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What Floor Please? Ladies Lingerie, Sporting Goods... Hardware

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  • CollegeBuff
    replied
    Gives whole new possibilities to the song, "Love in an Elevator....."

    Leave a comment:


  • MalahatTwo7
    replied
    Originally posted by E229Lt


    SHHHH, you'll wake up that whack with the rescue chutes!
    Lt, I rolled around on the floor LMAO for a good minute after reading your last.

    And SFD ya no kidding eh, the place would probably have it's own responders staged at specified intervals for exactly such an event.

    Leave a comment:


  • E229Lt
    replied
    I've never seen an elevator that didn't have a stairway nearby for emergencies
    SHHHH, you'll wake up that whack with the rescue chutes!

    Leave a comment:


  • hwoods
    replied
    Walk Up One Flight And Save.......

    Of course, I've never seen an elevator that didn't have a stairway nearby for emergencies.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Armyfirerescue
    replied
    Oh my, I do hate rocking the boat, and this is supposed to be a "happy forum" but I just want to say that I am so against the space program...that is all...

    Leave a comment:


  • MalahatTwo7
    replied
    I had that very same image in my head when I first read the article. It wasn't a happy image by any means. Added to the fact that I work with Search and Rescue (Air and Marine)....... well let's just say it was a deep sigh of unhappy.

    Leave a comment:


  • CollegeBuff
    replied
    I'm seeing a small Cessna with out-of-date charts putting a serious dent in the space program.....

    Leave a comment:


  • captstanm1
    replied
    "The target market is primarily men and their interest in a bigger, all-new SUV," Kenyon said.
    Now....I am offended by this discriminatory advertising scheme. Besides, who says that women may not want a "bigger" SUV???

    Leave a comment:


  • superchef
    replied
    27- You have wayyyy tooo much time on your hands.

    Leave a comment:


  • MalahatTwo7
    replied
    SIZE MATTERS?!! DOES SIZE MATTER?

    I guess maybe if you work at the Chrysler plant size does matter. LOL

    Oct 14, 5:00 PM EDT

    Durango'Size Matters' Ad to Debut Soon

    AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) -- DaimlerChrysler AG's Chrysler Group plans to start using a little bathroom humor next month during late-night television to pitch the 2004 model of its Dodge Durango sport utility vehicle.

    In the advertisement, two men standing side-by-side at rest room urinals are overheard discussing how "size" matters, The Detroit News reported Tuesday. The object of their attention is a Durango poster on the wall.

    The spot is the latest in a series of risque Chrysler ads that have implied wife-swapping among minivan owners and sexual relations in the back seat of a Concorde sedan.

    Chrysler spokesman James Kenyon said the ad is a tongue-in-cheek attempt to illustrate that the redesigned full-size Durango SUV is longer and wider than the model it replaces.

    "The target market is primarily men and their interest in a bigger, all-new SUV," Kenyon said.
    ---
    On the Net:

    www.daimlerchrysler.com

    Copyright 2003 Associated Press. All rights reserved.

    Leave a comment:


  • tanker5117
    replied
    Beam me up, Scotty!


    Tanker

    Leave a comment:


  • MalahatTwo7
    replied
    Lt, it never occured to me because we don't have elevators in our AOR. However yes it would make for some interesting changes in response SOP's.

    Leave a comment:


  • E229Lt
    replied
    Man, that's gonna be some rewrite in our "Elevator Emergencies" SOPs.

    Leave a comment:


  • What Floor Please? Ladies Lingerie, Sporting Goods... Hardware

    This elevator "goes to the Top" and then some.

    Researchers propose 100,000-kilometre Earth-to-space elevator

    Canadian Press Tuesday, October 14, 2003

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. (AP) - Researchers are proposing an elevator reaching 100,000 kilometres into the sky that would be able to launch payloads into space at a far lower cost than space shuttle.

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists are so convinced it can be a reality that they are working on their own time on technical details. Five to 10 scientists at any given time are analysing the economics, technical specifications of how the elevator would work and possible health risks to those using it.

    Lab scientist Bryan Laubscher said researchers hope the U.S. Department of Energy can someday use the information to start investing in a space elevator.

    "The first country that owns the space elevator will own space," Laubscher said. "I believe that, and I think Los Alamos should be involved in making that happen."

    The elevator shaft would be made of a strong, thin, lightweight material called carbon nanotubes. The shaft, really a 32 million-storey-tall cable, would be carried into orbit on a conventional spacecraft, then gradually dropped down to Earth and attached to an ocean platform along the equator.

    Solar-powered crawlers would move up and down the elevator, carrying payloads of satellites or probes to be placed in Earth's orbit or beyond. They also would attach additional cables to the main shaft that eventually would become new elevators.

    "It would create huge, huge savings over how we launch stuff now," said Ron Morgan, a health scientist working on the project. "From the top of it, we could throw things off to Mars or to the inner solar system. Launching those things on conventional rockets costs a fortune."

    A payload on the shuttle costs about $15,000 US per kilogram to launch into orbit, while a payload on the first space elevator likely would cost about $1,000 per kilogram, which could drop to $50 to $100 in time, Laubscher said.

    Significant technical questions remain. No one has made a carbon nanotube cable longer than a few metres but Laubscher said technology is improving daily, and a longer cable could be possible in a few years.

    Also, the Earth's magnetosphere, far above where the shuttle typically travels, could be a radiation hazard. Scientists say that wouldn't rule out equipment launches or space tourism in lower orbits.

    Steven Aftergood of the Federation of American Scientists in Washington, D.C., said the space elevator concept is ingenious but faces big obstacles including environmental and cost questions.

    "My comment would be, 'Good luck,' " he said.

    The researchers believe their time on the project is worth it.

    "None of us can imagine how the space elevator will change the world," Morgan said. "I'd love to be here 15 years after the first one is built to see how the world changes. I think it will change everything."

    © Copyright 2003 The Canadian Press


    I am not sure if this is a good idea or not. It might be a great money saver and a huge benefit to the space program, of which I am an avid supporter. However, such a structure just burns with the words, "Take me out" written all over it. Although the article indicates it would be anchored to the sea bottom, so security by distance would be there - sort of - I would hope.

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