Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cheffie stirs the pot and out comes....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • MalahatTwo7
    replied
    I have a few minutes here between eating and getting on with my history assignment, so I figured I would add what came out of the skillet tonight.

    BTW, what I describe below is or can be very very spicy hot, so if you are kinda low tolerant, please consider this your "Disclaimer statement". LOL

    Anyhow, a stop at the local grocery store produced:

    1 packet prime stew beef
    1 packet red snapper fillet
    1 packet stir fry veggies with chicken
    1 packet jumbo prawns
    1 packet Uncle Ben's Homestyle Chicken & Wild rice
    2 Habanaro peppers
    Cajun spice
    Frank's Red Hot
    Lemon juice
    Garlic powder (or fresh garlic if you have it)

    1) Prepare the rice according to packet instructions
    2) clean the prawns as needed, and dice chicken, snapper and beef as desired (I like mine in small bites - LOL)
    3) throw the meat items into a large skillet, with some olive oil, and pre-cook; add in liberal amounts of garlic powder and Cajun spice and a splash of the lemon juice
    4) chop the veggies etc to be added once the meat is nearly cooked completely then add in with a liberal dose of Frank's Red Hot and soya souce, ensure that the Habanaro's are diced very fine, they can be "just a little hot" sometimes.
    5) stir and cook for a about 10 minutes, stirring to ensure nothing sticks/burns (that would suck!! )
    6) serve

    When I dished mine up I made sure to splash a little of the meat juice on my rice. (I think we need a Smiley with fire shooting from his mouth )

    *There is just enough left over for lunch tomorrow so that I can tease Bevin, my co-worker - she is constantly amazed that I will cook meals like this for myself . Ok time to go.. my lips are on fire!**

    Leave a comment:


  • JOHN56
    replied
    CHEFFIE
    IT GOOD TO READ THAT YOU PASS YOUR TEST FOR PART 1 OF NFA
    READ YOUR DINNER I KNOW YOU WILL PASS THE REST OF THEM
    A LADY THAT CAN COOK LIKE YOU CAN, CAN PASSED ANY TEST
    IT GOOD TO HEAR FROM YOUR AGAIN THANK YOU AND GOOD LUCK IF YOU
    NEED THE LUCK
    DENNIS1975

    Leave a comment:


  • superchef
    replied
    no deep fried candy here. I take care of my crew

    Caramelized Onion, Apple and Brie Tartlets

    Pan Seared Top Loin Roast served with garlic-herb butter
    Pan seared then oven roasted and served with a garlic-herb butter. Picture the plate with thick slices with the butter melted over the crust and topped with fresh arugula, freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiao and then drizzled with a lemon garlic vinaigrette.

    Balsamic Glazed Baby Carrots and Green Beans

    Individual Chocolate Guiness Bundt Cakes
    served with a warm deep choclate sauce and more Guiness

    Stay safe all. Take care

    Leave a comment:


  • brubaker
    replied
    Hey...I don't find that funny! So I have a sence of humor, no big deal!

    Leave a comment:


  • ffexpCP
    replied
    Deep fried candy? - when did Homer Simpson join the FH forums?

    Leave a comment:


  • brubaker
    replied
    Deep fried candy? Mmmmm...wonder what that tastes like?

    Leave a comment:


  • 12TruckIrons
    replied
    The deep fried candy bars arent just in Texas they were at the SC state fair as well. Not just snickers either, if i remember correctly there was milky way, butterfinger, and 3 muskateer maybe a few others too.

    Leave a comment:


  • ffdfireexplorer
    replied
    whats your next creation going to be cheffie?

    Leave a comment:


  • superchef
    replied
    REMEMBER I DON'T WRITE THIS STUFF, I JUST FIND IT
    27- I am just a wee bit worried about you with these threads you have been posting. I think you need a vacation lad.

    Leave a comment:


  • MalahatTwo7
    replied
    REMEMBER I DON'T WRITE THIS STUFF, I JUST FIND IT

    Fair Goers Feed On Fried Snickers

    POSTED: 2:48 p.m. EDT October 22, 2003
    UPDATED: 3:11 p.m. EDT October 22, 2003

    DALLAS -- Don't have enough fat in your life? Try some deep-fried candy.

    The Wall Street Journal reports visitors to the Texas State Fair have had a chance to boost their cholesterol higher than Big Tex, the fair's giant cowboy.

    Fair goers lined up at Butch Benavides' booth to buy deep-fried Snickers. He says the batter has to be just right. If it's too thin, the chocolate melts. But if it's too thick, the candy bar puffs up like a fried pie.

    Benavides says another secret to fried confections is keeping them on a stick. He says fair goers like to eat on the go.

    For those of you who'd like to try frying a candy bar or two at home, here's the method:

    You'll need a good batter, something sticky enough to hold onto the bar, but one that won't puff up too much and turn your bar into a biscuit. Storebought funnel cake or beer-batter mixes, chilled for 30 minutes before use, will do the trick.

    Next, you'll want to make sure the bars are ready. For home deep fryers, the snack-size bars are easier to handle than full-size ones. Put a wooden skewer through each unwrapped bar longwise, then put them in the freezer for 30 minutes until cold all the way through.

    Heat oil in deep fryer to 360° Fahrenheit. Dust each bar with flour, then roll in batter, coating thoroughly. Allow excess to drop off.

    Fry bars, holding onto the end of the skewer to keep them submerged, until batter is golden brown, about four minutes. Dust with powdered sugar, if desired.

    Copyright 2003 by ClickOnDetroit.com.


    This is something I would have expected the British to try because they deep fry just about everything... some of which is really not as bad as it sounds. But this one kinda took the prize for the day. (so far anyway)

    Leave a comment:


  • 4bugles
    replied
    Thanks Cheffie!

    I will try it again, probably next week, it's going to take me awhile to find that balsamic you mentioned, as our food workers are on strike here too, so I have to travel to find a decent selection.

    Leave a comment:


  • superchef
    replied
    balsamic reductions 101

    not quite as exciting as bondage 101 but then again, if you cook her a fantastic meal..who knows it may lead to 27's thread.

    Here are some of the basics ;
    When you are sauteing the meat, chose a pan that will just fit the meat without cramping it. Too much surface areaa will result in burned juices and too little will prevent juices from caramelizing. Saute or roast the meat first (also don't use a nonstick pan as you will not get those browned bits you need for your sauce.). Once the meat is done, remove it and keep it warm. Remove any excess fat. Add 2 minced shallots and cook over medium heat till they soften (about 1-2 minutes). Deglaze by adding the balsamic vinegar, about 1/3 to 1/2 cup (enough to cover bottom of pan. As liquid simmers, scrape bottom of pan with wooden spoon and stir to disolve the caramelized juices. Simmer until the liquid is reduced by one half. If you want a more intense layer of flavor, once it has reduced, add some stock (low sodium) and reduce again. For the best flavors, reduce liquids at a steady simmer so that some of the sauce spatters on the sides of pan where it can caramelize. Season with salt and pepper.

    As for the type of vinegar, a good quality aged (7-10 years) is what I like to use. One I found I like is Aceto Balsamico Di Moderna It works well in salad dressings too. I try to avoid the cheap store brands as they tend to not be real balsamic vinegar.

    Here is one more but I do not know if you can get it everywhere but it is so good.

    Grand reserve Balsamic Vinegar The brand is Napa Valley Naturals, cherry wood aged for 18 years (for $9 for a bottle, at least that is what I paid for it.)

    Hope this helps.
    Last edited by superchef; 10-20-2003, 11:36 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • 4bugles
    replied
    Cheffie,
    Congrats on your first NFA certificate!

    I have a food question for you. A place near me has a steak meal that has a reduced balsamic vinegar sauce. It's a delicious sauce, that I have tried to replicate in my own kitchen with some bad results. I have tried the cheap stuff as well as the more expensive stuff. I would ask the place, but they are a little funny about sharing there recipe's...Would you have any suggestions? There doesn't seem to be anything else to it other than the vinegar.

    Leave a comment:


  • StayBack500FT
    replied
    Cheffie!! I have sooooooo missed your cookin'!!

    Leave a comment:


  • superchef
    replied
    A blushing smiley! Thanks webteam!

    Herb and Garlic Roasted Cornish Game Hens
    Rubbed with a garlic, lemon, thyme. red pepper and rosemary butter, then roasted till golden brown...

    Pan Roasted Baby Potatoes
    Baby red, yellow and purple potatoes, pan roasted and tossed with a dijon dressing...

    Balsamic Glazed Roasted Vegetables
    Red and orange bell peppers, baby carrots, sweet red onions, cherry tomatoes, tossed with a balsamic-herb glaze and oven roasted...

    Bourbon-Orange Pecan Pie served with Bourbon Whipped Cream

    I have to test this one out now..

    Leave a comment:

300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

Collapse

Upper 300x250

Collapse

Taboola

Collapse

Leader

Collapse
Working...
X