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Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

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  • Gx7E10
    replied
    Originally posted by NDeMarse
    Hardwood floors are easy enough. Pike through the floor then pry backwards on the adz (it is it's own fulcrum) to rip up a board. Move to a joist and slide the pike under the floor and pull towards the adz using the joist as a fulcrum. I have never really found a need to rip up a hardwood floor at a fire. The drills that I have attended in case it was needed, the halligan works great. I have used both tools though

    Chopping a windshild can be done with the short strokes using the forked end. I guess it would be faster to do with an axe, so you might have me here. Then again, we have to get the posts cut, so we might have some time to do it with the forks or go get the windshield saw or saw-zall.

    I don't cut peaked roofs, so I am not up there to use either tool. I have used a pick-axe on a peaked roof prior to my career here, and I prefer either a maul, sledge or the back of the flathead axe to bash though. A halligan can be used, use the corner of the tool between the adz and the pike end. Opens up a larger area, but it will be more work since it is lighter.

    I do think it is easier to punch out a trunk lock with a halligan. The shorter tool allows for better accuracy if you are doing a 1 man swing. If you are not doing a 1 man operation (usually there are plenty of FFs looking for work at autos) you have a strike surface on the other side of the point so it can be driven through the lock.

    I think it is also easier to peel a auto hood back. Drive the pike into the hood and pry backwards over the adz (just like on the wood floor) and it will open up a large corner of the hood.

    However, my choice for getting under the hood at an auto fire is to break out the front grill (obviously after the main body of fire is knocked down), find the hood release cord, put the wire between the forks and twist several times to the right. This will operate the hood release just like if you pulled it from the interior. Open the hood and chock it open. After that, I have heard differing opinions, but I've always used the fork end to pry the terminals off of the battery. I have never heard of anyone being zapped, but I suppose it could happen.

    I've been arguing pickhead vs halligan for awhile brother! Don't get me wrong, I love tradition. If I had to chose 1 tool to bring in to a burning building for versatility it would definately be a halligan tool over a pickhead.

    Don't mistake my dislike of the pick-head axe as a bash on your department or tools. You guys work great with pickheads and there are several members that really know the capabilities of the tool. This has stirred quite a bit of discussion on the different tasks that can be accomplished with both tools. Nice job!
    Isn't a halligan a prying tool?

    Leave a comment:


  • CAPPYY
    replied
    I feel that its alot safer than havin someone hold the door handle up with their hand in case the door pops with any force. It works for us.

    Leave a comment:


  • firefight99
    replied
    Cool.
    I know having the latch open helps, that sounds like a good trick.

    Leave a comment:


  • CAPPYY
    replied
    Tennis ball

    We use the tennis ball in case its just fluids down and we want to play a game of catch(insert smiley face here if I could figure the damn thing out).

    Seriously...One tennis ball, wrapped with duct tape for a better grip and forced under the door handle of the door you are trying to pop. Now with the spreaders forcing the door at the latch, the ball helps the door to pop alot quicker because it keeps the latch in the opened position.

    Leave a comment:


  • firefight99
    replied
    Originally posted by CaptainGonzo
    I have seen tennis balls used to cover the ends of the A pillars that are cut.

    gotcha. i've seen sections of old 5" hose, no tennis balls.

    Leave a comment:


  • CaptainGonzo
    replied
    I have seen tennis balls used to cover the ends of the A pillars that are cut.

    Leave a comment:


  • firefight99
    replied
    cappyy: what is the tennis ball for in your mva box?
    i like the idea of having everything together, especially all the smaller items.

    Leave a comment:


  • CAPPYY
    replied
    Tricks

    For MVA's I have set up a small plastic toolbox and marked it the "Quick attack box". It is on our rescue and contains all the little items you need at most MVA's. Window punch, duct tape, linemans plyers for removing battery terminals or cutting cables, shave cream, tennis ball, screwdriver for inflator hunting, piece of webbing to secure doors, seatbelt cutters, box knife, and probably an item or two I cant think of right now. This saves my guys from havin to carry this stuff in their pockets and risking injury and saves us from havin to make a million trips back to the rescue. We set the box at the base of the windshield, on the hood for all to dig into.

    Leave a comment:


  • PattyV
    replied
    do your chin strap up on your helmet. it might be annoying having to unbuckle the thing when you take your mask off, but it is more than worth the risk.

    Leave a comment:


  • NDeMarse
    replied
    Originally posted by PFDTruck18
    I also like to remind guys that when performing vertical ventilation and you take out a natural opening such as a skylight open the walls around the inside, just dont break the glass. It will (should) vent the the cockloft before you get your hole cut.
    Sorry guys, one more to expand on PFDTruck18's post. Don't forget to push down the draftstop (glass or plastic sheet below the skylight). If you don't push this down or break it with the hook, you won't vent the stairway or interior. These are very common!

    Leave a comment:


  • NDeMarse
    replied
    Originally posted by PFDTruck18
    I also like to remind guys that when performing vertical ventilation and you take out a natural opening such as a skylight open the walls around the inside, just dont break the glass. It will (should) vent the the cockloft before you get your hole cut.
    Great point. Take the returns (walls of the skylight and scuttle). You have to watch what you are doing though, if you take the returns remote from the fire area, you could pull the fire through the cockloft towards your hole.

    Great tip!

    Leave a comment:


  • cdemarse
    replied
    Every good truckie has a handlight...or two...or three

    Leave a comment:


  • Bones42
    replied
    Thanks MattyJ, that's what I thought, just wanted to be sure.

    PFD... we teach that (closed eyes) during basic training now. Took a little bit, but had some of the "older" guys try it. Made believers of them.

    Leave a comment:


  • PFDTruck18
    replied
    As soon as I read the post from nutz I took it as ballbusting. Probably a guy from his station or neighboring found him posting and decided it was time for alittle busting of the balls.

    Leave a comment:


  • PFDTruck18
    replied
    When searching in dense smoke I like to close my eyes. You cant see anyway and it takes my mind off of "trying" to see and seems to raise my awareness of touch and sound. Of course you should open them every now and then to make sure the higher heat your crawling into is actual fire.

    I also like to remind guys that when performing vertical ventilation and you take out a natural opening such as a skylight open the walls around the inside, just dont break the glass. It will (should) vent the the cockloft before you get your hole cut.

    I also like to knock out the banister in the hallways but not for relief of bottlenecks but for faster egress should you need it.

    Carry more than one tool, thats why they make belts.

    Leave a comment:

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