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The insignificance of "Drain Times"

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  • LeeJunkins
    replied
    I am trying to get people into the habit of treating every vehicle the same. I know that every incident is different but the routine can be the same for the safety factors.
    Most of us have a habit that when we pull up on scene the first thing that happens is the EMS jumps out of the truck, grabs his med bags and runs to the patient. If this vehicle is a Prius most of us would know not to, but if it was a Honda Civic, or Toyota Camry there is know way of knowing whether it is a hybrid or not until we see the emblem on the trunk lid. And it could be in Idle Stop Mode.
    What I am trying to instill is place two chucks in the box were your med bags are kept, when the EMS person jumps out let him place one under each wheel when the other person jumps out let him cut the battery cables, now we are not going to be run over and the bleed down time has started, now the officer can make his walk around, the Medic can do his triage, The third man can set up his tools, the officer tells the rescuer what he found and a purchase point is made. The average bleed down time is almost over.
    If we get in the habit of doing it to every vehicle then the one bad one is not going to get us, and all of this can be done without knowing the make and model and without the time of looking it up in a book, and with a small or large crew.
    Remember we teach an average bleed down time is five minutes, but if you look them up in the books about 80% are less than one minute.
    Last edited by LeeJunkins; 04-25-2007, 01:06 PM.

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  • Bones42
    replied
    In the time it takes to find the information in the book/cd, the capacitor has drained.

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  • GAFTO2
    replied
    Drain Times

    I tried as many people did to keep up with this information. I was sitting in Chicago at one of Todd Hoffmans classes when the lightbulb finally came on. There was a picture of a mangled wreck on the screen and he asked the class to quickly identify it. Same Principle with the holmatro book, Great book. But you have to be able to indentify the year make and model of the vehicle for it to be of use. I think that Ron is on the right track. Know that there is a drain factor Cut the cables turn on the lights confirm power down and treat everything as it were still live ( some cars still have the mechanical airbags Volvo , jeep etc..)

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  • hrtrescue10
    replied
    I guess Ron forgot about the Rescuer's Guide put out by Holmatro, funny..

    The newest one at FDIC had thru the 2007 model, in print and CD. They said they will be updating it yearly. The drain times were listed as well as so much other info. The $200 price makes it a bargain when compared most of the other stuff I have looked at on the market.
    I really liked the CD version.

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  • CAPPYY
    replied
    We cut the cables for extrication or fire hazards and disconnect for minor incidents. We always double cut so there is no chance of the cable coming back together. Drain times are insignificant due to the fact that we won't be standing around waiting and we treat every vehicle as if the power is still on and bags may blow anyway.

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  • Bones42
    replied
    With all the possible other power sources that could exist, I'd rather NOT connect the positive and negative together. OnStar systems, cell phones, etc.

    We disconnect and that's it.

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  • domi411
    replied
    Originally posted by rmoore View Post
    Received a request from a vehicle rescue instructor who wanted an updated chart with all the drain times of vehicles. I used to keep one up-to-date until around model year 2000. then I sort of changed my mind about the significance of knowing the drain time for every vehicle.

    Here's my thoughts on this topic...

    Most sources like lists of airbag 'drain times' have dried up. Seems that the information isn't really important to know for each individual vehicle like we thought it might be.

    I recommend that you;

    1) Shut down the power and 2) go about your business. Drain times for the past 6 to 8 years worth of cars average about 2 to 5 minutes. Some drain in one second.

    Remember, nothing happens till you shut down the power. There are three steps to shutting down power that must become your standard operating procedure;

    1- locate battery/batteries and disconnect or double cut both negative and positive cables

    2- determine that power to vehicle is shut down by viewing lights, instrument panel, etc to confirm

    3- unplug any accessory appliances plugged in to the cigarette lighter or other power ports.

    If there is any new and updated info available on the drain times, it would be Todd Hoffman that would have it. I don't care about these little details any longer.

    You may want to contact Todd, owner of the private website www.sceneoftheaccident.org. Todd's email is [email protected]
    Somebody talk to me about connect the positive and the negative together to drain all the power, what to you think about that????

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  • rmoore
    started a topic The insignificance of "Drain Times"

    The insignificance of "Drain Times"

    Received a request from a vehicle rescue instructor who wanted an updated chart with all the drain times of vehicles. I used to keep one up-to-date until around model year 2000. then I sort of changed my mind about the significance of knowing the drain time for every vehicle.

    Here's my thoughts on this topic...

    Most sources like lists of airbag 'drain times' have dried up. Seems that the information isn't really important to know for each individual vehicle like we thought it might be.

    I recommend that you;

    1) Shut down the power and 2) go about your business. Drain times for the past 6 to 8 years worth of cars average about 2 to 5 minutes. Some drain in one second.

    Remember, nothing happens till you shut down the power. There are three steps to shutting down power that must become your standard operating procedure;

    1- locate battery/batteries and disconnect or double cut both negative and positive cables

    2- determine that power to vehicle is shut down by viewing lights, instrument panel, etc to confirm

    3- unplug any accessory appliances plugged in to the cigarette lighter or other power ports.

    If there is any new and updated info available on the drain times, it would be Todd Hoffman that would have it. I don't care about these little details any longer.

    You may want to contact Todd, owner of the private website www.sceneoftheaccident.org. Todd's email is [email protected]

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