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  • "Jacking" the Dash

    I was just wondering how many departments are "jacking" the dashes instead of using rams. Our department has done some dash jacking in training and on one run. We had some great success. Just wondering what others are doing??????

  • #2
    What are you using to jack the dash? All of our units (including many of our engines) carry Hi-Lift jacks. They do a great job of rolling a dash and are our "Plan B" for extrication as well as Ag rescue, collapse, RIC, ConSpace, underwater, etc.

    Tim O'Connell
    ------------------
    www.rescue42.com


    [This message has been edited by Rescue 42 (edited 03-23-2001).]

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    • #3
      We use our rams (6 total) to roll the dashes about 100% of the time. We still train to pull the dash using various methohds. Never know when you'll have some type of system failure and must always be prepared for the worst.

      I can remember the days when we didn't have al the fancy toys and we did the dash displacements with Model 32 Spreader, come-alongs, jacks, etc. They all work well as long as you train and become proficient.

      ------------------

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      • #4
        We are using our 28" spreader. We make cuts below the bottom hinge, place cribbing under rocker panel and lift with the spreader. Is nice because we can keep our main hydraulics hooked up and not disconnect to add rams. Works great with minimal staffing.

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        • #5
          I Like the jacking method that you descirbe, it is our first choice to lift a dash. that method keeps the Door way clear for easire patient extrication. that method has my vote!

          ------------------
          Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
          Carl D. Avery

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          • #6
            A Posting From Forum Moderator Ron Moore

            'Jacking' the dash with a power spreader will become the generally accepted technique for freeing a driver trapped by wheel, column, dash, pedal and firewall. It will also become the norm for the front seat passenger submarined under the dash and firewall.

            Why? Vehicle new technology. Take a look at an F-150 with its' third door open. No B-pillar. And the distance from the bottom of the C-pillar to the A-pillar is 58 inches.

            Take a look at the new Saturn with a third door. No B-pillar.

            A trained crew can jack the dash in 90 seconds or less and do not need a B-pillar. And at the moment the patient is free, the extrication pathway is immediately open and unobstructed. No ram in the way.

            We should all be jacking the dash as our primary method. Rolling the dash is Plan B.

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            • #7
              Well said Ron, and Excellent point, got to say I am 100% with you on this!

              ------------------
              Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
              Carl D. Avery

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              • #8
                We only run a Combi tool with a maximum 16" spread. As a result, when we jack the dash with our Combi, after the metal on the A post crushes and compacts, we only get about 10" to 12" of lift. In many cases this is enough to do the job as we only jack the dash enough to free the patient. No need to create a 25" gap when you only need 5 inches.

                However, there will be a situation where we will need more than 12" of lift to free the patient. Thus we are saving for a ram for such a situation. In the mean time, we will get the additional lift by good old hand tools.

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                • #9
                  We also like to jack the dash, we use the 32in. spreader for this, we carry six rams, 2-15in., 2-30in, and 2-60in, these have only been coming off the rig for training, and weekly checks.

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                  • #10
                    Our last auto-ex practice needed a dash pull or roll, but being front wheel drive, not possible. The idea of jacking the dash is a great one, when the technique is known, I know we didn't think of that one and it would have made patient extraction much easier; the car was at a 45* angle. I would like to know more of how this is done. If any who know how would care to answer this question, I can be reached at e-mail: "[email protected]" for suggestions/recommendations of technique.

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