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  • #16
    Originally posted by MattyS View Post
    The Jersey Capt. speaks of the truth..a heat hole must be cut above/nearest the seat of the fire as possible to buy you time for your strips. And with well trained companies you should have no problem dropping in 2 strips in a timely matter. Good working saws, fuel and good chains + training = a successful strip evolution. Like MattyJ said, as you progress on the roof make smoke indicator cuts off the purlins and beams you are working off of to determine conditions within the attic/cockloft.
    You can have as many saws and as much fuel as you like. It's not the cutting that is time consuming and exausting. It is the pulling of the roof material to actually form the cut. This requires manpower, not "good chains".

    No offense MattyS...but if you are suggesting to make a second trench in case the first one fails to work, then you have never actually cut a trench at a fire.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MattyS View Post
      The Jersey Capt. speaks of the truth..a heat hole must be cut above/nearest the seat of the fire as possible to buy you time for your strips. And with well trained companies you should have no problem dropping in 2 strips in a timely matter. Good working saws, fuel and good chains + training = a successful strip evolution. Like MattyJ said, as you progress on the roof make smoke indicator cuts off the purlins and beams you are working off of to determine conditions within the attic/cockloft.

      Just a small note. The hole over the fire is not to "buy time" to get the trench going...it is to vent the top floor and cockloft (a routine tactic at top floor fires),allowing members to get the fire out, so a trench isnt even considered.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by MattyJ View Post
        Just a small note. The hole over the fire is not to "buy time" to get the trench going...it is to vent the top floor and cockloft (a routine tactic at top floor fires),allowing members to get the fire out, so a trench isnt even considered.

        Unless youve decided on a trench operation, like this whole thread is about and which you have already stated is a defensive manuever (meaning no members in the fire attack room/area). then, your heat hole is used to "buy time" via the venting it produces.
        The good thing about this job is that we have done so much, with so little, for so long that we can do everything with nothing...... which is what is wrong with this job.
        KTF | DTRT

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        • #19
          Originally posted by jakesdad View Post
          You can have as many saws and as much fuel as you like. It's not the cutting that is time consuming and exausting. It is the pulling of the roof material to actually form the cut. This requires manpower, not "good chains".

          No offense MattyS...but if you are suggesting to make a second trench in case the first one fails to work, then you have never actually cut a trench at a fire.
          Pulling roof material is time consuming and exHausting.....unless youre louvering, dicing, doing pullbacks or doing drop cuts. But hey, you work on my truck company in my dept., so you know exactly what level of training we have, how coordinated we are in our work, or how often we have gone to the roof.
          The good thing about this job is that we have done so much, with so little, for so long that we can do everything with nothing...... which is what is wrong with this job.
          KTF | DTRT

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by MattyS View Post
            Unless youve decided on a trench operation, like this whole thread is about and which you have already stated is a defensive manuever (meaning no members in the fire attack room/area). then, your heat hole is used to "buy time" via the venting it produces.

            It is not always stictly "defensive" or "offensive" as many seem to think. It is possible to have both going on simutainiously. A trench can be used in conjunction with members below pulling with hooks and trying to knock down the fire. The trench would be cut and pulled to prevent the fire from spreading to an un-involved section of the building, while efforts continue on the top floor to open up and knock down the fire. Your first hole would be directly over the fire as part of that effort.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by MattyJ View Post
              It is not always stictly "defensive" or "offensive" as many seem to think. It is possible to have both going on simutainiously. A trench can be used in conjunction with members below pulling with hooks and trying to knock down the fire. The trench would be cut and pulled to prevent the fire from spreading to an un-involved section of the building, while efforts continue on the top floor to open up and knock down the fire. Your first hole would be directly over the fire as part of that effort.
              I agree, and that is how it is practiced here, you are going on the offense by taking a defensive stance and manuever to control the event. I was incorrect when I said there would be no members in the room/area in my other reply, my mistake. When performing a strip, we absolutely have members operating handlines and hooks to attack the overhead. I think we are both operating with the same tactics, but youre just so much damned better with your word choice.
              The good thing about this job is that we have done so much, with so little, for so long that we can do everything with nothing...... which is what is wrong with this job.
              KTF | DTRT

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by MattyS View Post
                Pulling roof material is time consuming and exHausting.....unless youre louvering, dicing, doing pullbacks or doing drop cuts. But hey, you work on my truck company in my dept., so you know exactly what level of training we have, how coordinated we are in our work, or how often we have gone to the roof.
                No I do not work in your company.

                Nor did I question your training, your coordination or how many times you have gone to the roof.

                But I stand by the statement that it is manpower intensive and exhausting work. If YOUR truck company wants to cut two....knock yourselves out.

                The rest of the fire service will cut one and cut it correctly to not warant cutting a second.

                Comment

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