Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse

Firehouse.com Forum Rules & Guidelines

Forum Rules & Guidelines

Not Permitted or Tolerated:
• Advertising and/or links of commercial, for-profit websites, products, and/or services is not permitted. If you have a need to advertise on Firehouse.com please contact [email protected]
• Fighting/arguing
• Cyber-bullying
• Swearing
• Name-calling and/or personal attacks
• Spamming
• Typing in all CAPS
• “l33t speak” - Substituting characters for letters in an effort to represent a word or phrase. (example: M*****ive)
• Distribution of another person’s personal information, regardless of whether or not said information is public knowledge and whether or not an individual has permission to post said personal information
• Piracy advocation of any kind
• Racist, sexual, hate type defamatory, religious, political, or sexual commentary.
• Multiple forum accounts

Forum Posting Guidelines:

Posts must be on-topic, non-disruptive and relevant to the firefighting community. Post only in a mature and responsible way that contributes to the discussion at hand. Posting relevant information, helpful suggestions and/or constructive criticism is a great way to contribute to the community.

Post in the correct forum and have clear titles for your threads.

Please post in English or provide a translation.

There are moderators and admins who handle these forums with care, do not resort to self-help, instead please utilize the reporting option. Be mature and responsible for yourself and your posts. If you are offended by another member utilize the reporting option. All reported posts will be addressed and dealt with as deemed appropriate by Firehouse.com staff.

Firehouse.com Moderation Process:
Effective immediately, the following moderation process will take effect. User(s) whose posts are determined by Firehouse.com staff to be in violation of any of the rules above will EARN the following reprimand(s) in the moderation process:
1. An initial warning will be issued.
2. A Final Warning will be issued if a user is found to be in violation a second time.
3. A 3-day suspension will be issued if the user continues to break the forum rules.
4. A 45-day suspension will be issued if the user is found to be a habitual rule breaker.
5. Habitual rule breakers that have exhausted all of the above will receive a permanent life-time ban that will be strictly enforced. Reinstatement will not be allowed – there is no appeal process.

Subsequent accounts created in an effort to side-step the rules and moderation process are subject to automatic removal without notice. Firehouse.com reserves the right to expedite the reprimand process for any users as it is deemed necessary. Any user in the moderation process may be required to review and agree to by email the terms and conditions listed above before their account is re-instated (except for those that are banned).

Firehouse.com reserves the right to edit and/or remove any post or member, at any time, for any reason without notice. Firehouse.com also reserves the right to warn, suspend, and/or ban, any member, at any time, for any reason.

Firehouse.com values the active participation we have in our forums. Please ensure your posts are tasteful and tactful. Thank you very much for your cooperation.
See more
See less

Fireground Tricks of the Trade.....

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Originally posted by NDeMarse View Post
    Nice thread Vinnie. This should be good!

    I can go on all day on stuff like this!

    - When operating any line as a nozzle FF keep the nozzle out in front of you at least 3 feet. It should be just in reach so you can operate the bale of the nozzle. This makes it easier to operate the line. It is easier to bend the nozzle around a corner to hit fire or if there is fire over your head you don't have to do a triple lindy backflip to hit it. Just point and aim and it goes out.

    I totally agree with keeping it out in front of you. 3 feet? If that's what works for you, GROOVY!

    - Do yourself and your company a favor and saw off the pistol grip so you don't get stuck with the nozzle in your chest and unable to operate it without wrestling the line and overworking yourself.

    IF you get the nozzle stuck in your chest the issue isn't the pistol grip, it is either **** poor training or laziness on the nozzle operator's part. Blaming the pistol grip for the bad technique of the nozzle operator is simply ludicrous. I teach firefighters to extend the hoseline in front of them whether they are using a pistol grip nozzle or not. It is very bad technique and a losing battle if you let the nozzle get to close to your body. Both dpeartments I am on utilize pistol grip nozzles and depending on the tactic being used it is not unusual to see the nozzle operator holding the hose back from the nozzle and not the pistol grip.
    - When adding a length to a short-stretch or preconnect (remember preconnects can't hit everything) ALWAYS add it from the supply (engine or stand-pipe) side. It is much faster and easier to add it when done this way. It is usually the Engine Chauffeur that is adding it anyway, and that is his position.

    - If operating with no backup FF. Put a knee on the hose line about 5 feet back from the nozzle before you open the nozzle. The nozzle reaction should be transmitted to the floor.

    I teach this method. I like it because it allows for rapid forwward movement simply by gating the nozzle a bit and sliding your knee off the hose.

    - If you are operating with a solid stream (smooth-bore) line and need to perform hydraulic ventilation. Spin off the outside tip (AND PUT IT IN YOUR POCKET), move to a window and crack the nozzle 1/2 way. It is not as effecient as a fog nozzle for hydraulic ventilation but it works great. You can also leave the tip on and crack the nozzle 1/2 way and that works too. I personally don't like fog nozzles for interior fire attack, and most advocates of fog nozzles use the "well I can't vent with a solid stream nozzle!" Throw this at them and see what they say. Like I said, it takes a little longer, but we are in a slow-down situation at that point. There is no need to "hurry up and get the smoke out of here" once you have it knocked down.

    Sure it works. But if I use a low pressure combo nozzle I can make a stream almost equivalent to a smoothbore AND use a fog pattern for ventilation. Would that work for the FDNY? Probably not in your buildings with debris and rust in your standpipes. We don't have that problem so for us it works just fine.

    By the way, I like smoothbore nozzles too but they are not the answer to everything for everyone.


    - If operating as the back-up FF. Get right on the nozzle FFs back. There should be NO space between you and the nozzle FF. When the line is open there should be constant pressure on the nozzle FF so that the only thing that they are doing is pointing the stream. I have seen a backup FF up to 5' behind the nozzle FF. You are doing no good to anyone there. The back-up FF should also be giving the nozzle FF positive encouragement. Phrases like "keep going", "good job", "keep moving in" do A TON for a new or even the experienced firefighter in a fire. Remember, you are there to back them up physically and mentally!

    Sorry I disagree, if the back up firefighter is doing his job and taking the back pressure there is no need for them to be pushing on the back of the nozzle operator. I have told more than one back up man to get off my *** and give me room to work. Be close when I open the nozzle, but don't be pushing on me, push the hose.

    I'll throw more down later!
    Yeah, yeah, I know this is an old topic.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

    Comment


    • Originally posted by cdemarse View Post
      And a smooth bore definitely helps too
      Why? Nozzle pressure? Would it be different if the same flow came from a 50 psi combo nozzle?
      Crazy, but that's how it goes
      Millions of people living as foes
      Maybe it's not too late
      To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

      Comment


      • Originally posted by tny1771 View Post
        very good thread, would be nice to see it live on.
        totally agree! This single thread has more useful information in it than 90% of the crap posted lately. Tons of good tips for those of us that haven't been around in the fire service very long.

        Even if some disagree with the tips, it's just nice to have options on the fireground. Some of the ways that a pickhead could be used mentioned at the begining of the thread, I'd never heard before. Does that mean that I'm gonna use them? Not necessarily, but I like keeping them somewhere in the ol' noodle in case they might prove useful someday.

        I'd be a shame if it turned into a "your way's stupid" thread.
        Nothing is as unimpressive as someone who is unwilling to learn.

        Comment


        • While there is great information in this thread, I find it more interesting to see how the posters interacted with each other. Not nearly of a confrontational tone between posters as is common now. This must have been the "good old days" you always hear about.

          Comment


          • TIC Use

            Use the TIC to tell the fluid levels in a container (for you HazMat Fellas)... Different levels and different fluids absorb more or less heat.

            Use your TIC to tell when Interior Conditions are changing; most TICs switch the way they are operating (can't think of the technical name here) at approximately 350 degree F. If you're scanning and don't see it stall then chances are it's less than that. If you're scanning and notice the screen stops and then looks a bit different then it's changed how it's sending the information and is probably over 350 degrees at your level.

            I saw this on another site... If there is no pillar or something solid in the front of the residence and you need a Search Line, use your Halligan and pound it into the ground using the forked ends.

            Use the Halligan on the roof to give you a foot-hold when it's needed to step off the roof ladder on a pitched roof.

            Remember, when using a tool (axe, halligan, pike pole, etc) to improve your reach think about what you are sticking out there and send the handle out. The exception would be the Halligan, send the forked-end out.

            Definitely some good stuff here.....
            "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

            Life on the Truck (Quint) is good.....

            Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

            Comment


            • Another Trick...

              When cutting a commercial garage door (aluminum sheeted or slats) make (3) cuts. The 1st cut goes vertical (high to low), 2nd cut is a small triangle cut at the bottom of the vertical cut (allows you to cut the bottom rail of the vertical cut) and the 3rd cut goes at shoulder height horizontally. Takes as much time as a "Tee-pee Cut" and opens the door all the way open.

              Use the Halligan or the Pick-Headed Axe to make entry into a sectional residential garage door. Make a hole and then grab the line that disconnects the door from the lifter. I recommend the Halligan since the pick can be used and the adze end makes the hole bigger and then grab the line with the forked end and twist the tool. The line will catch between the forks and pull, releasin the door.
              "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

              Life on the Truck (Quint) is good.....

              Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

              Comment


              • For those of us that drive or respond to extreme differences in elevations; chew gum while driving or riding. Not quite sure how it works, but it does. Works well for flying in aircraft also.
                "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

                Life on the Truck (Quint) is good.....

                Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

                Comment


                • Bump.......

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by erics99 View Post
                    Good tips Vinnie. Gotta love them women firefighters . Anyway, got any tips for the good ol Halligan? My tool of choice, great for overhualing and obviously forcible entry. For lath and plaster walls I like to drive the pike into the wall, tilt up, and pull the lath and plaster off the studs when intitially opening up.

                    As for 2 1/2s, if only two guys available, have the second guy pin the line to the ground if static, beats having the 2nd guy holding the line and trying to put his weight into it.

                    When advancing a line, don't get yourself between the turn and the hoseline.
                    A haligan good for over-haul?......I would rather use a commercial water key over a haligan. A haligan belongs married to a flat head for forcible entry. Thats it. Thats just my personal pref.
                    "....train as if your life depends on it, because one day it could.."
                    .....Leather Head N6A
                    Tillerman..... The best job in the FD!!!

                    Comment


                    • try using a cip saw for garage doors, make the "L" cut and shove a halligan under the bottom to give you enough space to finish the last of the cut. Try it sometime, it has worked well for me.
                      ?

                      Comment


                      • Oh and make you a starting point with the pike of the halligan wallowed out.
                        ?

                        Comment


                        • Regarding the fine particulate glass in the air topic that was brought-up, I've seen FDs that use shaving cream to stop this from occurring. How they've done it is, spray the cream and then use a reciprocating saw to cut the windshield. It seems to work for them.

                          If I'm gonna work on a 2 1/2" for awhile, I'll "Q" it up (exposure loop) and sit on it with my legs crossed and place the hose line on the side hard rubber of my boots. It's never failed me, and requires no additional equipment. For lateral movement I'll attach a 1" tubular webbing to the hose using a larks foot and then take the large loop and put it around me. To raise all I have to do is lean back.
                          "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

                          Life on the Truck (Quint) is good.....

                          Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

                          Comment


                          • Residential garage doors.....

                            To open a residential garage door, make a hole with the point of the halligan, make the hole bigger by using the adze end and then still the forked in inside and slide it over the manual release for the door. Twist the halligan and it frees the door from the garage door opener's lifting mechanism.
                            "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

                            Life on the Truck (Quint) is good.....

                            Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

                            Comment


                            • Door chocks...

                              The next time you cut a lock, keep it. I have one that I keep in my turnout jacket and have used it numerous times to keep a door open. It works a couple of ways: 1) Turn the metal locking part that you cut and slide it over the hinges, turn the lock flat and the door will only close as thick as the lock is 2) For metal doors, flip the metal locking part (hooked part) over the top of the door and either the hooked part or the lock itself will come in contact with the jamb and hold the door.

                              Another use for a cut lock is to use it similar to how the golf balls have been used here. Only, don't throw them as hard and make sure the Guys on the interior know what's happening. Works on auto side glass as well. I swing the lock by the locking part and hit the window in the corner, it's been pretty successful for me.

                              I was gonna post how to use the lock as a "fist pack" for those ETOH folks that insist on a fight, but I don't work in that type of district anymore. LOL.
                              "Be LOUD, Be PROUD..... It just might save your can someday when goin' through an intersection!!!!!"

                              Life on the Truck (Quint) is good.....

                              Eat til you're sleepy..... Sleep til you're hungry..... And repeat.....

                              Comment


                              • Bump...

                                I've always liked this thread, so it's time to bring it back for another round of tips.
                                Nothing is as unimpressive as someone who is unwilling to learn.

                                Comment

                                300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                                Collapse

                                Upper 300x250

                                Collapse

                                Taboola

                                Collapse

                                Leader

                                Collapse
                                Working...
                                X