Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Strut-type stabilization

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Strut-type stabilization

    For those using strut-type stabilization (such as Airshore, Z-Mag, Capabear, Warthog, Nightmare, Rescue 42, etc.) on vehicles on their sides or roof; what are you using? What has been your experience, good or bad. Comments on ease of use, versatility, storage, etc.
    R.A. Ricciuti
    Mt. Lebanon Fire Department

  • #2
    We just got our warthog, still waiting for the saleman to come over and give us the training on it before we use it. Have you had yours for a while? Any luck?
    Steve Dragon
    FFII, Fire Instructor II, Fire Officer I, Fire Appartus Driver Operator Certified
    Volunteers are never "off duty".
    http://www.bufd7.org

    Comment


    • #3
      We have Z-mags and the paratech struts. We originally just got them for rollovers, but we seem to find more uses for them all the time. Using the straps and adjustable struts or lengths of wood really saves on cribbing and set up time. 4x4's, trucks, vehicles that have come to rest on embankments or guardrails or other vehicles are all candidates for tensioned buttress stabilization in my opinion. For a car on its side we try to "set" the vehicle on the struts using a winch or come along (just take the slack out of the cable) We find it makes the car rock solid and gives us the entire shiny side of the car to work off of with no extra equipment in the way.

      Comment


      • #4
        Rari: Just checked mapquest and it says that you are about 4.5 hours west of me,(Pa. is way too big of a state). Let me make a few suggestions to you. Don't let internet "experts" make your decissions for you, try several types and decide for yourself. Look for ease of operation, calculate the "3:00am. fumble factor", look at training issues, reguired storage space, and the space that it will take out of your budget. Also look at versatility. Are they a one dimension tool or can I use them in many situations. Then decide. Why not line up a few cars for a Saturday (too long a drive for an evening) and give me a call. I would be happy to let you play with a few "Blue Tools". If that dosen't suit I'll make you the same offer I make everybody. I can send you a set on "trial" use and abuse them for 45 days, if they work for you send a check, if not send them back UPS collect, no strings attached. The only way you will ever know if a tool works is to try it. What have you got to lose?

        Zmag

        Comment


        • #5
          I'l tell you one thing. Regardless of what type of tensioned buttress stabilization equipment you purchase, you will be impressed with the job it can do. The "dis-believers" in my fire department only had to be given the opportunity to use the system we bought once, and they were "converted" into believers. A vehicle will still be shakey even after you've applied all the cribbing you can. Put a tensioned system into service, and that same vehicle will be rock solid.

          Plano Fire Rescue compared the Cepco Tool company RES-Q jack system, the CRUTCH, Capa-Bear Claws, Z-Mag Ground Pads, Holmatro Struts, Paratech's system, the Hurst Warthog system, and the new Airshore system. There is also a nice new system out from Rescue 42 that wasn't available when we did our field testing. Check 'em out and remember, any of them will improve your stabilization and your scene safety significantly.

          Ron Moore
          Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
          www.universityofextrication.com

          Comment


          • #6
            A Secured-Buttress System, (some call it tensioned, but I think secured is more appropriate), will make you vehicle on its side or roof rock solid is used properly. What I prefer to do is use them in conjunction with wedges and hi-lift jacks. An earlier post mentioned using a winch to "set" the vehicle on the secured-buttress system. I do the same with a hi-lift jack. (This way I dont have the cable to work around). Set you system on one side and "set" it into place with the jacks. Place wedges where the vehicle and ground meet and you will have one rock solid crib job. As stated, use them all and make an informed decision. good luck
            Skip Rupert
            Shrewsbury, PA
            "Keeper of the Rescue Zone"
            [email protected]

            Comment

            300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

            Collapse

            Upper 300x250

            Collapse

            Taboola

            Collapse

            Leader

            Collapse
            Working...
            X