Leader

Collapse

Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

hydraulic tools vs battery Dewalt (sal-saw)

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • hydraulic tools vs battery Dewalt (sal-saw)

    the hydraulic may last long but sal-saw is faster. WHAT YOU THINK???

  • #2
    A sawz-all kicks butt on roof removals. Alot of people say I can do it faster with a combo-tool or shears. No way I guarantee I can have my side of the roof off. Before the other side is half done. I did this last fall it took me 40 seconds to cut the A,B,and C post. The other guy with the shears just got done cutting the C post when I got done.

    Comment


    • #3
      Never say never, and always remember all ways! Cip-saws are Da-bomb, and specific task to specific task they can and do beat other tools. But don't sell your Hydraulics just yet. A variety of tools for a variety of jobs is always a good thing. Do Remember to have a plan B, C and so on. That can and does mean have a variety of methods and tools to accomplish necessary tasks. One more thing to remember SOMETIMES, just SOMETIMES if you plan your operations right you can move from task to task with with a combi tool and therefore save time OVERALL and that is the true bottom Line, OVERALL time savings, Which usually come from a well practiced and organized crew rather than One tools superiority over another

      ------------------
      Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
      Carl D. Avery

      Comment


      • #4
        I think my Amkus cutters, when operating off Amkus' PTO powerplant, can easily beat a reciprocating saw in a comparable cut. It wouldn't even be close.

        Comment


        • #5
          I'm sure your amkus is fast but you should give the dewalt 24volt saw a spin. It is pretty impressive. I think the speed of set up,size and weight is the real key. Our dept has two dewalt 24v saws and they are faster than one cutter on roof removal.

          Comment


          • #6
            we use a milwakee saw-zaw (110 V.). we put our saw zaw vs Holmatro cutters, saw-zaw won hands down on a roof removal....Just remember Keep your blade cool!

            Comment


            • #7
              I used to think thats a Sawz-All cut faster than any hydraulic tool. My opinion changed at a recent extrication tournament in Cherry Valley, Ill.

              Until this tournament, I felt a sawz-all could cut through anything with ease. Of course, all we were cutting up were junkie old Grand Ams and Camaros (nothing newer than a late '80s model.)

              However, at Cherry Valley, Ford Motor Company donated over $800,000 worth of new vehicles (nothing older than a 1998). With so many plastic components in cars these days (both decorative, structural, and all the electrical wiring running through the A, B, and C posts), what I found was the speed of the Sawz All was melting the plastic...and into the teeth of the blade. So basically I was cutting with a butter knife. I tried to vary my cuts, changing directions, etc. ...but it was still difficult.

              Has any one else experienced this issue? I would like to still rely on "hand tools", as sometimes confinement keeps us from using large hydraulic equipment. If anyone has any suggestions...please offer!

              Extrication is very important to me, and I do want to get better.

              Thanks all!

              ------------------
              Whoever said "the last man standing - wins" never asked a chick to play

              Comment


              • #8
                Did you use a spray bottle of water on your blades when cutting? Did it not help? I havent had the oppertunity to work on late model cars in practice.looking fwd to your replies. Could it be your blade was too fine toothed?

                [This message has been edited by FF-Johnston (edited 06-24-2001).]

                Comment


                • #9
                  for the person commenting on the Cherry Valley Competition, I am currious as to the TPI you were using? and the blade Brand? thanks

                  ------------------
                  Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
                  Carl D. Avery

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Carl-

                    I believe the saws were Milwaukees. As far as the blade, they werent carbide or anything. We went through two of them. Probably something cheaply replaceable. I can try to find out.
                    We're all in this together. FDNY 9-11-01

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Good info on saws in extrication can be found on the dewalt web site that is linked with firehouse.com. Our dept. recently had a hand tool class and our two dewalt 24v cip saws completely dismantled a 92 ford escort on one battery each. These saws are fast with 10-14tpi milwaukee torch blades. The milwaulkee 18v saws can not hold there own against the dewalt 24v. I also agree with a previous reply reguarding soapy water in spray bottles to keep your blades cool.
                      I would stress again to check out the dewalt web site.

                      LFD907

                      [ 06-27-2001: Message edited by: T. Faull ]

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Oh Gawd How I Love this Debate stuff. It is interesting to see the advocacy of coolant and/or Libricant for the blades. This is, has been and most likely will continue to be an on going debate. I know several prominant instructors that do not support the idea as it can deplete your personnel pool. Meaning It usually takes one person to lubricate/cool and another to run the saw ( Sounds Like the Days of the model 32A) Is that efficent use of your personnel. I say this with the following in mind. At best the coolant /lubricant prolongs the life of the blade. It does not improve the effectiveness of the blade. Now when you consider Quick Change blade feature ( as well as the variable shoe on the 24 volt Bosch and 24 volt dewalt) You can gain Blade life or Change out Blades quickly. One idea I would like to put out for your consideration is find some way to carry a spare blade or two with you on the saw. That way a Quick Change can be made even quicker!
                        Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
                        Carl D. Avery

                        Comment


                        • #13


                          Well, I'd have to say I would still lean toward recip saws. Especially on roof removals. Blades are more the issue than the saw itself, in fact I think that is the key for use with recip saws.
                          Vehicle technology wise, I don't think the trim plastics are a problem, it's the use of expansion foam in the roof pillars that hinders both recip saws (i.e. blades fowling) and power hydraulics (pillar doesnt want to crush or compress). This foam is being used as both a noise deadner and reenforcement. Plus then add in the mix of roof/side curtains/head bags.....
                          From what I've seen, used, experimented and entertained I think that blade lubrication in conjuction with today's demo/rescue recip blades are mute. I dont think it really gives any advantage, maybe blade life but that's pushing it anymore.

                          Blade-wise, the best ones I feel are either Lenox demo-fire/rescue blades or MK Morse "McRipper". Just my 2 cents.....

                          Be safe,
                          Dave D
                          Be dynamic..or go home!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Great thread here...lets keep it going. Like my buddy Dave said, I think it is the blade more than the saw. I am not an advocate of cooling solution. Like Carl mentioned, you loose a rescuer. However, what I would suggest is to remove the plastic trim before cutting. It takes a few seconds with a large screwdriver, wonderbar, small pry-bar or whatever you use. THe heat of the blade will melt the plastic and gum up the teeth. Another thing to try is slowing down the saw. Yes, faster is not always better. I got this tip from Bobby Williams when he was with Power-Hawk. According to Bobby, both DeWalt and Milwaulkee says the optimum cutting speed for the metal we run into is 1600-1800 strokes per minute (spm). When hooking up the Milwaulkee saw to the Power-Hawk power source, it is slowed to 1600 spm and I must say it cut real nice. Give it a try and see if you like it. Now I know that telling a rescue tech to run a saw at 3/4 speed during a rescue is like speaking to my 9yr old. He doesnt listen either. But give it a try. As far as blades, I'm still stuck on the Lennox 10-14 tpi blade. Guess change doesnt come easy to me. Keep it coming fellow rescue techs...
                            Skip Rupert
                            Shrewsbury, PA
                            "Keeper of the Rescue Zone"
                            [email protected]

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Good points Skip, also removing plastic molding is in good keeping with the Strip before you Rip idea. That is exposing the interior of the car so we can see hidden devices such as SRS inflators and or pretensioners. Also please note that Milwauklee has a feature (I believe it is on their super Sawzall) this limits the SPM that a saw can make, Almost Firefighter proof (there still is a switch, so it could be frigged up). No doubt about though, it is where metal meets metal that makes the biggest difference. Dare I say this? Even more so than more power! The blade is the key!
                              Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
                              Carl D. Avery

                              Comment

                              300x600 Ad Unit (In-View)

                              Collapse

                              Upper 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Leader

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X