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Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

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  • #91
    Not quite sure what your getting at. But, you should be at full throttle prior to intoducing the saw to the material being cut. Allow the saw to do the work, forcing it might "bog" the saw down, thus slowing your cut and maybe freezing the chain requiring you to back off re-throttle and then cut again.
    Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

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    • #92
      Originally posted by Skwerl530
      Uh I mean manufactured house. Use the hook on a drywall hook to rip the siding then tear it back with said hook. If there is paneling on the inside push it in with the blunt bit of an axe. Don't try to cut it with the blade, it will take forever. Just "jab" it with the head of the axe where the paneling is nailed to the wall.

      For those that don't know, this is a drywall hook:
      http://www.emc4rescue.com/catalogs/e...d/it010028.htm

      No I don't sell them this was just the 1st picture I found.

      We just got a couple of these tools...MAN are they nice...can make some quick work of overhaul
      MABAS Div. 45

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      • #93
        Originally posted by Captain5505
        Sawsall or window saw both will produce fine dust. Use what you use everyday " Shaving Cream " run a bead of this around the window before cutting, this traps all the dust on the side that the rescuer is on. Try it before ya knock it.

        At my former job we used shaving cream when cutting or drilling into asbestos floor tiles. It would catch a lot of the bad stuff. I have never tried it on a window, but it would be great.

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        • #94
          nozzleman in a stairway?

          Hey, anyone know a good trick for keeping a handline from making you slide down the stairs when trying to hold a good position? I imagine someone will say stay at the bottom. duh I mean when that's not a great option, like in a stairway that turns.

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          • #95
            Originally posted by rmhinkle
            Hey, anyone know a good trick for keeping a handline from making you slide down the stairs when trying to hold a good position? I imagine someone will say stay at the bottom. duh I mean when that's not a great option, like in a stairway that turns.

            Could you clarify this. Do you mean....stretch up to the 5th floor, for a fire...or....charging the line...then advancing up to the 5th floor....or maybe.....stay at the floor below...and lob water in?

            Basically the "trick" to maintaining the hose line, position and fluid momentum...is....

            A GOOD BACK UP MAN. He is to take the weight of the line....and make life for the Nozzleman easy.
            IACOJ Member

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            • #96
              Originally posted by VinnieB
              A GOOD BACK UP MAN. He is to take the weight of the line....and make life for the Nozzleman easy.
              And a smooth bore definitely helps too
              "Train as if your life depends on it"
              Always Remember *343*

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              • #97
                Clarification

                Hey, yeah I just meant when you open the bale what's the best position to stay in to keep the hose from wanting to slide down the stairway. I know you're kinda fighting gravity here, and it's just one of those tough spots. I was just seeing if anyone had some tricks. No big deal if no one has an answer.

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                • #98
                  The best position to place the hose to keep it from sliding back is in the hands of a good back up man. He should be taking most of the brunt while the tip man directs the stream. If youre fighting for control of the tip youre not directing the stream like you should.
                  Just another one of the 99%ers looking up.

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                  • #99
                    tricks and ?s

                    when overhauling the top floor in a house and asked to poke your head in the attic/cockloft if you see cobwebs or spider webs don't bother up there anymore they vaporise very quickly at a very low temp.
                    trying to get of the roof in a pinch carry 40' of webbing with a caribiner and a halligan up with you. take the biiner and put it in the spkie end and then slam it into the roof. wrap the webbing down the handle and off the roof you go.
                    quick question. im a mechanic and i know we are alway tod not to use Cheater bars (pieces of pipe you slip on the handle of a wrench, ratchet, breaker bar) because the tool cant handle the extra load on it. if yo put 2 halligans together isn't that the same type of thing? i have no doubt that it works but is it the safe thing to be telling people about?
                    It's not the size of the dog in the fight, it's the size of the fight in the dog.

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                    • If you are using a hurst tool with a manifold (allows you to attach up to three pieces of equipment) and while in the process of connecting the hoses together you cannot get a hose to connect due to built up pressure in the line (happens when someone pressurizes the system before both the male and female are connected, the male side will not lock into the female; some call it a dead-head) a simple and safe way to solve this is to throw the hurst generator into dump, then the manifold, and then place the manifold back into pressure (leave the generator in dump). DUMP, DUMP, PRESSURE. This will releave the pressure throughout the system allowing you to place the hoses together. After, place the generator back into pressue and continue.
                      Another way is to throw the system into dump and press the male end into the ground (on a clean rag to avoid contamination <dirt and sand>). This will take some weight and will not be as easy as the above mentioned.

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                      • Keep a roll of duct tape and a permanent marker in the compartment nearest to the pump panel. When you have mutiple lines off the rig with members of different companies taking the lines, rip off a piece of duct tape, put it on the panel just under the valve control or gauge and mark the company's ID on it. That way, when a company calls for more pressure or to have a line shut down, you won't shut down the wrong one by mistake.
                        ‎"The education of a firefighter and the continued education of a firefighter is what makes "real" firefighters. Continuous skill development is the core of progressive firefighting. We learn by doing and doing it again and again, both on the training ground and the fireground."
                        Lt. Ray McCormack, FDNY

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                        • I learned in a Truckie class that sometimes, when your doing what you have to do, and no one is available, you can set up your ladder, and drive the spike of the halligan in the ground tight up against the butt of the ladder to hold it down.
                          Just know, I chose my own fate. I drove by the fork in the road and went straight.

                          Originally posted by FlyingKiwi
                          Go put your pussy 2 1/2" lines away kiddies.

                          Originally posted by Explorer343

                          By the way KEEPBACK200FEET, you're so dramatic!

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                          • Originally posted by CaptainGonzo
                            Keep a roll of duct tape and a permanent marker in the compartment nearest to the pump panel. When you have mutiple lines off the rig with members of different companies taking the lines, rip off a piece of duct tape, put it on the panel just under the valve control or gauge and mark the company's ID on it. That way, when a company calls for more pressure or to have a line shut down, you won't shut down the wrong one by mistake.
                            You can also use an eraseable marker, the kind you use on a white board, and write on the stainless steel next to each pump gauge. You can put the number of the engine that is using that line, what floor, etc... It wipes off with a dry towel, rag, etc..

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                            • When forced to bail out of an upper story window on a rope, instead of trying to hold a tool in the corner of the window as an anchor while you bail, if the wall next to the window is sheetrock, simply ram the head of your tool through the 'rock, tie your escape line to the tool, then drop the handle down into the hole. This holds the tool in place for you.

                              Also, if the outer wall is relatively flimsy, just drive something all the way through it, and tie your bailout line around the windowframe and adjoining studs through the hole.

                              Everyone should know the airpack body rappel as well: Hold your line in one hand, pass it between your bottle and frame, and hold the running end up against your chest. Bail. The friction your pack creates on the rope will slow your descent.

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                              • Stick in the mud

                                KEEPBACK200FEET: I learned in a Truckie class that sometimes, when your doing what you have to do, and no one is available, you can set up your ladder, and drive the spike of the halligan in the ground tight up against the butt of the ladder to hold it down.

                                I'f I'm that strapped for manpower I definitely don't want my partner (the Halligan) stuck in the mud just for some good ladder footing. If the ground is soft enough to drive the halligan into, drive the butt of the ladder into it instead. If you have the type of ladder that has the large feet or "paws" on it, they should be still able to be dug in if flipped into the up position.

                                If I am missing the point here and it still is necessary to foot the ladder, I would utilize one of those straight prybars, a picket, or a crowbar.

                                The halligan is much too useful to be a "stick in the mud" on the fireground.

                                PS- Let's bring back the Pick head Axe battles again...they were great! I've never had my 8lb pickhead axe be afraid of heights or not start for me, but I still sleep with my halligan!

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