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  • Forcing entry with a hoseline

    I am looking at a textbook i have and it says the following paragraph.

    The value of a charged hose line to force entry or effect ventilation should be remembered. When locked doors are encountered, they can be forced open by putting the nozzle against the door at the level of the lock, straightening the hose line , and pushing it against the door. The damage is not great and the procedure is safe. A straight stream or solid stream at ordinary pressure can break window glass and provide ventilation-a method that is quick and can reach many windows in a short time.

    I understand the ventilation part of things but I fail to understand the entry part. Can anyone help me out with this deal?
    It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog.

  • #2
    Must be running a fog nozzle. I can't see trying to "straighten" a line with a SB. Kinda like pushing cooked spaghetti. I know I'd like to bash a few automatic nozzles into a door, so we could replace them cheaper with better weapons.

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    • #3
      mcfd45:

      I believe what the textbook said was "hold the pipe, turn and face opposite of the door, and mule kick directly underneath the knob with your boot. Guaranteed to work 80%-90% of the time on residential doors.".....or at least that is how I interpreted it.

      rfd599
      www.IllinoisFireStore.com

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      • #4
        In my brief experience,I've never heard of using a hoseline to force a door.We were always taught to carry a hallagan and flathead axe to force doors we found in the way.
        Wouldn't pushing the nozzle against the door invoke Sir Isaac Newton's Third Law of Motion"...any action will have an equal and opposite reaction"?That means if you push a nozzle against a door and open the bail,you would be pushed back away from the door,wouldn't you?

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mcfd45
          I am looking at a textbook i have and it says the following paragraph.
          Could you please let us know which texbook this was??? It sounds like something that I would not do personally!!!!
          Just someone trying to help! (And by the way....Thanks for YOUR help!)

          Aggressive does not have to equal stupid.

          ** "The comments made here are this person's views and possibly that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

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          • #6
            Come on thats what they make forcible entry tools for, and why would you MULE kick a door to force it open, what about control of the door, 80 90% of the time it works. How about a hydra ram or hallagan tool 100% of the time .I'm sorry, as an officer I would not teach nor allow my crew to perform in that manner. I'm with firenut name that book!!!!!. STAY SAFE

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            • #7
              The textbook is "Firefighting Principles and Practices" by William E. Clark. 2nd edition page 274. No pictures, nothing, just the above paragraph. I understand the mule kick thing I wear a size 13 so it might help. Maybe like a battering ram? I don't think they mean to open the bail.
              It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog.

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              • #8
                Veeeeeryy interesting....

                But I wouldn't do it.

                Having different tools in your mental toolbox is always a good thing, so keep the info in your head, but I'd use it as a last resort.

                Bring the irons.

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                • #9
                  i am taking college courses in fire science with meridian cc and i have that same book. i took a look and there it was, page 274 in the "engine company operations" chapter. i dont understand it either.
                  2009 Warren County Firefighter of the Year

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                  • #10
                    I don't think they are suggesting using the water stream, as that would be a recipe for a serious kick in the ***, but rather the rigid hose line with the nozzle as the battering ram.

                    There is no reason it wouldn't work, as the hose is both heavy and rigid if applied straight and level with a rapid motion.

                    I don't know that I would want my guys using a new $1500.00 automatic to do it though (at least when there is a haligan on the truck). But hey, another tool in the box...
                    Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

                    IACOJ

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                    • #11
                      Ok, how many 2 man nozzle teams carry FE tools?
                      "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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                      • #12
                        Do carry fe or should carry fe? We usually throw an axe in the scba belt, its not a complete set, but its a start.

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                        • #13
                          why wouldn't you carry tools with you. once you get the fire knockeddown you need to start overhaul and in my mind the halligan is the best overhaul tool i have ever used.
                          J
                          It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog.

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                          • #14
                            why wouldn't you carry tools with you.
                            Ok, guess I should quantify my question... For those that operate as Engine company and Truck company, how many 2 man nozzle teams carry FE tools?

                            My engine company handles the hoseline, they don't force entry, they don't use hooks to overhaul, they don't use saws to open things up....that is truck company work. On the engine company, nozzle man has the nozzle. Backup man backs him up. There is also a door man and a control man. Their main job is the handline. FE, ventilation, search, rescue, etc. is all part of the Truck company job. Depending on who it is, you might find the engine company officer with a pry-axe.

                            IF you don't operate this way, then I could see your nozzle team carrying tools, but it's got to be difficult and slow them down in moving a handline while carrying so much. But hey, if it works for you, have at it.


                            We usually throw an axe in the scba belt
                            That is a doable option.
                            "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

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                            • #15
                              I see your point with the truck company. most here are suburban departments without set companies.
                              It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog.

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