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Hydrant cap chains

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  • CaptOldTimer
    replied
    Originally posted by kevmar28 View Post
    Thank you for your insightful input. Now re-read my post. THE BUSHINGS FAILED. The threaded piping flew right out with the cap. Cause? The bolts were sheared by someone who previously tightened the cap too much and sheared them off. If you could kindly explain to me how adding a gate valve to the end of it will prevent it from flying off, I am all ears. With regards to your opinion, keep it. I get all the water I need out of a LDH hose. If the fire needs more water than I can provide, then it comes from another engine, with another hydrant. That whole "don't put all your eggs in one basket" mentality. The city I protect is very good with regards to hydrant placement, so distance is never a concern.


    I was wondering about the "BOLTS BEING SHEARED OFF". What bolts are you talking about?? The bolts that holds the body of the hydrant to the bonnet or the extreme lower part of the hydrant?? I am puzzled as to what you are referring too as the BOLTS!


    As far as the chains, we always straighten them out and made sure that the ring around and behind the pentagon cap end was straight so it could get hung up.

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  • MTPLEASANTFF6
    replied
    In the city and county (I am in the county vol dept). we do not have chains on hydrants.

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  • DetroitFF
    replied
    I've never seen anyone cut the chains. We inspect hydrants monthly from October through March. As others have mentioned, the chains can get tangled, or gummed up by paint, or rusted. When we inspect the hydrants we'll try to get the chains straightened out too. Like someone else mentioned, we only put the cap back on a turn or two to make it easier for the FEO at a fire.

    We actually use the chains as a visual aid for hydrant inspection. If a hydrant is dry when we check it, we cross the chains over the ports. That way, the next month we know it wasn't a leaker during the previous inspection. Of course, we have our fair share of missing chains and missing caps.

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  • Dalmatian190
    replied
    I never paid any attention to the chains (we have a whopping 11 public hydrants and four or so yard hydrants in my district) until this thread.

    Most chains are snapped

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  • MEDIC0372
    replied
    Originally posted by ChicagoFF View Post
    Our policy is also for engines to get their own hydrant but we also gate them in case an emergency arises that requires that hydrant to supply two engines. Talk about putting all your eggs in your one working hydrant in the hopes that the others are not frozen or broken........... What if THE BUSHINGS FAILED on your second engines hydrant and the next two are frozen? A gate valve might not seem like such a bad idea then.
    That is a great idea...we do that whenever we hit a hydrant. I do remember one night we had a good worker and the back-up engine could not find an operational hydrant. That does NOT happen much here but it was about 0 degrees so they had to hook into our primary hydtant via the gate. Glad we had it...

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  • SSHANK42
    replied
    If a hydrant cap chain sticks while I'm at the hydrant you won't have to worry about it the second time.

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  • ChicagoFF
    replied
    Originally posted by kevmar28 View Post
    Yes, please. That would be great.
    PM me your email address....

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  • kevmar28
    replied
    Originally posted by ChicagoFF View Post
    Still want that high rise info?
    Yes, please. That would be great.

    Leave a comment:


  • BMAIGM
    replied
    Originally posted by VinnieB View Post
    When we are out doing hydrants or ever come across a chain on a run...we break it. As chauff said, the chain impeeds quick removal of the cap. We also only put the 4" cap (if there is one) back on with only a few turns...same reasoning...when I get to the hydrant, I should only have to give it a quick hand over hand twist and the thing should fall off. I can't speak for the rest of my job, but this is what my company does.
    i know the engine in my house does this as well. the truck will too depending on who's working, usually if there's a former engine guy, they get cut. bottomline- they do nothing but delay the ECC.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChicagoFF
    replied
    Originally posted by kevmar28 View Post
    Anything you can provide would be most beneficial. My city is 90% single family residential with some limited, but rapidly expanding commercial structures. I would like to get tactical opinions, SOPs, whatever I can get to help in the development of our training and SOPs. And yes, I totally agree, the gate valve is there in case I need it. I've never had to use it for that situation, but of course I understand that there is always a possibility of that happening.
    Still want that high rise info?

    Leave a comment:


  • tfpd109
    replied
    Where I'm from, we don't cut the chains unless they are too short. Sometimes they are so short you cant hardly get the caps off. It's pretty simple, in the way, cut them, if not, leave them.

    Leave a comment:


  • firemanmikey
    replied
    Where i'm from in Alberta, Canada we tend to get out fair share of snow, and we too teach the rookies to put the caps in the bag as soon as they remove them from the hydrant. When they don't , we make the rookie who dropped them in the snow find them and dig them out. As for chains, I think we don't have any on our hydrants. We don't have any problem with the theft of caps and then shoving junk down the discharges. This only happens on the buildings with FDC's.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • kevmar28
    replied
    Thank you, this is exactly the type of stuff I am looking for.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChicagoFF
    replied
    http://www.iaff-local2.org/

    Look under the Vice Presidents page and you will find a few notes from last years high rise conference. It's not much but it's something to read while I try and find a copy of the order.

    Leave a comment:


  • kevmar28
    replied
    Originally posted by ChicagoFF
    Kevmar28 - I will look around for a copy of our high rise order if you want, but I'm not sure how much help it will be (unless you want to dispatch a helicopter for a silly project fire! - which we were doing when it came into effect.) It all turned into a confusing mess after the 69 W. Washington fire.
    Anything you can provide would be most beneficial. My city is 90% single family residential with some limited, but rapidly expanding commercial structures. I would like to get tactical opinions, SOPs, whatever I can get to help in the development of our training and SOPs. And yes, I totally agree, the gate valve is there in case I need it. I've never had to use it for that situation, but of course I understand that there is always a possibility of that happening.

    Leave a comment:

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