs of being dumped before she got him. I thought " how can you tell" well my wife is a childerns social worker, said that hyde show all the classic signs of attachment disorder meaning that he would act out, not biting or anything just peeing and pooping in the house, and not when you were home just at night because we would lock him out of are room at night, surprize left at the door, and when you got on to him about it he would hide his head under the couch, very cute, but his cuteness didnt clean the poop up.

                    So after two years of working with the dog we had a break through when I bought him a indoor kennel. He loves it because he knows that is his own space. He will go in there and just hang out, we dont have to close the door most of the time.

                    You might try a kennel, and know I am happy to report no more messes in the house since even when we dont leave him in the kennel.

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                    • #11
                      ok I think i posted this already but it wasn't playing nice so here i go again with the history of the dalmation that I learned in my prevention class
                      The dalmation in the hall goes back to the horsedrawn days. When the horses left the stalls they would have the dogs nipping at the heels of the drawhorses to make them go fast. Once at thde fire the dogs would act as seccurity for the horses to defend them from bums, stray dogs, and any other stuff horses don't like. The reason we choose a Dalmation is because the spots made them easy to identify as a department dog.
                      J
                      It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog.

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                      • #12
                        They were used a carriage dogs in Europe because they are long winded and they would build a bond with the horses. Yes to protect the horse's, they would not nip at the heels of the horses because the dogs weren’t used at first. Back in the day when insurance companies ran the fire halls it was important to have the fastest horses in town, so fire companies would steal the fastest horses. Fireman would have to sleep in the barn or the bay with the horses so no one would steal them, until the dalmatian was used around the start of the civil war. Before they tried several types of dogs but the bigger houses like dalmatian because of there look but mostly because there so long winded.

                        Side note: Old horse firehouse that are two story like the fire museum in N.Y.C have a short turn then up the stairs, why? You ask. Because horses cant turn corners that sharp so when the dals. Where being used, the fire houses got bigger and the men could sleep up stairs away from the horses because the dogs would let them know if anyone was there.

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