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Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

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  • Firehouse_Chick
    replied
    Originally posted by NDeMarse View Post
    Nice thread Vinnie. This should be good!

    I can go on all day on stuff like this!

    - When operating any line as a nozzle FF keep the nozzle out in front of you at least 3 feet. It should be just in reach so you can operate the bale of the nozzle. This makes it easier to operate the line. It is easier to bend the nozzle around a corner to hit fire or if there is fire over your head you don't have to do a triple lindy backflip to hit it. Just point and aim and it goes out
    lol nameless, your humor is appreciated.

    a good video which is done by the superb Lt. McCormack can be found here:http://bcove.me/fa6kuk1b (link is safe and can be found on urbanff: http://www.urbanfirefighter.com/index.html)

    It deals with the "bolded part" of the above quote.....creating a "bow" to reach the stream behind yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • nameless
    replied
    do your company a favor and get a nozzle with a pistol grip. The handle is very useful.

    Leave a comment:


  • Firehouse_Chick
    replied
    Originally posted by NDeMarse View Post
    Nice thread Vinnie. This should be good!

    I can go on all day on stuff like this!

    - When operating any line as a nozzle FF keep the nozzle out in front of you at least 3 feet. It should be just in reach so you can operate the bale of the nozzle. This makes it easier to operate the line. It is easier to bend the nozzle around a corner to hit fire or if there is fire over your head you don't have to do a triple lindy backflip to hit it. Just point and aim and it goes out.

    - Do yourself and your company a favor and saw off the pistol grip so you don't get stuck with the nozzle in your chest and unable to operate it without wrestling the line and overworking yourself.


    - When adding a length to a short-stretch or preconnect (remember preconnects can't hit everything) ALWAYS add it from the supply (engine or stand-pipe) side. It is much faster and easier to add it when done this way. It is usually the Engine Chauffeur that is adding it anyway, and that is his position.

    - ALWAYS FLUSH THE HYDRANT OR STAND-PIPE. THIS ISN'T A TIP, IT'S A MUST, BUT YET FFs STILL DON'T DO IT! Why hook up if you don't know if it is going to work?

    - If operating with no backup FF. Situate yourself on a wall before you open the line. Let the nozzle reaction be absorbed by the wall.

    - If operating with no backup FF. Put a knee on the hose line about 5 feet back from the nozzle before you open the nozzle. The nozzle reaction should be transmitted to the floor.

    - When washing down. Whoever is overhaulling, have them pull ALL of the ceilings and ALL of the walls that need to be pulled. Then have them LEAVE the room. Move to one corner of the room and operate the line soaking all of the area that needs to be covered. Shut down the line, and move to the opposite corner and do the same thing. Move on to the next room and do the same until overhaul is complete. This doesn't allow any part of the opened up area to not be touched by water.

    - In hallways, to avoid cluttering make large loops of hose on the wall (about 5'-6' high) right outside the fire apartment on the opposite wall. Gravity will allow the hose to feed to the nozzle team. When the loops start to go away, feed more hose to the loop or make another one.

    - If you are operating with a solid stream (smooth-bore) line and need to perform hydraulic ventilation. Spin off the outside tip (AND PUT IT IN YOUR POCKET), move to a window and crack the nozzle 1/2 way. It is not as effecient as a fog nozzle for hydraulic ventilation but it works great. You can also leave the tip on and crack the nozzle 1/2 way and that works too. I personally don't like fog nozzles for interior fire attack, and most advocates of fog nozzles use the "well I can't vent with a solid stream nozzle!" Throw this at them and see what they say. Like I said, it takes a little longer, but we are in a slow-down situation at that point. There is no need to "hurry up and get the smoke out of here" once you have it knocked down.

    - If operating as the back-up FF. Get right on the nozzle FFs back. There should be NO space between you and the nozzle FF. When the line is open there should be constant pressure on the nozzle FF so that the only thing that they are doing is pointing the stream. I have seen a backup FF up to 5' behind the nozzle FF. You are doing no good to anyone there. The back-up FF should also be giving the nozzle FF positive encouragement. Phrases like "keep going", "good job", "keep moving in" do A TON for a new or even the experienced firefighter in a fire. Remember, you are there to back them up physically and mentally!

    I'll throw more down later!
    ^^^I love this old thread! been enjoying reading some of the tips and tricks getting passed along.

    Fyredup disagreed a little while ago in one of my threads about the "bolded part" of the above quote. Very cool to read some additional feedback on this and see it resonated by another poster.

    What are some other tricks youse all have learned on the job? pass it on... hope to hear some additional stuff, and see a good thread like this continue on.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lewiston2Capt
    replied
    Originally posted by doughesson
    On my old department,we'd keep a set of tools in the engineer's compartment (same place yours is described as being,left side,No.1 compartment)and the hydrant bag strapped to a 6' loop of 5" line in the hosebed.Either way,if they're needed everyone knows where a set is and the hydrant guy can pull the line and be able to dress the hydrant as soon as he gets to it.
    In it is a threaded Storz adapter,a 2 1/2" gate valve and of course a hydrant wrench.
    I would put a rubber mallet or a bowling pin in there to tighten down the threaded to stortz adapter.

    Leave a comment:


  • doughesson
    replied
    Originally posted by PFDTruck18
    To answer your question, we keep our hydrant bags in the compartment directly to the rear of the pump panel. Makes it easy for the driver to grab after he drops the tank and heads to the rear to stretch a supply line.
    On my old department,we'd keep a set of tools in the engineer's compartment (same place yours is described as being,left side,No.1 compartment)and the hydrant bag strapped to a 6' loop of 5" line in the hosebed.Either way,if they're needed everyone knows where a set is and the hydrant guy can pull the line and be able to dress the hydrant as soon as he gets to it.
    In it is a threaded Storz adapter,a 2 1/2" gate valve and of course a hydrant wrench.

    Leave a comment:


  • 38ffems
    replied
    how about basic free stuff you can throw in your gear. For instance, a golf ball or two for venting those windows that need to go now and can't be reached. Golf tee's for taking care of those small leaks, and a big bertha driver in the cab so when things get slow you can work on your game! I keep small wedges for sprinkler heads that are made out of scrap from strapping. I also keep a couple larger wedges from like 2 by 4 scraps these work great for chocking doors open plus there are literally hundreds of them at most work sites so you can leave in the building and not worry about losing money. Door markers, those plastic door hangers. Webbing, extra flashlight, medical gloves in film containers so they dont get wet or whatever. Finally plastic Zip-ties and a window punch. This sounds like a lot but it weighs almost nothing and is kept in my jacket. I am sure im missing some stuff. Most of this stuff i learned to keep either through trainings or just me getting frustrated on a scene. Im sure someone already said it but a inflatable ball in pump compartment works great when drafting in shallow water, stops the suction funnel from prevent you from getting good draft.

    Leave a comment:


  • aneff3904
    replied
    Oh yes I am called the sarcastic master at my department, and no harm taken. I like the kicthen bannter and the sh** given back and forth.

    I was being serious about your post, on a recent fire I removed the banister post because like you said to ease egress. My battalion asked me why I removed the posts and where I had learned it? I told him from a old truckie and then I told him why, he was a little impressed.
    So thanks again.

    I would also like to add that any of you smoke eaters out there keep posting, we have a retired FDNY chief that retired in the area, we asked him in all of his years what has been the greatest invention in the fire service? His reply "SCBA" he started in 1921 and retired in 1962 and past away several years ago. He also said that he had to buy his own helmet the cost was 25$ a months pay. Sure have come along way.

    Leave a comment:


  • PFDTruck18
    replied
    Originally posted by aneff3904
    Thanks,
    I would like to thank PFDTruck18 for hosting the latest web cast on sentence structure and correct use of the English language. It’s perfect people like him that makes people go on random shooting spree, because we all now how formal the threads are on Firehouse. Com.

    I would also like to thank him for the input on this particular thread those tried and true tactics that he has shared. I’m glad your taking liking to the ball busting on me I guess I will just weather the storm.
    It was a joke my friend. Trust me, Im far from a perfect writer. Typical kitchen table banter. Your correction of my post was the kicker and made it all that more funny. Relax brother, no harm intended.

    To answer your question, we keep our hydrant bags in the compartment directly to the rear of the pump panel. Makes it easy for the driver to grab after he drops the tank and heads to the rear to stretch a supply line.

    Leave a comment:


  • PGPipeMan
    replied
    we have a hydrant wrench looped into a rope on our 3 inch supply line.

    Because we drop a line at the hydrant and the next in pumper picks it up.

    Leave a comment:


  • MG3610
    replied
    keep a towel in your engineers compartment. When you've got a poor connection on your suction inlet or a discharge line, drape the towel over it to cause all the water spray to drool onto the ground instead of all over your panel and you.

    Leave a comment:


  • aneff3904
    replied
    Thanks

    Thanks,
    I would like to thank PFDTruck18 for hosting the latest web cast on sentence structure and correct use of the English language. It’s perfect people like him that makes people go on random shooting spree, because we all now how formal the threads are on Firehouse. Com.

    I would also like to thank him for the input on this particular thread those tried and true tactics that he has shared. I’m glad your taking liking to the ball busting on me I guess I will just weather the storm.

    Leave a comment:


  • PFDTruck18
    replied
    Originally posted by aneff3904
    We keep are hydrant bags connected to the end of are LDH, well the problem is that the bags are heavy and sitting at the top of the truck. We tried keeping them on the tailboard but looks like the poo. So we leave them on top and have a short peice of hose strap tied to the handles, now we can pull the bag from the ground and throw the strap over are shoulder to carry to the hydrant and wrap around the hydrant.Works great.

    Great thread good ideas.

    Work smarter not harder!
    Man, are you slow or what?

    Try using "our" and not "are" in many of the sentences in your above quote.

    So slow he didnt even get it!

    Just a jab.

    Leave a comment:


  • AC1503
    replied
    The dry erase marker will write on the face of the gauge very well too. It can also be used to write the address of the run on the officer's door window or a small dry erase board fastened to the dash.
    Last edited by AC1503; 07-08-2006, 12:59 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • cdemarse
    replied
    Originally posted by aneff3904
    Same here, not as much stuff because all hydrants in my area are the same thread.


    Hydrant wrench
    Gate valve
    6" fire thread to stortz
    Spanner wrenchs
    which you can put into a bag therefore making a Hydrant bag

    Leave a comment:


  • aneff3904
    replied
    Same here, not as much stuff because all hydrants in my area are the same thread.


    Hydrant wrench
    Gate valve
    6" fire thread to stortz
    Spanner wrenchs

    Leave a comment:

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