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  • Is there a salvage tarp expert here?

    I'm trying to figure out what the "fire resistive/water proof" material that the salvage tarps are coated with is called. Can anyone offer any insight?

  • #2
    Originally posted by Trucker31 View Post
    I'm trying to figure out what the "fire resistive/water proof" material that the salvage tarps are coated with is called. Can anyone offer any insight?
    Vinyl.

    The waterproof salvage covers are simply vinyl coated nylon that is treated with a flame retardant.




    Kevin
    Fire Lieutenant/E.M.T.
    IAFF Local 2339
    K of C 4th Degree
    "LEATHER FOREVER"
    Member I.A.C.O.J.
    http://www.tfdfire.com/
    "Fir na tine"

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    • #3
      I should specify that our tarps are made of canvas. Does this change anything?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Trucker31 View Post
        I should specify that our tarps are made of canvas. Does this change anything?
        Boy are we backwoods....we use tarps from Lowes....LOL!

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        • #5
          Hmmm...don't know what they use on the Canvas for a treatment.

          You may have to call a company that makes them (e-tarps.com ?)

          On the Vinyl discussion, there's also Hypalon which is another synthetic, it's the "nicer" feeling one...that also costs more

          We have everything from 40 y/o Canvas, vinyl, hypalon, down to disposable tarps.
          Last edited by Dalmatian190; 01-25-2007, 11:45 PM.

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          • #6
            A lot of hardware stores carry something from Thompson's(tm)Waterseal that waterproofs canvas.
            I remember a lot of old books about camping which included instructions on how to waterproof your tent but cannot recall the process or chemicals used.

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            • #7
              A company called Iowa American used to sell "fire resistive" salvage covers, but if memory serves me correctly they cost in the $500 range for 14x16. They are no longer in business though, I would check with All Hands Fire Equipment. They are usually in the know.

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              • #8
                There is a former Fire Patrolman on here by the name of Salman or something like that. He is now a fireman in New England somewhere. Hopefully he will see this.

                If I run into any of my Fire Patrol friends who are still around I'll ask them.

                FTM-PTB

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by doughesson View Post
                  A lot of hardware stores carry something from Thompson's(tm)Waterseal that waterproofs canvas.
                  I remember a lot of old books about camping which included instructions on how to waterproof your tent but cannot recall the process or chemicals used.

                  Most of the older canvas waterproofing agents for camping were paraffin based and would probably not be a good idea for salvage covers for obvious reasons. . .
                  ullrichk
                  a.k.a.
                  perfesser

                  a ship in a harbor is safe. . . but that's not what ships are for

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                  • #10
                    I can't remember the name of the stuff, but I've got an old duster (waterproof/brush proof trench coat type thing for those not familiar) that all I had to do to re-waterproof was go down to the western wear store and buy a bottle of stuff for it. It's not the canvas duck stuff, but it'd damn close. Might be worth looking into, but I can't remember for the life of me what it costs.

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                    • #11
                      what the "experts" used in the NY Fire Patrol...haha

                      FFFRED, hey there. Thanks. I will get back to you guys regarding the salvage covers. We used the heavy coated canvas "covers". They were treated and if you used them with bare hands, your hands got itchy, broke out, rashed or whatever. Can't remember what they were treated with, but I'll take them over any type of plastic, nylon "cover" out there. If you truly want to protect contents from the effects of water, smoke and fire (embers etc.), the traditional canvas is more beneficial. And, believe it or not, there was/is a true art in "throwing" covers when you're doing it with the FDNY operating next to you, around you, above you etc. We'd throw 20-30 covers for one business in about 20 minutes with about 4-5 patrolman. A true art in the sense. I miss that job. Keep the NY Fire Patrol in mind. Check out their site. www.fpny123.net I'll get back to you ASAP regarding the covers we used and what they were coated with. Later...

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                      • #12
                        through the lock tool set by Iowa American

                        37truck, speaking about Iowa American...I used to stumble across their booth at the various trade shows. A couple of retired B/C's (FDNY) were the owners. They used to sell a set of "key tools" that were reminiscent of the swiss army knives. It had a shove knife, key tool, pick etc. that all folded up nicely into a literal pocket tool. My buddy, John Feehan (FDNY, former Fire Patrol 3) bought one when I was working with him and dopey me never picked one up. If you or anyone on here knows what I'm talking about, please drop me an email or message with a pic and or somewhere I can find one. That thing was great vs. fiddling around in your pockets for the tools or stowing em' on your helmet.
                        "Fokker Out"...

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                        • #13
                          a response...

                          Here is a response from one of the more senior members of the NY Fire Patrol, and friend of mine...

                          "The covers which we used were made of canvas made by the Atlas Cover Corp.
                          They had a waterproof sealant built into them. The smell was horrible when
                          first used but soon wore off. We treated them ourselves with water proof
                          spray every once in a while.

                          I hope this answers your question. It was not a high tech process. The
                          only drawback which we are exploring is the covers may have been
                          contaminated throughout the years and proper testing was never done which
                          may cause problems to members in the future.

                          I Think the way to go is: heavy duty disposable plastic which the union
                          tried to persuade the Job to no avail. Cuts the process of stripping,
                          washing, and storage. Much cleaner and avoids the above problem."

                          I remember stripping the covers at the various fire scenes, covered with you don't know what. Then we'd fold them the best way possible, into the truck and throw them in the basement for cleaning and then we'd hang em' to dry and then refold them for use. Usually, a few shifts would shared the work especially when their were many covers to wash, hang and fold...I hope this answered your question.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Salman1 View Post
                            37truck, speaking about Iowa American...I used to stumble across their booth at the various trade shows. A couple of retired B/C's (FDNY) were the owners. They used to sell a set of "key tools" that were reminiscent of the swiss army knives. It had a shove knife, key tool, pick etc. that all folded up nicely into a literal pocket tool. My buddy, John Feehan (FDNY, former Fire Patrol 3) bought one when I was working with him and dopey me never picked one up. If you or anyone on here knows what I'm talking about, please drop me an email or message with a pic and or somewhere I can find one. That thing was great vs. fiddling around in your pockets for the tools or stowing em' on your helmet.
                            "Fokker Out"...
                            Bro they closed doors a couple years ago, there is probably a box of the key tools lying around in one of their garages. Your best and only bet is to see if you could get a hold of Marty Vitael. If any knows Rick Fritz from High Point(NC) FD aka. "Mr Tools of the Trade", he might know.

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                            • #15
                              I'll give it a try...

                              Thanks for the info. Great resource. I read Fritz' book. Pretty decent one at that...I figured they were shut down when they weren't at the last few show's I've been to in Pennsylvania the last few years. I'll try to get in touch with him.

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