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'Cip Saw Blades - What TPI, What Length, and How Many ?

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  • 'Cip Saw Blades - What TPI, What Length, and How Many ?

    I am trying to get the "Tool Crib" on our rescue truck stocked a little better.

    Recently I managed to get a DeWalt 24V cordless saw & 110VAC/24VDC converter.

    Now I need blades. I have read enough on these forums to know that we need a High Quality BiMetal (or demolition) blade - my question to you is what size, what TPI and how many ??

    My Inital thoughts (which I am already second guessing) are :

    For mixed metals / plastics (Vehicle Extrication)
    10/14 TPI Variable
    12" Blade - Qty 3
    9" Blade - Qty 6
    6" Blade - Qty 6

    Wood
    5/8 TPI Variable
    12" Blade - Qty 3
    9" Blade - Qty 6
    6" Blade - Qty 6


    Now I ask myself :
    - are these good length/quantity combinations or should I modify these.
    - Do I need a 3rd blade for "Solid" metals (rebar, pipe, thick wall tubing, etc) and if so - what Length & Quantity.

    Also - any suggestions on how to seperate/mark/store/carry all these blades would be greatly appreciated.

    Take Care - Stay Safe
    Stephen
    FF/Paramedic

  • #2
    You Got my Vote Steve. But I would also back those up with a similar quantity in Station, Sometimes these Blades can be hard to come by. As you should always start your calls FRESH make sure you have you can replace what you use each time you go out.

    ------------------
    Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
    Carl D. Avery

    Comment


    • #3
      I would add two blades of at least 18 tpi of each length.

      What brand of blades do you use?

      I also agree with Carl, I try to keep a stash of blades hidden in the station, cause the blades that I like cannot be picked up at evry Home Depot.

      Comment


      • #4
        I would add blades of 4",10" and 12", bi-metal 14-18 tpi. Demolition quality in grade and some smaller wood cutting blades for those tight spots. I would also keep a supply on the rig and in the station. The smaller bi-metal blades work well around the pt. feet in auto ex. and hands in industrial rescues. The long 12" blades can cut down through the door skin,crash barrier and c-post. Looks like you have a good list started, just add a few more blades.

        Comment


        • #5
          Steve, this looks like a good mix of blades. Make sure you go to a recycling yard with your tools and blades and try them on what you want to cut before you need to use them at an actual emergency. We found that the first blades that we purchased were not up to the test. Of particular concern, you should try to cut a side impact bar from a new car. These bars typically are made of boron steel that is rated at 220,000 psi and will tear the teeth off many industrial quality blades. We have found the LAWSON FIRE-RESCUE blade to be very effectice on these bars. Also don't limit your wood blades to just wood. The aggresive teeth on these blades will not clogg with melted plastic, from a dash for example, as quickly as the higher tpi blades. A supply of 18 tpi blades would be suitable on the harder materials you list without imparting excessive vibrations.

          As for storage, we use a tool roll with sleeves for each blade length and tpi with the information clearly printed on the roll for what each blade is supposed to be used for. It is made of a rubberized fabric and was made locally for us to our spec's. The KISS priciple for those of us who don't do this every day.

          Train Hard, Train Safe

          Comment


          • #6
            N2DFire you have a good list. The KISS principle is important too. 18 tpi for thick metal, 10/14 for automotive and 6/8 for wood and plastic. The 6/8 works well for laminated glass too but I prefer the Glassmaster. Just as quick and just as easy to handle. Of course it is more work.

            Watch out for the long blades when there is a victim in close proximity.

            On the technical side - almost all blades are now bi-metal. Bi-metal refers to the manufacturing technique of using a hard steel for the teeth and a flexible steel for the body of the blade. Next time you have worn the paint off a bi-metal, look closely for the weld line about 1/8 inch above the teeth. Yes, the teeth are actually welded to the blade! Gives you the best combination of longer lasting teeth and a more flexible blade.

            "Demolition" or "Rescue" blades are thicker than the regular consumer grade blades. You have to place the two thicknesses next to each other to see the difference but a little extra thickness goes a long way in providing a more durable blade. They utilize the bi-metal manufacturing technique as well and come in all lenghts and tpi. Don't buy anything but demolition blades for rescue work. Most stores can order the heavier duty blades if they don't stock them.


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            • #7
              We use the DeWalt DW938 recip saw and are very satisfied. We bought our blades from www.tylertool.com and they usually have the demolition blades in stock which are sometimes hard to find. We keep a 5 pack of the 8" 10/14, 6" 10/14 and the 12" 6 tpi in the unit, all DeWalt brand. Most of the time we only use the 8" 10/14 tpi.

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              • #8
                The "tool crib" at amazon.com is another good source for demolition blades.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Question, has anyone tried the tungsten carbon blades? I saw some at the local hardware store but didn't look that closely at them. Wonder how they stand up to the other rescue blades.


                  Yes i dug a way back to find this thread. Wanted to make sure it hasn't been discussed before.
                  NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
                  IACOJ Attack

                  Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We use Lenox blades almost exclusivly. As an "all around" blade we have good luck with the 10TPI Fire-Rescue demolition blade. These come in 9 inch lengths. They run about $125 for a pack of 25.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      we have some lenox blades along with some other demo blades of some brand which escapes me right now. they work great and go right through an A post pretty fast so I'm happy with them. Just curious about the tungsten blades. Guess I'll buy some and try them out in a couple of weeks.
                      NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
                      IACOJ Attack

                      Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

                      Comment

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