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Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

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  • nbfcfireman
    replied
    for fires in warehouses or even houses it is good to keep a a few golf balls in your pocket. If you get dissoriented through one of them ahead of you, listen for the sound. easiest in a warehouse, most have metal walls, loud bang!!if you go a while and still havent hit a wall, throw another!!

    Leave a comment:


  • firefiftyfive
    replied
    Another Haligan tip:
    For Outward opening doors. Hold the tool like a baseball bat at the fork end. Swing the tool as hard as you can at the door and drive the pike end into the door near the handle/lock(METAL DOOR) Then pull on the fork end to pull the door away from the frame. This works well for doors that are real tight, where you can not get an initial purchase. Once it is pulled back you will be able to get the adze end in to force the door. This also may open the door completely if there is a "push bar" on the other side because it may just knock it off.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChicagoFF
    replied
    Originally posted by NDeMarse
    Someone requested Halligans?

    - If you cut peaked roofs by SOP, bring at least a 10' hook to the roof to push down the ceiling. With a 6' hook you are going to take a beating trying to push down a ceiling. A 10' hook will let you work like a gentleman and still reach the ceiling.
    And if you have to bail from one peaked roof to the next, you can drive the pick of your "waste of time axe" into the other roof on landing to give you something to hold.
    - With the Halligan As Erics99 says: Drive the pike into the wall and pull up for your initial hole. then slide the tool fork first into the wall and pull out. It will open up huge sections of the wall with minimal effort.
    We do the same with our "WOTA". Open a hole, drop the handle down the wall, grab the pick and blade and pull.

    - Anything less than an 8lb axe or maul (slege) is a waste of time. 6lb axes should be chromed, engraved, given to a great guy and hung on a wall. I always take the 10-12lb sledge when I have the irons.

    - Speaking of waste of time: Pickhead axes! Ohhhh! The Chicago guys are gonna go nuts! LOL. Throw them on a rig that does all of their running in a parade route and get a real FFs tool! The halligan is just as effective and very versitile! Don't get me wrong, there are some guys that know the pick-head up and down and can do a lot of stuff with it. I think it is just easier to do the same things with the halligan. Sorry pickhead axe guys, just my feeling, nothing personal!
    Easier to open a hardwood floor with a halligan? Easier to chop out a windshield with a halligan? Easier to vent a peaked roof with a halligan?Easier to swing a halligan and punch out a trunk lock than a pick axe? Easier to open auto hoods for the pipe with a halligan? A real FF's tool? Yeah, no one associates pickhead axes with the fire department! Old school!
    Other than that, some good stuff!

    Leave a comment:


  • NDeMarse
    replied
    Truck Tips

    Someone requested Halligans?

    - Use a small diameter rope and friction tape to create a grip for one hand when you are using the tool as a striking tool. Start up the handle about 9" from the forks and make 9" of friction tape and cord wrap. When you are using the halligan as a striking tool, one hand should be just above the fork and the other on the cord & tape wrap. This will stop you from slipping off/down the tool

    - Weld a steel ring or loop from the fork to the handle on the fork side opposite the adz end. This is for venting top floor windows from the roof. Use your utility rope with a snap hook. Attach the snap hook to the ring. Lower the halligan to the top pane of the window to measure it. At that point wrap the rope around your hand once, raise the halligan to the roof and throw it off. The halligan will swing back into the building and break the window.

    - If you have your own halligan weld your name on it so it doesn't get mixed up. We had crap halligans on my former department so I bought my own. I don't have to worry about that anymore.

    - When taking doors and all you have is a halligan and the halligan hook you can put the halligan hook head on the floor. Hold the halligan in 1 hand where you want it. Then step on the 90 degree side of the halligan hook for stability and slam the steel handle into the halligan tool to force entry. It will work for some doors but not all.

    - Speaking of Halligan hooks: The 90 degree angle is for pulling ceiling, the 45 degree angle is for pulling roof boards. If you have a gas shut-off end, that end is great for banging up boards of finished attics when you need to gain access.

    - If you cut peaked roofs by SOP, bring at least a 10' hook to the roof to push down the ceiling. With a 6' hook you are going to take a beating trying to push down a ceiling. A 10' hook will let you work like a gentleman and still reach the ceiling.

    - With the Halligan As Erics99 says: Drive the pike into the wall and pull up for your initial hole. then slide the tool fork first into the wall and pull out. It will open up huge sections of the wall with minimal effort.

    - The same tactic can be done with the 6' hook. just be careful to not over-work the 6' wood hook. Only pull what is sensible. IT WILL BREAK, trust me! If you only pull two feet of material at a time you are still moving faster than if you were using the hook to pull the wall.

    - You can also use the same tactic on the ceiling with the hook or the halligan if you have a floor boards from the floor above. You will have to find something to stand on if you are using the halligan. Open up a small area, slide the hook behind the ceiling and pull down. Large sections of ceiling will come down with it. This won't work if there is nothing behind the ceiling (i.e. unfinished attic).

    - Anything less than an 8lb axe or maul (slege) is a waste of time. 6lb axes should be chromed, engraved, given to a great guy and hung on a wall. I always take the 10-12lb sledge when I have the irons.

    - Speaking of waste of time: Pickhead axes! Ohhhh! The Chicago guys are gonna go nuts! LOL. Throw them on a rig that does all of their running in a parade route and get a real FFs tool! The halligan is just as effective and very versitile! Don't get me wrong, there are some guys that know the pick-head up and down and can do a lot of stuff with it. I think it is just easier to do the same things with the halligan. Sorry pickhead axe guys, just my feeling, nothing personal!

    - When hitting a halligan tool on forcible entry, get on your knees and put the axe or maul perpindicular to the floor (handle straight up & down). Use short swinged, controlled hits and strike the adz end right where the handle is. This will provide you the maximum target and you shouldn't miss and break the irons FF's wrist.

    - If forcing a door in zero or limited visibility, before you strike the halligan, listen for the irons FF to call out "hit". When he calls hit, reach out and touch the halligan where you plan to hit it. Move your hand and hit it. Before you hit it again, repeat the same steps. Remember that the halligan will probably be in a different spot as you force the door. You wouldn't believe the difference it makes by touching the halligan.

    That's all I have for now! I'll throw more down later!

    Leave a comment:


  • NDeMarse
    replied
    Engine Tips & Tricks

    Nice thread Vinnie. This should be good!

    I can go on all day on stuff like this!

    - When operating any line as a nozzle FF keep the nozzle out in front of you at least 3 feet. It should be just in reach so you can operate the bale of the nozzle. This makes it easier to operate the line. It is easier to bend the nozzle around a corner to hit fire or if there is fire over your head you don't have to do a triple lindy backflip to hit it. Just point and aim and it goes out.

    - Do yourself and your company a favor and saw off the pistol grip so you don't get stuck with the nozzle in your chest and unable to operate it without wrestling the line and overworking yourself.

    - When adding a length to a short-stretch or preconnect (remember preconnects can't hit everything) ALWAYS add it from the supply (engine or stand-pipe) side. It is much faster and easier to add it when done this way. It is usually the Engine Chauffeur that is adding it anyway, and that is his position.

    - ALWAYS FLUSH THE HYDRANT OR STAND-PIPE. THIS ISN'T A TIP, IT'S A MUST, BUT YET FFs STILL DON'T DO IT! Why hook up if you don't know if it is going to work?

    - If operating with no backup FF. Situate yourself on a wall before you open the line. Let the nozzle reaction be absorbed by the wall.

    - If operating with no backup FF. Put a knee on the hose line about 5 feet back from the nozzle before you open the nozzle. The nozzle reaction should be transmitted to the floor.

    - When washing down. Whoever is overhaulling, have them pull ALL of the ceilings and ALL of the walls that need to be pulled. Then have them LEAVE the room. Move to one corner of the room and operate the line soaking all of the area that needs to be covered. Shut down the line, and move to the opposite corner and do the same thing. Move on to the next room and do the same until overhaul is complete. This doesn't allow any part of the opened up area to not be touched by water.

    - In hallways, to avoid cluttering make large loops of hose on the wall (about 5'-6' high) right outside the fire apartment on the opposite wall. Gravity will allow the hose to feed to the nozzle team. When the loops start to go away, feed more hose to the loop or make another one.

    - If you are operating with a solid stream (smooth-bore) line and need to perform hydraulic ventilation. Spin off the outside tip (AND PUT IT IN YOUR POCKET), move to a window and crack the nozzle 1/2 way. It is not as effecient as a fog nozzle for hydraulic ventilation but it works great. You can also leave the tip on and crack the nozzle 1/2 way and that works too. I personally don't like fog nozzles for interior fire attack, and most advocates of fog nozzles use the "well I can't vent with a solid stream nozzle!" Throw this at them and see what they say. Like I said, it takes a little longer, but we are in a slow-down situation at that point. There is no need to "hurry up and get the smoke out of here" once you have it knocked down.

    - If operating as the back-up FF. Get right on the nozzle FFs back. There should be NO space between you and the nozzle FF. When the line is open there should be constant pressure on the nozzle FF so that the only thing that they are doing is pointing the stream. I have seen a backup FF up to 5' behind the nozzle FF. You are doing no good to anyone there. The back-up FF should also be giving the nozzle FF positive encouragement. Phrases like "keep going", "good job", "keep moving in" do A TON for a new or even the experienced firefighter in a fire. Remember, you are there to back them up physically and mentally!

    I'll throw more down later!

    Leave a comment:


  • Ltmdepas3280
    replied
    When sitting on a 2.5 at a large and prolonged job...find an old tire and 3 cinder blocks. Place the 1 block on the ground and the tire on top of the block...loop the line and place the nozzle on top of the tire with approx 2 feet hanging over the tire...place the other two blocks on each side of the line ( together) a few of feet back from the tire this will allow you a dry place to sit while you play the line. Make sure the loop is on top of and in front of the blocks. ...Work smarter not harder

    Leave a comment:


  • erics99
    replied
    Good tips Vinnie. Gotta love them women firefighters . Anyway, got any tips for the good ol Halligan? My tool of choice, great for overhualing and obviously forcible entry. For lath and plaster walls I like to drive the pike into the wall, tilt up, and pull the lath and plaster off the studs when intitially opening up.

    As for 2 1/2s, if only two guys available, have the second guy pin the line to the ground if static, beats having the 2nd guy holding the line and trying to put his weight into it.

    When advancing a line, don't get yourself between the turn and the hoseline.

    Leave a comment:


  • Skwerl530
    replied
    Need to overhaul a trailer?

    Uh I mean manufactured house. Use the hook on a drywall hook to rip the siding then tear it back with said hook. If there is paneling on the inside push it in with the blunt bit of an axe. Don't try to cut it with the blade, it will take forever. Just "jab" it with the head of the axe where the paneling is nailed to the wall.

    For those that don't know, this is a drywall hook:
    http://www.emc4rescue.com/catalogs/e...d/it010028.htm

    No I don't sell them this was just the 1st picture I found.
    Last edited by Skwerl530; 10-04-2005, 10:19 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • VinnieB
    started a topic Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

    Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

    Ok.....what are your tricks of the trade.....FIREGROUND only......I could care less about EMS...which includes MVAs, unless its something REALLY GOOOD.....I want to hear about fireground tricks....

    Here's two of mine....

    1) The 2.5" line.....advancing......w/ 4 members....1 Nozzleman....1 Back up, 1 doorman, 1 control man......stretch 4 lengths minimum for a fire in a taxpayer......make a LOOP in the line, inline w/ the nozzle team....making sure that the lead length is on top of the "pile".......2 MEN will be able to advance this line into a compartment w/o a problem. The weight of the line is inline w/ the advance......the 2 FIREMEN will be able to advance an operating line a good distance.......the same 2 MEN will be able to advance the line by themselves.......

    2) The 2.5" again.....the scenerio is that you HAVE to make a very quick push to help effect rescue of trapped members.......anyone who has actually operated a 2.5" in real fire knows how much of a BIT*H it is.....(especially basements, cellars, and subcellars ).....anyway..back on track,,,,,,
    What we do is....operate the line...crack it down, stand up to a crouch, grab the bail, and PUSH IN by RUNNING A few feet....get back into the crouch, operate, and repeat the advance......until you make the objective. If you get burned...(and you probably will.....but you got the water), no matter, it means you did what was neccessary to make sure your brothers go home ot kiss thier sweethearts that night.......this is a TRYED and TRUE tactic.....and basically...its the JOB....

    PS....I love this Sh*t....
    Last edited by VinnieB; 10-04-2005, 11:34 PM.

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