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  • #16
    I don't mean to sound stupid here, but most of our guys use welding gloves. They are durable, heat resistant, fit well, excellent dexterity and sense of feel, cheap.

    We just cut off the large cuff so there is only about an inch left. Also we use a smoothed leather as opposed to the suede.

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    • #17
      I agree with Resq I personally use the Mechanix Imact2 they in my opinion are awesome. Though not fire-resistant they are durable with re-enforced finger tips and alot of padding. They are better than average for feeling small things. I believe the Nomex gloves would be Ideal, but at this time my budget does not let me get them I think I shall get rid her. (my budget)

      Just an addition everyone is concerned about flash-fire. My question is: Are any of you thinking about Blood-borne I saw someone and I am sorry I forgot your name (I am at work)
      mentioned latex underneath, that is how I combat the blood-borne, but if you get blood on the gloves they should be disposed of anyway. Let's face it in the world today diesease is a bigger threat than fire in a situation like this you never know who's got what.

      [ 08-02-2001: Message edited by: MFF ]
      Proud to be IACOJ Illinois Chapter--Deemed "Crustworthy" Jan, 2003

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      • #18
        Forgive my laziness in not getting names from some of these comments.

        I have hardly ever (if ever) made it through an entire extrication with Fire Gloves on. I have been through several entire extrications without taking my extrication gloves off (Ringers now). Kinda increases their effectiveness I guess.

        So in all the posts, we find someone who was involved in the one in a million fire, and he indicates even a hoseline in place would have had limited effectiveness. hmmmmmm

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        • #19
          Regarding the Mechanix M-16s gloves, our staff members have tried this glove in the past. They all had the same comments about them. Some are good, some are bad. They are good for fit. they have a close fit and are great dealing with heated objects. BUT! they are not durable. They have vent holes on the side of the fingers, thus, allowing forign objects to enter the glove. It is bad when glass splinters enter your glove in the middle of an extrication. Also, the wear and tear is poor on them. they only lasted about 3 months for us.
          Just remain calm, it will be okay!

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          • #20
            Originally posted by ffguy083:
            <STRONG>So in all the posts, we find someone who was involved in the one in a million fire, and he indicates even a hoseline in place would have had limited effectiveness. hmmmmmm</STRONG>
            I guess that one-in-a-million was me. And while a hose line would not have given much protection, no gloves on would have given no protection. Fire rated gloves should withstand a fire for at least one second before the wearer would experience a 2nd degree burn. That would be enough time to jump back if a fire were to occur.

            I have received my pair of M-16 glove. I haven't had a chance to use them yet, but I have made a couple observations.

            #1 - They seem to be sized small. I ordered my usual "large" size and these are a bit tight. I could send them back I guess, but they charge a 20% restocking fee,so for $16 I'll wear them for short periods of time. I have ordered a pair of extra-large to wear while working at motorsports events.

            #2 - The gloves are primarily nomex and therefore would not hold up well when handling broken glass and other sharp objects. Mechanix has a "Rescue Glove" on their webpage that cost $10 more, but it might at least have leater on the fingers and entire palm.

            #3 - On this pair I see no "vent holes" in the sides of the fingers. However, I am sure glass shards could penetrate the nomex with little problem.
            Richard Nester
            Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

            "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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            • #21
              Great Comments, Take a Look at NFPA-1951,
              "Protective Ensemble for Technical Rescue Incidents". (www.nfpa.org)
              Adopted in California on the same day as 1710 & 1720, it has gone mostly un-noticed.
              It will become a standard this Fall and NO current glove (best survey that I have taken)will pass.
              I know of at least one manufacturer who is
              researching a dual certified glove for both FIRE & MotorSports (SFI TPP ratings).
              Something that the NFPA-610 draft on MotorSports recommends. Clearly your concerns about FIRE & BLOOD are already demanding upcoming change.
              I suggest that if you have a favorite manufacturer, contact them and ask them to make a Dual certified glove. Point out to them that "If You Build It They Will Come".

              Go Fast, Stay Safe

              Patrick Moore
              RaceResQ, Inc. "Making MotorSports Safer"

              Pennsylvania State Fire Academy Instructor
              Chair - Training Task Force -
              National Fire Protection Association
              Technical Standards Committee-610
              "Safety in MotorSports"
              Indianapolis Motor Speedway Fire Department
              http://www.RaceResQ.Com
              [email protected]
              Go Fast, Stay Safe

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