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  • Best extrication tool

    Our local vehicular extrication responses for last year-1999 was 13. Just 3 days ago is was our last extrication response where a male passenger in a truck was pinned in his seat.
    We are planning to purchase new extrication tool. My questions are:
    1. What do you think is the best there is on the planet?
    2. Where can we find the jaws of life? Is it a brand or something else.
    3. Are there extri. tool which can be operated by a generator or the like?
    Any other info are welcome.
    Thanks

    ------------------
    DNovis
    AVFB, Philippines

  • #2
    Altruist, welcome to the forums.
    1. What's the best tool on the planet? Thats a loaded question. Look at the other posts in this section and you will get everyone's opinion. The best tool is the one you and your dept. decide will best fit your needs, and can get the best price and service from. Use the internet to contact the manufacturers for a dealer in the general area of the Philippines. I'm sure that they'll be glad to help.
    2. The jaws of life has become the media's calling of all hydraulic rescue tools. The original (I think) was Hurst many years ago.
    3. Most hydraulic tools can have multiple sources of powering them available for purchase. Gas powered, electric powered, and even foot powered.
    4. The most important thing about a hydraulic rescue tool is the training of it's operators. The second most important thing is what is called here "thinking out of the box". Don't get stuck in the mindset of doing things one way. For example, If a door just isn't going to open go to the roof. A rescuers mind is full of ideas. Also train, train, and train. Training helps the most when it's crunch time.
    Good luck and stay safe!

    Comment


    • #3
      resqb puts it quite well... Open questions like yours can start a snow ball effect. I do want to clarify that "Jaws of Life" is a registered trademark for the Hurst Rescue Tool. It has gone the same route as "Kleenex" has for facial tissue and "Dixie Cup" has for the paper cup.

      I sent my reply off-line to avoid the fray. That way the poster can also print the replies and compare apples to apples. I would suggest everyone else consider doing the same.

      As I have said before, while I do have a favorite tool, I know all can do the job when used by people that know how to use them and know the limitations of that tool.

      ------------------
      Richard Nester
      Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.


      [This message has been edited by MetalMedic (edited February 13, 2000).]

      Comment


      • #4
        Our rescue unit averages around 35-40 extrications a year. Although each incident has its own characteristics, I figure that there are three main tools that are required for 80-90% of the scenes we work: A combo cutter/spreader, a recip. saw, and a hydraulic ram. Of course, this does not include stabilization items, boards, chains, etc. Budget-wise, a combo cutter/spreader tool is fine (some may argue with this and that is okay), several hack-saws are much cheaper than a recip saw(we use both at the same time)and when used efficiently can do an acceptable job. I have seen very few instances where a ram would not work to move a dash, but a chain wrap was impossible. I highly suggest a ram of some sort is purchased. In the end, the greatest tools in the world will not extricate a victim. Training and practice are the only answers to a quick and SAFE extrication. Good luck and GOD BLESS!

        Comment


        • #5
          Good replies from the others, I have a couple of things to add:

          Talk to your neighboring departments and find out what they use then set up a meeting with them. Have them demontrate the tool or better yet invite you over for an extrication drill so you can get some experience with diffrent tools.

          Secondly - A dealer in your area may be willing to bring tools out to you for show and tell and demonstration. If you can swing it, get a hold of car that can be cut up and start lining up the manufacturers to come demo them.

          We played with 3 different tools before we made our last purchase. We carry more tools than we need - a large spreader, a combination cutter spreader, a straight cutter, 3 rams of various sizes plus all the hand tools, cribbing and what not. I purposely did not mention the brand so as not to jade your evaluations.

          Good luck, let us know how you make out.

          Comment


          • #6
            All the manufacturers of extrication equipment make good equipment. The "best" is that which fits your circumstances. One thing you may wish to keep in mind is support/repair. Contact all the manufacturers and request that they set up a demonstration. Those that are able to do so wil most likely do a better job of servicing your equipment. Do not buy anything without trying it first, no matter what anyone in these forums say. If noone responds, send a member to observe some of the extrication competitions. Good Luck. Capt. Dan

            Comment


            • #7
              I think everyone who has responded needs to be applauded for what each of them has said. No one started the contest of which tool is best, which is worse, why, how, and for how long. Everyone is right.

              The differences between each tool are subtle, and, each has it's own strengths. As everyone else has said, the best tool is the one that best suits your needs.

              Thanks for the nice, enjoyable forum w/o any arguing.

              Comment


              • #8
                I agree with BriTHFD:
                "Thanks for the nice, enjoyable forum w/o any arguing."

                I had a real fear that this would become a real flaming spectacular. Just goes to show you that we are all professionals. This is why I am proud to call all of you my brothers and sisters. I look forward to the knowledge I gain from this forum every day.

                Keep up the good work... and keep it safe!



                ------------------
                Richard Nester
                Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Awesome! Without getting off the subject for too long, this has been the most objective and informative line of posts I think I've ever seen. All the above people deserve an atta-boy. All are correct - go with what you feel you need to get the job done in your circumstances. Not to beat it to death, but the most pertinent point is to train, practice, think about how else you can get the objective accomplished, and then start the process over again. One of our platoon chiefs has often said he would much rather have a well-trained small group of people with modest equipment who are good with what they have, than a whole bunch of people with all the toys in the world and hardly a clue as to what they are doing. Again, listen to all the advise above - it is excellent. Good luck and stay safe.

                  ------------------
                  R.A. Ricciuti, Firefighter
                  Mt. Lebanon Fire Department
                  www.mtlfd.org

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    I'm going to tip my cards... but since we are posting websites here... don't forget this one.. http://www.phoenixrescue.com/


                    ------------------
                    Richard Nester
                    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      I think you will not find a better operating tool than the LUKAS rescue tools.

                      LUKAS has a full time staff of 36 people working in research and developement of tools.

                      Check out their web site at WWW.LUKAS.COM

                      See for your self what sets LUKAS out in front.

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        ACK!!!! Here come the salesmen!!!



                        ------------------
                        Richard Nester
                        Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Great To Read A Post That Didn't Turn Into A Big Brand Name Debate, Although I Do See That Post A Few More Topics Down. Anyhow, That Main Thing To Look For In Extrication Tools Would Be Service. We Had A Good Set Of Tools But The Rep Closed Shop And The Nearest Service Shop Was a 3 Days's Drive. We Switched Brands And We've Had No Problems With Them. Anyway, What I'm Trying To Say Is Service Should Be #1 With Everything Coming Next!

                          Ryan
                          [email protected]

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Great To Read A Post That Didn't Turn Into A Big Brand Name Debate, Although I Do See That Post A Few More Topics Down. Anyhow, That Main Thing To Look For In Extrication Tools Would Be Service. We Had A Good Set Of Tools But The Rep Closed Shop And The Nearest Service Shop Was a 3 Days's Drive. We Switched Brands And We've Had No Problems With Them. Anyway, What I'm Trying To Say Is Service Should Be #1 With Everything Else Coming Next!

                            Ryan
                            [email protected]

                            Comment

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