Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Take the roof

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Take the roof

    http://krassphoto.fotki.com/car-crash-firemen-i/

  • #2
    Great stabilization by the infamous FDNY?!

    Comment


    • #3
      Eye protection, gloves?

      Comment


      • #4
        Not to concerned with gloves and eyes, that is their own choice, as much as my concern about the proper stabilization techniques(SP?).

        Comment


        • #5
          you got to remember its the fdny. they doing things there own way its kind of rediculous that what looks to be a batt. chief is there and also is not properly dressed for the occasion and stabalization where the hell is it. wow if i ever did that my chief would have my 6 in a sling

          Comment


          • #6
            Wellllll! It's a little different than the way I teach it, but sure is some pretty cutting (nice straight lines even on the glass).
            http://www.midsouthrescue.org
            Is it time to change our training yet ?

            Comment


            • #7
              I'll be damned. That sure looks like some pretty good sized pieces of cribbing to me. It seems a little difficult to declare there was "no" stabilization.



              Last edited by Steamer; 12-26-2006, 01:43 AM.
              Steve Gallagher
              IACOJ BOT
              ----------------------------
              "I don't apologize for anything. When I make a mistake, I take the blame and go on from there." - Woody Hayes

              Comment


              • #8
                Hell, I just enjoyed seeing the Gamewell still in existance on the street corner!
                Richard Nester
                Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

                "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

                Comment


                • #9
                  They should turn it into a "promotional educational training video" and show they are the best in the country! Then it would be Ok.

                  (PS - don't forget the FBI warnings...)
                  Last edited by Bones42; 12-26-2006, 10:08 AM.
                  "This thread is being closed as it is off-topic and not related to the fire industry." - Isn't that what the Off Duty forum was for?

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    bones thats all they need all the copyright and fbi warnings

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The stabilization might be "minimal", but it is a best case scenario.

                      1. An SUV on it's side. Nothing more stable than that (except maybe a full-size van on it's side).

                      2. A perfectly flat, paved intersection. No ground instability or slope considerations at all.

                      3. They had multiple large step chocks in place, and while we couldn't see the underside, the thing looks pretty stable to me.

                      4. A pretty non-invasive roof-flap. The vehicle retained most of it's integrity throughout the evolution.


                      A strut or two might have been nice, but I wouldn't knock anybody for that particular scenario.

                      But yes, the lack of eye and hand protection while using tools would have gotten an *** chewing on my dept. MY Dept.
                      Never argue with an Idiot. They drag you down to their level, and then beat you with experience!

                      IACOJ

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I’d be more concerned about no C-spine on the patient. Couldn’t anyone gain access through the back window and perform C-spine, or were they concerned about their cribbing job not holding? Finally the guy in the white coat tries after they lay her on the board. Oh ya, C-collar….we don’t need no stinkin’ C-collar. I’m glad that driver wasn’t my mother.

                        PS…. I wonder if in that huddle the quarterback was going to call a passing or running play?

                        Stay Safe

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Not trying to start an argument but placing step chocks and shims are the initial stabilization process to expand the foot print of a vehicle on its side and should be expanded on before the extrication process begins. You may be stable initially with chocks but things change during the extrication, that is why we should always be re-evaluating our stabilization and action plan through out the entire incident.
                          Also, your initial plan of just flapping a portion of the roof may change due to rescuer access, pt injuries, etc. causing the rescuer to expand on or change their initial access point. This point is now limited if steps chocks are soley used to stabilize. We must have versitility built into all of our rescue operations so we can adapt and over come to the unforseen.

                          Yes there are many ways to do things, but we must choose the safest, most versitile, and efficient path to maximize our rescue capabilities.

                          be safe...happy new year!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I'm amazed they can lay their tools down like that, and no one try to take anything.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PGTL33 View Post
                              Not trying to start an argument but placing step chocks and shims are the initial stabilization process to expand the foot print of a vehicle on its side and should be expanded on before the extrication process begins. You may be stable initially with chocks but things change during the extrication, that is why we should always be re-evaluating our stabilization and action plan through out the entire incident.
                              Also, your initial plan of just flapping a portion of the roof may change due to rescuer access, pt injuries, etc. causing the rescuer to expand on or change their initial access point. This point is now limited if steps chocks are soley used to stabilize. We must have versitility built into all of our rescue operations so we can adapt and over come to the unforseen.

                              Yes there are many ways to do things, but we must choose the safest, most versitile, and efficient path to maximize our rescue capabilities.

                              be safe...happy new year!

                              You are right, that stabilization should be evaluated. Maybe the pictures did not show someone evaluating the chocks that were in place. If the vehicle is stabile and stays stabile then there is no problem.
                              Stay Safe & Bring 'em Home!
                              Eddie C.
                              I.A.F.F. Local 3008

                              "Doin' it for lives n' property"

                              ** "The comments made here are this person's views and not that of the organizations to which I am affiliated" **

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X