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auto extrication top 10 points

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  • auto extrication top 10 points

    if you were teaching auto extrication what ten points would you express to the class.ie pinch points,srs bags ,tricks that you find worked really well etc.

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  • #2
    I am the TO of a small auto ex squad and all the new people go through our basic training. I have developed a six point system that we use on ALL calls and in our traiing.
    Scene Assessment
    Hazard control
    Stabilization
    Gain access
    Disentangle
    Breakdown/Cleanup
    Along with these 6 steps I am constantly preaching Safety (Me, Us, Them) and Communication (with each other, patients, police, ambulance, bystanders, etc.)I am also very particular about accessing and disconnecting the battery(s0, even if there are no injuries and and no entrapment. I have heard of air bags deploying while the tow truck operator is hooking up. Hope this is isn't too much off he topic.

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    Remember plan "B"

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    • #3
      1. Scene Safety
      2. Size up
      3. Protect the rescuers
      4. Stabalize the vehicles
      5. Disconnect batteries
      6. Privide a manned and charged hand line
      7. Gain access to the patient
      8. Put an EMT inside to assess the patient
      9. Remove the wreckage from the patient
      10. Remove the patient from the vehicle
      11. maintain the scene until the vehicles are removed
      12. Secure your equipment

      Woops.. that was 12... but I hope that helps...



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      Richard Nester
      Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

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      • #4
        Metalmedic hit the nail on the head. One thing I would also suggest along with safety is assign a Safety Officer to oversee. At a rescue, there is so much going on for the IC to see everything. Make sure everyone is wering the proper PPE, gloves, and eye protection as well. In regards to tricks, some newer vehicles may not alow you to do a complete roof removal, try a modified das roll, or complete side out. Be safe.

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        • #5
          The other guys gave you good info, but always stress the safety of your crew. Adding on to the scene size up. Holmatro has a book entitled "The Rescuer's Guide to Vehicle Safety Systems". It covers many of the cars on the road and tells you things like where the battery is located, capacitor drain down time, restraint systems and hydralic cylinder locations. We try to use it by calling the deputy on scene, getting the vehicle info and then looking up the information enroute. By that same token, on scene personnel can tell you about the position of the car and other vital information.

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          Train like you want to fight.

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          • #6
            I agree with all the other comments. But 2 things come to my mind in addition to the others:
            "Try before you pry" and
            "don't get tunnel vision"

            Seen people take 10 minutes to setup to pop a door, when somebody unlocks the door and opens it. Also seen people walk though a gasoline leak, power lines, and traffic to rush in to help.
            My $0.02 dly

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            Old School...Learning New Tricks
            http://members.home.net/dly135/welcome.htm

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            • #7
              If you are looking for ten good points to emphasize, then maybe you should check out the old "Brady" or "Mosby" extrication course (don't remember which one it is). It named the "10 Phases of Rescue". I am not at my full-time station today (where I am the Department Head for our Rescue Division) or I would quote them for you. I'm sure Ron Moore could quote them for you.

              Email me ([email protected]) if you would like me to quote them for you. It is an old concept (dating back to the 70's or 80's) but it is still a good system to teach, especially to rookies.


              [This message has been edited by CaptainRescue75 (edited 03-24-2001).]

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              • #8
                In response to the points We like to emphasize
                1. Scene Size Up
                2. Stabilize whats going on
                3. Size up
                4. Prevent any further harm to patient.
                5. Determine extent of entrapment
                6. Develop action Plan- A, B C as needed
                7. Implement Action plan
                8. Reassess Entrapment/Pt.
                9. Scene turned over when completed
                10. Critique when back at firehouse/scene
                Hope this helps

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                • #9
                  I agree with the postings before this. however, I recently attended a Informational meeting put on through HURST, it was not a glorified sales pitch. Instead, it was TRUELY an INFORMATIONAL meeting.

                  I have been a Firefighter/EMT for 12 years now, and I always thought of myself as a forward thinker, always up with the times. Last Monday night proved that I was wrong about that. With all the new Airbags and safety devices in the vehicles on the market, the car manufacturers are attempting to make it safe for occupants, yet they have increased the chance for at the VERY LEAST serious injury, more likely someday it is going to result in Firefighter fatalities. The are new ways to get hurt that I had no clue about, and just merrily cut away at the vehicles that I thought (perhaps stupidly) on vehicles as I had been taught from the wee early days of my career. Let me just give you one thing to incorporate with the above suggestions.
                  Peel and Peek.
                  It used to be ok to just live off of the pry before you cut, nowadays, there are gas canisters in the posts, fuel lines in the posts, Electric Cars in production that contain a battery underneath the vehicle, that now puts out up to 300 volts as opposed to the 12 volt systems us "salties" have "grown up" with. Not to mention, if that vehicle is involved in fire, that baattery now will produce as a side effect, Potassium Hydroxide. This is EXTREMELY dangerous to us out there try to help those "protected" occupants of a vehicle. I have so much information that I have put a book together for my fire department, and as it stands, it is 115 pages long, and it is outdated already, even though I just made it 2 days ago.

                  Well, that is my $.02 worth on that topic.

                  ALSO, if ANYONE has information regarding newer vehicle safety systems, I would appreciate a "heads up" so that i can help keep my people out of harms way.

                  Stay Safe, and keep putting the wet stuff on the red stuff!!

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                  • #10
                    I wonder how our esteemed moderator is coming on the latest edition of his Vehicle Rescue book....

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                    • #11
                      Most of these guys hit all the major points, but 1 little thing that gets missed I think,and it kinda relates to what the last guy was saying is, Get rid of that plastic molding when at all possible before you start to cut ! it usually doesn't take but a second to pop off (a spanner wrench works real well)that will expose any of those hidden dangers. ie.air lines,fuel lines pretentioners. Plus it makes it a lot easier
                      and cleaner cut.

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