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Half sheep shank knot

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  • boost46
    replied
    thanks guys lot's of info

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  • ADSNWFLD
    replied
    An alternative way is to put a butterfly in the line send the running end through the loop then tighten and secure with half hitches.
    Attached Files

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  • ADSNWFLD
    replied
    OK lets see if this works. The knot we call a half sheep shank with a safety is used to create a barrier or can be used to secure an object from going somewhere.
    First tie off the rope to something substantial then run the line to the object you want to secure (banister in picture)

    Then cross the running end over the middle of the line that is between the two objects

    Make two loops in the line towards the anchor and take a bite over the running end that is lying on the line and into the loops

    Naxt take the running end towards the object you want to secure and tie it off with two half hitches and here you are.
    Attached Files

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  • mtfd89
    replied
    Sheepshank in a reef. Note the modified reef knot (square knot) formed around the center of the sheepshank.
    Attached Files

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  • mtfd89
    replied
    The sheepshank has its uses, as stretch13 notes. I have used the knot frequently for line shortening, weak line "reinforcement", and as a tackle knot. A sheepshank "in a reef" (or "on a reef", or "with a reef") is more stable; but more difficult to tie.

    A sheepshank should not be used without enhancement under alternating load/non-load conditions (see diagram). Also, double half hitches at both ends tend to make the sheepshank more stable.

    Remember, knots are tools in a toolbox. Use the proper tool, use it correctly, and under the proper conditions. And if there is a better tool in the toolbox for the intended use; use it.
    Attached Files

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  • stretch13
    replied
    Originally posted by DonSmithnotTMD View Post
    :: WARNING ACTUAL QUESTION :: Does the line that's tied into the weakened line go back to the weakened line's anchor point or doesn't it matter?

    I was only told that you could join two lines of different diameters. FWIW: In GA this is known as a Beckett Bend.
    We were taught that you used the same line, you just used the sheepshank to relieve the weakened section.

    The becket bend, and double becket bend were used to join two lines of different diameters.

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  • boost46
    replied
    thanks guys you have all been helpful now i know thanks

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  • DonSmithnotTMD
    replied
    Originally posted by stretch13 View Post
    True that the sheepshank shortens the line, but the true use for it that I learned in the Navy, was that it was used to relieve a weakened section of line. If you had a section of line that was weakened from abrasion or whatever, and you couldn't change out the lines, you could tie a sheepshank into the line, and the strain would be taken off the weakened section. With the sheepshank tied properly, you could actually cut the weakened section, and it would not matter.
    :: WARNING ACTUAL QUESTION :: Does the line that's tied into the weakened line go back to the weakened line's anchor point or doesn't it matter?

    I was only told that you could join two lines of different diameters. FWIW: In GA this is known as a Beckett Bend.
    Last edited by DonSmithnotTMD; 02-19-2007, 05:01 PM. Reason: dumbassery like always

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  • Haweater
    replied
    Originally posted by johnny46 View Post
    It costs about ten bucks to have pockets that will hold sheep hoof's sewn onto the front of your boots; then you won't have to bother with tying a rope around them to keep them from running away.
    LMAO, what, you can't take the time to post a link for Texas-velcro-gloves?
    How can you spot a guy who likes Moosehead? Antler marks on his belly



    Edit: Okay, for those of ewe south of the border, Moosehead is a Canadian beer......

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  • johnny46
    replied
    It costs about ten bucks to have pockets that will hold sheep hoof's sewn onto the front of your boots; then you won't have to bother with tying a rope around them to keep them from running away.

    Leave a comment:


  • stretch13
    replied
    True that the sheepshank shortens the line, but the true use for it that I learned in the Navy, was that it was used to relieve a weakened section of line. If you had a section of line that was weakened from abrasion or whatever, and you couldn't change out the lines, you could tie a sheepshank into the line, and the strain would be taken off the weakened section. With the sheepshank tied properly, you could actually cut the weakened section, and it would not matter.

    Leave a comment:


  • MEDIC0372
    replied
    Originally posted by FFFRED View Post
    I use it to shank half of my sheep!

    FTM-PTB
    Does it work on all your sheep or just half your sheep?

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  • t0asty
    replied
    Thanks for the help.

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  • Haweater
    replied
    Originally posted by johnfd86 View Post
    also if someone could help me find a spell check on this forum please let me know.
    Just use the latest version of Firefox and it spell checks as you type. Funny, it didn't let me write Firefox without the capital

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  • johnfd86
    replied
    Originally posted by t0asty View Post
    for some odd reason my browser is checking and telling me when I have spelling errors. It started when I updated firefox1.5 to 2.0. Freaked me out a bit. But on the note of knots. because my explorer post has not told me much about knots yet. What kind of knots do you find the most useful? (so i can learn them). Thanks.

    Toasty, I can't be of much help here because I suspect that most rope techniques are going to be department specific to the type of rope and equipment you have. However if you have access to manilla hemp rope (natural fiber) stick with basic knots like a bowline and clove hitch which are often used for equipment ties. Tecnical rescue has grown tremendously over the years and I would think that most people are using Kern mantle ropes. If you can learn to tie knots like the figure 8, double loop figure 8, inline figure 8, and maybe a tracer knot you will be ahead of the game when you do have a rope class. The key to mastering rope techniques is repition.
    practice, practice and practice.
    Last edited by johnfd86; 02-16-2007, 10:50 AM.

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