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  • Standpipe kit and ops

    Our standpipe kit consists of spanners, a pipe wrench, an inline gauge, 2 1/2 to 1 1/2 reducer, wedges and door straps. We run 2 1/2 with a 1 1/8 inch smooth bore off the standpipe and carry the reducer for a smaller line for mop up.

    I have seen people talk about using a gate valve, an elbow, and an inline gauge with a drain as their connection to the riser.

    So tell me what your set up is.
    Crazy, but that's how it goes
    Millions of people living as foes
    Maybe it's not too late
    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

  • #2
    The vast majority of our standpipes are wet systems with a built in valve at every outlet. There would be no need to attach a gate valve. I assume some other departments deal with dry systems w/o gates? No elbow required because outlet points downward.

    Our kit includes an in line pressure gauge, spanners, pipe wrench, extra control wheels for when it is missing from outlet due to vandalism and adapters to ensure our FDNY fittings can be used on the system. (Code requires our threads but occasionally it is national pipe thread or national standard thread.)

    I believe in keeping it simple. Just carry what you will need MOST of the time. That bag could get real heavy.

    It is SOP to remove the cap (and pressure reducer on some systems), open the valve and flush system prior to hooking hose up. This verifies water is flowing and also is done to flush out debris, contraband, etc.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by captnjak View Post
      The vast majority of our standpipes are wet systems with a built in valve at every outlet. There would be no need to attach a gate valve. I assume some other departments deal with dry systems w/o gates? No elbow required because outlet points downward.

      The comments made to me regarded valves that don't work properly. Example being hard to open so it would be harder to gate back the discharge to control flow pressure. So once you had the standpipe valve open you would use the gate valve to gate the discharge as needed.

      Our kit includes an in line pressure gauge, spanners, pipe wrench, extra control wheels for when it is missing from outlet due to vandalism and adapters to ensure our FDNY fittings can be used on the system. (Code requires our threads but occasionally it is national pipe thread or national standard thread.)

      I believe in keeping it simple. Just carry what you will need MOST of the time. That bag could get real heavy.

      I made that point too. Especially in understaffed companies where you want to keep the load light so the guys have something left to allow them to actually fight fire.

      It is SOP to remove the cap (and pressure reducer on some systems), open the valve and flush system prior to hooking hose up. This verifies water is flowing and also is done to flush out debris, contraband, etc.

      I hadn't thought of that. I will add that to our procedure.
      Like you I am a fan of keeping it as simple as possible. Thanks for your response.
      Crazy, but that's how it goes
      Millions of people living as foes
      Maybe it's not too late
      To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

      Comment


      • #4
        The idea that a valve might just be too hard to operate hadn't occurred to me. Live and learn. Personally haven't seen one where a pipe wrench wouldn't work. But why fight it? The gate would make sense then.

        Do you use a pressure gauge or a flow gauge?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by FyredUp View Post
          Our standpipe kit consists of spanners, a pipe wrench, an inline gauge, 2 1/2 to 1 1/2 reducer, wedges and door straps. We run 2 1/2 with a 1 1/8 inch smooth bore off the standpipe and carry the reducer for a smaller line for mop up.

          I have seen people talk about using a gate valve, an elbow, and an inline gauge with a drain as their connection to the riser.

          So tell me what your set up is.
          why the reducer ? wont your playpipe do the same ? We carry a small bungee and strap the bale open when extending an 1-3/4 off the playpipe-
          ?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by captnjak View Post
            The idea that a valve might just be too hard to operate hadn't occurred to me. Live and learn. Personally haven't seen one where a pipe wrench wouldn't work. But why fight it? The gate would make sense then.

            Do you use a pressure gauge or a flow gauge?
            Pressure gauge.
            Crazy, but that's how it goes
            Millions of people living as foes
            Maybe it's not too late
            To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by slackjawedyokel View Post

              why the reducer ? wont your playpipe do the same ? We carry a small bungee and strap the bale open when extending an 1-3/4 off the playpipe-
              I can't answer that. The kit was assembled before I joined the department.
              Crazy, but that's how it goes
              Millions of people living as foes
              Maybe it's not too late
              To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

              Comment


              • #8
                When I started out the firefighter at the outlet tested the quality of the water supply by stepping on the hose to gauge it's hardness. And the officer gauged it by listening to the stream as it hit walls/ceilings.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by captnjak View Post
                  When I started out the firefighter at the outlet tested the quality of the water supply by stepping on the hose to gauge it's hardness. And the officer gauged it by listening to the stream as it hit walls/ceilings.
                  and pretty close --I still step on supply lines when pumping
                  ?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by slackjawedyokel View Post

                    and pretty close --I still step on supply lines when pumping
                    I do that too.

                    Crazy, but that's how it goes
                    Millions of people living as foes
                    Maybe it's not too late
                    To learn how to love, and forget how to hate

                    Comment

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