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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    James, Give Guy Benson with Austin EMS a call. I believe me is still head of the DWI awareness program, and can help you with the "Shattered Dreams" program that you are looking at. I know Lockhart is planning one of these, not sure of the date though.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    i know in my department and other in my area got to gether and constructed a senerio that we actully got the cars on a shootign kinda system that projected cars into each other and then had dummies in there the kids and parents did knwo that they were dummie and some from a far distance didn't really know and after the tremendios crash they some hwo i guess had the kids sneak in the vechile while the main instructer was talkign to the groups and when they started the extricatio nthe groups was freaked about the kids being in the wreck and seeing them bleeding and it being fake blood it was pretty damn real to them, so yes i say get as involved as you can with it take it all the way then hopefully sink in to them and also check and see if you can get a heli to land to get the real efect we also had that plus police if you want try and get everyone to respond in liek its a emergency.johnl-2

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Our volly dept up here in Canada along with MADD, the RCMP and the local EMS staged an accident directly in front of the local high school 2 min. before the lunch hour. The accident was a high speed drivers side tbone 1 person the passenger of the offending car was ejected trough the windshield and was DOA the driver of same car was impaired,cuffed and taken by police. 2 patience were extricated from the other car 1 unconscious, the other very vocal and combative. We used the drama 30 students for victims and they were assisted by a trauma room nurse to put on makeup and did a great job. We also had support people in place mingling amongst the students that had gathered to watch. This was done because of the realistic nature of the exercise. These people took the students aside toward the end of the scene and assured them that this was just an exercise. There were students that were visibly shaken when they saw that the DOA was some one they knew. The whole exercise was topped off when STARS (shock trauma air rescue society) flew in and took the unconscious patience (switched in the back of an ambulance with one of the air crew for liability reasons) and lifted off in a snow storm. That afternoon a number of us went to the school and presented the participating students with a certificate of appreciation for their part in the exercise, and fielded questions from the students. It was in our opinion, a great success because there was not a single mva involving any students from the grad partys that happened that spring. Our dept. plans to do this exercise every three years because we believe that it does have an impact on the students of our community.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    As I recently graduated high school myself, in 1999, it was my personal experience that pictures do help get the message across. But just flashing pictures will not do the job. You must provide hard facts with these images. Facts such as the lifestyles the kids lived, who are in the pictures. This will help the audience relate their lives to the incidents, and make them think twice about their actions. I think another way of approaching this is to get the kids to have some kind of hands on experience. This might include having some students volunteering their time in an ER or a FD and bringing back their experiences to their peers.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    You guy's are not to late. Our committee just had our second meeting. This presentation is called "Shattered Dreams" and it sounds a lot like the feed back I am getting. I have been placed as the Team Leader of the "Mock Crash Team." I have read all the replies and found a lot of good info that will help us in this endeavor.

    Just an update on where we are. The school board has decided to hold this program during "Alcohol Awareness Week" in November instead of before prom as we had hoped. They said there was testing already scheduled then and when we do the program in two years they will make the time then. We will be doing the "Every 15 Minutes" with this presentation, and from a suggestion earlier we plan to use a few kids to demo some of the more common injuries. The kids that will be in the wreck have all been convicted of alcohol related charges and hand picked by the Municipal Judge. The principal at the school is working on the kids names for the Every 15 Minutes and will try to pull at least one of the student from each group. We have already decided that the Captain of the football team will be a quadriplegic. I already have the commitment from the locate helo to be there, and they will try the drunk teenager in the Municipal Courtroom and broadcast it in to the schools on close circuit TV

    That is about as far as we have made it so far. Please keep the input coming as the program is in the early planning stages yet and your suggestions will help.

    ------------------
    SERVING FOR PRIDE
    PROUD TO SERVE!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I might be a little late too, but what the hell, better late than never....

    We do this about every 4 - 5 years for Prom season. Other groups I spoke to found that it waiting the years in between you were getting turn over on the students so that you weren't showing the same kids, the same thing each spring. Looks like it keeps a little higher level of interest.

    My one suggestion is to use students as 'victims.' We have the school principal round up a bunch of students. He generally chooses a representative from the various 'clicks' at the school. He gets the star athlete, the cheerleader, the student council president and so on. This way you stand a better chance of reaching more people with your message since it is their friend in there.

    We generally set it up with kids hitting head on into a family (baby included) with a student laying face on the hood partially ejected. We have a good kit of fake wounds including an amputated hand which really squirts 'blood' -- It seems to be those things, the props, that get the attention. We will generally have at least one fatality, usually the one on the hood so everybody sees the pronouncement by the ME and sees a sheet put over him.

    If you work far enough in advance, we found that we were even able to schedule our local air medical helocopter to make an appearance.

    If you put the time and energy into it, it is a rewarding experience. We have even found that it helps the membership drive for both the juniors program and it actually has gotten a couple of parents and teachers to enroll.

    All and all it's a good experience not to mention good training for your members.

    Good Luck!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I know I am a little late in posting a reply, but, Park City FD (20 miles east of Salt Lake City and host of the 2002 Winter Olympic Games) put on a program of this sort this past spring. They had the students gather on the football field. They set up loud speakers and hooked it into the radio of the FD. They set up 2 cars head-on. Had some outside drama students take part as victims of the wreck. One car had a younger female passenger in the car, concious and breathing. The other occupant was a older female slumped over the steering wheel unconcious obvious DRT. They other car had a female in a prom dress thrown through the windshield and a young man dressed in a tuxedo walking around with no apparent injuries (DUI). They then dispatched fire/ems. The engines and ambulance and law enforcement arrive on scene and go through the accident with extrication/entrapment scenario. They cut the car and everything. DRT's in body bags. They bring in a Air-Med helicopter. It is pretty impressive. They recorded it. You may want to try them and see if they will give you a tape. The tape is only about 10 minutes long. The school set up counciling at the school afterwards. It deterred alot of students from the after affects of the prom. That may be kinda what you are looking for.

    ------------------
    If in doubt - Call us out

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    This seems fitting to add to this post. While my department was not engaged in the incident, I figured I'd pass it along as food for thought.

    This morning at 0133 hrs. in the northern part of Wayne County, Ohio, a single vehicle accident took the lives of 6 teenagers ages 13-18, and left a seventh seriously injured. See http://www.firehouse.com/news/2000/12/27_APcrash.html

    The 18 year old driver apparently was driving at a high rate of speed and failed to negotiate a curve. The 1996 Buick Park Avenue Ultra struck a large tree at the driver's door. None were wearing seat belts, and as best I could tell from reviewing the report, all but 3 were ejected.

    Among the dead were two sisters, ages 13 and 14 and the 14 year old son of a Creston Firefighter. Creston responded to this call, but I am not sure yet if the father was actually on the scene.

    While still under investigation, the Ohio State Highway Patrol's preliminary findings are that unsafe speed caused the accident and no alcohol or drugs are suspected at this time.

    I hope your efforts in educating your students will prevent a tragedy like this one.



    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.


    [This message has been edited by MetalMedic (edited 12-27-2000).]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    The volunteer department which I am on does this every two years. We get two cars from the local scrap yard and stage an accident on the track around the football field, all of the students from grades 7 through 12 are in bleachers to watch. The fire department is paged out and responds as if the accident were real.

    Several of the students are used as victims and placed inside the cars or outside the cars to simulate ejection. One student plays the drunk driver and is arrested at the "scene" and placed in the patrol car. At least one student is a "DOA" and the remaining student victims are extricated from the car just as if the accident had really taken place. Parents are also invited to observe and are often given the role of the upset parent. Medical care is administered while the "victims" are still in the car and extrication is taking place. Once the "victims" are extricated they are placed in squads and the squads leave the track area to simulate transport to the hospital. The student who is "DOA" is covered with a sheet, left in plain view of the student body, and once the demonstration is over and the students return to class, the person who was "DOA" either does not return to school for the day or returns to class but has to act as if they are not there (no interaction of any kind with remaining students or staff). The most seriously injured "victim" is loaded into a medical helicopter and on occasion the helicopter actually leaves the football field with the "victim" inside.

    We have been doing this for the past 10 years and since then have not had a student involved in a drunk driving accident (which they were at fault) since the program started.

    This is not only a good experience for the students involved but it is also good for the fire departments involved. Since we are a small rural volunteer department we call two other departments mutual aid to assist with EMS, extrication, and setting up a landing zone for the helicopter.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    The volunteer department which I am on does this every two years. We get two cars from the local scrap yard and stage an accident on the track around the football field, all of the students from grades 7 through 12 are in bleachers to watch. The fire department is paged out and responds as if the acident were real.

    Several of the students are used as victims and placed inside the cars or outside the cars to simulate ejection. One student plays the drunk driver and is arrested at the "scene" and placed in the patrol car. At least one student is a "DOA" and the remaining student victims are extricated from the car just as if the accident had really taken place. Parents are also invited to observe and are often given the role of the upset parent. Medical care is administered while the "victims" are still in the car and extracation is taking place. Once the "victims" are extricated they are placed in squads and the squads leave the track area to simulate transport to the hospital. The student who is "DOA" is covered with a sheet, left in plain view of the student body, and once the demonstration is over and the students return to class, the person who was "DOA" either does not return to school for the day or returns to class but has to act as if they are not there (no interaction of any kind with remaining students or staff). The most seriously injured "victim" is loaded into a medical helicopter and on occasion the helicopter actually leaves the football field with the "victim" inside.

    We have been doing this for the past 10 years and since then have not had a student involved in a drunk driving accident (which they were at fault) since the program started.

    This is not only a good experience for the students involved but it is also good for the fire departments involved. Since we are a small rural volunteer department we call two other departments mutual aid to assist with EMS, extrication, and setting up a landing zone for the helicopter.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    MetalMedic, I can't say for sure, because I was still in school when it started, but I believe our numbers have decreased. I think anymore, most of the MVA's involve people traveling thru the city or who work in the city. The parents also play a big part in prom night because they usually put together an after-prom party with all kinds of activities and prizes for everyone. I know when I was went to prom, the majority of kids were all at the after-prom instead of out somewhere else. The after-prom started within an hour after prom ended, and ended at 0600. If you weren't there by a certain time or if you left early, your parents were notified. I will see if I can dig up some kind of stats to let you know for sure.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Firenresq77, after doing this for 10 years, have you been able to establish the effectiveness of such a program? Have you had a reduction in high school age kids being involved in DWI and/or high speed crashes since the program began? This age group is a tough nut to crack sometimes. I wonder if you are actually getting throgh to them, or is the presentation just an excuse to get out of class for a good part of the day?



    ------------------
    Richard Nester
    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    This is a very good cause and you should be commended for doing this. It can be time-consuming, but it is worth it. Our department has been doing it for probably the last ten years. Started of every 2 yrs, then the one principal only wanted once every 3-4, but now back to every 2. We have usually 4 students who are our "victims" and we have them placed in the car, covered by a tarp on the football field. Then the kids come out and the accident happens. Everything is done in real time and we get anyone and everyone who would be involved there to play a part. You can email me if you have some questions and I will try to get you some information. [email protected]
    Good luck with it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Thank everyone for your input. This project is very near and dear to so many and we hope to drive home the importance of DUI accidents'.

    Fireboy442 thank you for your feedback. Young adults are very hard to get though to and this is one of the things that will be the most difficult to overcome with the presentation. As it maybe we do have at least 4 people that I can think of off the top of my head that we could ask. If I need any advice for you I will send you an e-mail. Thank for you time and thoughts. It is always' nice in this day and age to see a young man interested in the service!

    Capt. Clay thank you for your post. I will try to get in touch with the people in San Marcos and get over there to see their presentation.

    Sorry that I don't have time to say thank you to everyone individually, but to:
    Sccarescue,Bikefire,ccsr12,HYTHE FIRE DEPARTMENT,ElmerA,Rirstin,Mark/cvarc, and F52 Westside. THANK YOU ALL!!

    ------------------
    SERVING FOR PRIDE
    PROUD TO SERVE!

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    James, I would suggest contacting the San Marcos Fire Department. They have been putting on a presentation for the last few years concerning this issue. The whole thing is called "Shattered Dreams" and is a two day event. The first day involves the student body witnessing the wreck from the time of the first arriving engine on, including the makeup and transport, extrication,etc.. Through out the same day, someone dressed as the Grim Reaper removes a student from class every fifteen minutes showing how often a person dies from DWI. The student is out of school for the rest of the day and put with the rest of the "victims" to reflect on what is going on. The victims spend the night secluded from everyone, including their parents, and write down their thoughts on the subject. Their parents, in turn, do the same as if their children were taken from them. The next day at a school assembly, some of the "victims" and parents stories are read to the student body.
    I personally haven't witnessed this program, but this year I am trying to participate in it since my dept. surrounds the city and we see a lot of the wrecks. It is supposed to happen March 7-8, I believe, and sounds like something worth checking out. Hope this helps.

    ------------------
    Be safe, have fun!
    Captain Clay Rheinlander
    South Hays Fire & Rescue
    LEATHER FOREVER!!

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