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Backdraft caught on video

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  • firefighter7160
    replied
    Cool Video

    We had a fire downtown in the 80's that backdraft on 3 of are guys. Knocked them across a four lane street. Crazy stuff. Would sh$t my pants if that happened to me.... Most the videos on YouTube on BackDrafts make good training videos.....

    Leave a comment:


  • FFFRED
    replied
    Originally posted by fireman4949
    Here's a "canned" backdraft.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWL049liK7A

    And here's one I stumbled across that I remember from years ago. This is why we wear PPE!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7Fx4785XAs&NR

    Kevin

    Thanks,
    Now I know how to exclaim "Ohhh Damn" in Sweedish!

    FTM-PTB

    Leave a comment:


  • WaterbryVTfire
    replied
    Originally posted by WaterbryVTfire
    Yes, this is St. Johnsbury, Vt...I am trying to get some info on the fire.
    Here is a link to the write up on the fire bottom of page...

    http://www.stjohnsburyfire.com/history/majorfires.html

    Leave a comment:


  • fireman4949
    replied
    Here's a "canned" backdraft.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kWL049liK7A

    And here's one I stumbled across that I remember from years ago. This is why we wear PPE!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7Fx4785XAs&NR




    Kevin

    Leave a comment:


  • tfpd109
    replied
    Ouch, I bet that hurt a bit. Thanks again 4949! Great clips.

    Leave a comment:


  • fireman4949
    replied
    Originally posted by tfpd109
    Thanks Bro!
    My pleasure.

    Here's a better video of the second link I posted...


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4cQOU...elated&search=




    Kevin

    Leave a comment:


  • tfpd109
    replied

    Thanks Bro!

    Leave a comment:


  • fireman4949
    replied
    Here's a few more...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t1_u-eAq5QU

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NuQG...elated&search=

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y67-ubtSzaY




    Kevin

    Leave a comment:


  • GFDLT1
    replied
    Originally posted by jonnyirons2
    How do i get in contact with this champ guy?
    PM me and I will give you his email address

    Leave a comment:


  • jonnyirons2
    replied
    How do i get in contact with this champ guy?

    Leave a comment:


  • Peetmoss
    replied
    Originally posted by ldgary
    Anybody know how to save this file to a hard drive? I'd like to use it in a training presentation.
    If you can't save it let me know and I will Email it to you.

    Leave a comment:


  • Capt790
    replied
    Originally posted by SPFDRum
    Another notice is it appears they are using fog nozzles in a straight stream fashion. It's amazing how much entrained air one of those can drag into a fire. Could it have contibuted? I don't know, but it's something to think about. But you won't get that air with a smooth bore.
    According to testing done at Rockland County NY Fire Training Center, there is little to no difference in entrained air between a smoothbore and a fog nozzle on straight stream.

    Excerpt from article "Nozzle Tests Prove Fireground Realities" by Jerry Knapp Tim Pillsworth & Christopher Flatley Fire Engineering February 2004:
    PHASE 1 TEST RESULTS

    In phase 1 of our testing program, we designed and set up a test apparatus to capture and measure the airflow caused by the direction of a fire stream into a fire room. A single air balancer for an HVAC system measured airflow. The plan view of the apparatus is shown below.

    As a result of our testing, we were able to measure an air flow into the fire area from both solid bore and combination nozzles (set on straight stream) on 1 3/4-inch attack lines flowing approximately 180 gallons per minute (gpm). From this testing, we concluded the following:


    - A 15/16-inch solid bore nozzle operated at 50-psi nozzle pressure and flowing 180 gpm caused approximately 510 cfm to be moved into the fire area to which the stream was directed. When this nozzle was rotated clockwise, the airflow increased by approximately 40 percent, to 725 cubic feet per minute (cfm).

    - The straight streams produced by fog nozzles using test methods similar to those described above generated almost exactly the same airflow data. After numerous tests, we concluded that the air movement by straight streams (from combination nozzles) and air movement into the fire area from solid bore nozzles was very similar, if not exactly the same.

    - Combination nozzles used in the fog position cause massive air movements into the fire area. Although the quantity of air moved exceeded the measurement capability (2,000 cfm) of our instrument, through testing and researching the literature, we believe that a typical 1 3/4-inch fog line flowing 150 to 180 gpm will move 6,000 to 10,000 cfm of air into the fire area. Recall that a typical electric fire service fan will move 10,000 cfm.
    True, the testing was done with 1 3/4" handlines but I would think there would be similar results with a 2 1/2" line or monitor.

    Personally, my preference is smoothbore tips on a 2 1/2" line for easier manuevering at the lower required nozzle pressure and on a monitor or deck gun for ease of operation and maintenance when compared to an automatic. I'm stuck with combos on our 1 3/4" lines and as long as they're kept on straight stream is not much of an issue especially with the newer lower pressure nozzles.
    Last edited by Capt790; 12-02-2006, 10:34 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • SPFDRum
    replied
    Another notice is it appears they are using fog nozzles in a straight stream fashion. It's amazing how much entrained air one of those can drag into a fire. Could it have contibuted? I don't know, but it's something to think about. But you won't get that air with a smooth bore.

    Leave a comment:


  • FFFRED
    replied
    Originally posted by firepics
    If my eyes are right, the smoke sucking back into the building on the right side of the building, one of the indicators of a backdraft/smoke explosion???
    I didn't notice that before.

    I was thinking of what Chief Dunn speaks of when he mentions setting up a multi-versal or a handline in the street in front of a fire such as this. Because of the danger of Backdraft and because of collasping walls/parapets/marquees...etc. He suggests using a flanking position to either side of the occupancy involved in fire.

    While the stream isn't as effective...it is much safer as we all can see in the above video.

    FTM-PTB

    Leave a comment:


  • WaterbryVTfire
    replied
    Originally posted by Steamer
    Nope; not Ohio signs. Those signs are standard Federal Highway signs. US Route 2 and US Route 5. Route 5 runs North/South while Route 2 runs East/West. The only place these two highways cross is in St. Johnsbury, Vermont. From the directions on the street signs, my guess is that we are seeing a fire that occured on Railroad Street between Eastern Avenue and Portland Street.

    I love a good mystery.
    Yes, this is St. Johnsbury, Vt...I am trying to get some info on the fire.

    Leave a comment:

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