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Chainsaws for Auto extrication

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  • #16
    We currently don't carry a dedicated vent cutting saw, only the run of the mill chainsaw. For operations that require cutting into metal we either use the "chopsaw" (disc cutter) or sawzall. In a recent practice rollover sequence we cut the floor pan of the Mazda pickup initially using the chopsaw, but found it didn't have depth of cut for the frame rails. The sawzall "saved" the day and chewed through like melting butter.

    It would seem that the main point here is: it's another tool in the box. And definitely something to consider for the training ground prior to field use.
    If you don't do it RIGHT today, when will you have time to do it over? (Hall of Fame basketball player/coach John Wooden)

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    impossible solved cotidie. miracles postulo viginti - quattuor hora animadverto

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    • #17
      Innovative idea. I wonder how many chains they went through when they trained on this concept. I am not certain I would use our Stihl Chain saw for this as a primary cutting device druing this particular evolution UNLESS I have practiced/trained at it a few times. I am guessing too that the roof of this "Conversion Van" was fiberglass and not metal. Although I have used the saw venting a metal roof several times at fires. I see a few differences though (apples and oranges so to speak. Like someone else already mentioned this is a another tool in the tool box. I also applaud the ingenuity IF if was the safest last resort.
      "Making Sense with Common Sense"
      Motor Vehicle Rescue Consultants
      ( [email protected]) Jordan Sr.

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      • #18
        I never thought of using the chainsaw to cut fiberglass...would work pretty well. We carry a chainsaw on our rescue truck mostly to deal with accidents off the road into the bush and with logging trucks that flop into the ditch. I understand alot of guys don't deal with a fully loaded logging truck an a daily basis but we have about a dozen or more sawmills in our area so there is considerable heavy truck traffic. When a logging truck hits the ditch the load usually goes through the back of the cab (unless the driver is driving with his pins pulled) somethimes a truck cab is covered in logs 5 feet deep. Anyone here want to try and lift and stabilize 20 or 30 logs? Didn't thinks so. So we use the chain saw to make a little fire wood and clear an area to extricate the patient.

        Still nver though of using a chainsaw in fiberglass. We have a saw-z-all but now I guess I have another trick in the bag.

        Shane
        It don't take a genius to spot a goat in a flock of sheep

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