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    ShredddinCali
    Forum Member

  • ShredddinCali
    replied
    Originally posted by sean128 View Post
    Well Figured ill update you guys.

    Went to Ham Radio Outlet in Salem,NH and got the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual. Great book. About 25 Dollars. Has the entire Tech Question Pool in the back. Gotta love that. Planning on taking the test some time this summer.

    Here's the Question pool:
    http://www.ncvec.org/downloads/2006tech.pdf

    PS also looking for any Classes In the Boston,Mass Area.
    You can take practice test online which are the same questions used for the exam. Here are some locations: http://www.eham.net/exams/ and http://www.qrz.com/testing.html

    good luck!

    Leave a comment:

  • sean128
    Forum Member

  • sean128
    replied
    Well Figured ill update you guys.

    Went to Ham Radio Outlet in Salem,NH and got the ARRL Ham Radio License Manual. Great book. About 25 Dollars. Has the entire Tech Question Pool in the back. Gotta love that. Planning on taking the test some time this summer.

    Here's the Question pool:
    http://www.ncvec.org/downloads/2006tech.pdf

    PS also looking for any Classes In the Boston,Mass Area.

    Leave a comment:

  • KC8CBS
    Forum Member

  • KC8CBS
    replied
    I'm in Northeast Ohio (KC8CBS) I've been a Ham since 1991.

    Leave a comment:

  • HVFD65LRS372
    Forum Member

  • HVFD65LRS372
    replied
    Ham operator here! I took the techician class back in Feb. and studied a little for the general by taking the tests on QRZ. I took my technician test and passed it and went ahead and took my general test that night and passed it too. KI4TSN in SW Virginia. I work mostly out of 146.985 which is Big Walker Mtn. repeater linked into a few others in the area. It's also hooked up to the Echolink. I worked a guy from Texas on that repeater. He was on Echolink and I was mobile on a HT.

    Any other hams here?

    Leave a comment:

  • RitzvilleFD
    Forum Member

  • RitzvilleFD
    replied
    I'm starting classes for a General rating tomorrow night. It's going to run once a week for about 10 weeks, 2 hours per night. I don't have a local radio club near me, so I'm looking at about 3 hours drive time for a 2 hour class each week. I've been taking Technician Class tests online and consistantly getting in the mid to high 90's. I was going to get a Technician Class rating and talked to the instructor about it. He suggested I take the General Class. I'll have to take the Technician test and pass it before I can take the General test, but he said with practice scores like I've been getting it won't be a problem. I'm kind of bummed about the CW requirement going away, I was looking forward to learning it. I plan on learning it on my own.

    Now to decide on a rig and shack setup...

    Leave a comment:

  • gatoremt
    Forum Member

  • gatoremt
    replied
    You are right. I am tone deaf. I am surprised I passed it. I stay on UHF most of the time or on echo link. I used HF for awhile but moved and have not put my wire back up.
    I use to bring my HT to work all the time but not able to bring it anymore. When I work with EMS, I brought my HT ALL THE TIME. That way I had a back up radio if needed.

    Leave a comment:

  • KenNFD1219
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • KenNFD1219
    replied
    Originally posted by gatoremt View Post
    I passed the code but have never used it.
    Nothing wrong with that. Unlike most pro-coders, I don't care if someone uses it or not. It is more important to be on the air, regardless of mode. CW is a lot of fun, so is PSK-31, RTTY, SSB, FM, etc, etc.

    Leave a comment:

  • gatoremt
    Forum Member

  • gatoremt
    replied
    I passed the code but have never used it.

    Leave a comment:

  • KenNFD1219
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • KenNFD1219
    replied
    The Morse code requirement for HF access going away, most likely in February. Here is an article from the ARRL http://www.arrl.org/news/stories/2006/12/19/101/?nc=1

    No reason not to take the test for a license. Personally, I like using code, it gets through when conditions are rough and is really the international language of amateur radio.

    Leave a comment:

  • gatoremt
    Forum Member

  • gatoremt
    replied
    I would say check http://www.w5yi.org/ They can help. Good luck I have been a HAM since 1999. I have heard they are dropping the code for General and Extra here soon. Good lUck email if yo uhave any questions.

    Leave a comment:

  • cellblock
    Forum Member

  • cellblock
    replied
    When I worked for the local FD I installed a 2meter on the radio desk and ran the antenna to the roof. It was used once a couple of times to check in during Simulated Emergency Tests. The rest of the time it was a good way to spend spare time. I'd check in to nets or talk to out of state hams via repeaters equipted with IRLP or ECHOLINK.

    Steve,
    Ham Call- KC5SAS

    edit- Just to clarify, I ws not working as a dispatcher for our FD but as a FF/EMT. Our dispatching was done by a 911 operator in another city. Our radio desk held our base radios and a backup paging system.
    cellblock
    Forum Member
    Last edited by cellblock; 11-06-2006, 05:15 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • ffemtbland
    Forum Member

  • ffemtbland
    replied
    go for your tech class! its a great first step to becoming an "all out" hf ham. i'm a volunteer ff/emt in wisconsin - my interest in amateur radio came with all of the severe weather we had here in so. wisc in the summer of 05. listening to the ham bands gave us a really good idea of where a lot of the damage was after the big tornado that year. i always throw my ht in my gear bag when i go on call ... its another GREAT communication tool - communication in the emergency services field is really important ...
    Lars
    Madison, WI

    Leave a comment:

  • sean128
    Forum Member

  • sean128
    replied
    Pm

    Originally posted by KenNFD1219
    I usually have a 2 meter HT or mobile in the car. When I worked on shift, I would use the HT as a scanner for the local and area public safety frequencies.

    Years ago, I brought my low power HF radios (kits) to work and put a dipole in the attic. Worked a few stations at night. I only did that a few times.

    PM me if you need information on getting a license. I've been active on amateur radio since 1977.
    Ken i have seemed to have messed up my profile. Email me at [email protected]

    Leave a comment:

  • sean128
    Forum Member

  • sean128
    replied
    Hey Ken give me an email at [email protected]

    Leave a comment:

  • KenNFD1219
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • KenNFD1219
    replied
    I usually have a 2 meter HT or mobile in the car. When I worked on shift, I would use the HT as a scanner for the local and area public safety frequencies.

    Years ago, I brought my low power HF radios (kits) to work and put a dipole in the attic. Worked a few stations at night. I only did that a few times.

    PM me if you need information on getting a license. I've been active on amateur radio since 1977.

    Leave a comment:

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