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POSITIVE Comparison of hydraulic systems

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  • POSITIVE Comparison of hydraulic systems

    To everyone who has used more than one type of hydraulic extrication tool:
    Having recently been involved in obtaining replacement extrication equipment, and having a long-standing curiosity about anything to do with extrication and getting my patient to definitive care within my 10 minutes of the Golden Hour......How about putting down what we like about our preferred systems? I'm not talking about running someone else's system down, any moron can gripe, all manufacturers make good equipment- each with it's own strong points and idiosynrasies. We chose Holmatro for several reasons- Speed, Weight and ergonomics. By ergonomics I mean that the tools were well balanced and easy to manipulate in awkard positions. TNT also displayed these good qualities but was unable to supply multi-staged rams or warranty their equipment if used with someone else's. Of course noone will warranty someone else's equipment. Hurst Showed us some very robust equipment and we have 2 sets that have lasted a long time. Curtiss Wright demonstrated a very compact electrical system that is ultra-light and very strong for it's size. Our current frontline system is an Amkus system and is still operable after many years. Anybody else have something GOOD to say about Any system? The more viewpoints, the better. Capt. Dan

  • #2
    Dan,
    Our department uses LUKAS. I find LUKAS has all the same advantages you mentioned about the Holmotro with one additional. The control valve is used by moving your thumb and it is 360 degrees. The advantage is once you are comfortable, ergonomic wise, you dont turn you whole hand. Just activate your thumb. The control valve is "reachable" regardless of the position of the tool. Look at them all and make up your own mind. I still like my LUKAS tool over them all.

    skip rupert
    [email protected]

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    • #3
      As some of you have figured out by now, I am sold on Pheonix Tools. I prefer low pressure since the laws of physics dictate that the high volume of fluid is what it takes to provide consistent force on a hydrailic cylinder. I like the 35 pound spreader which is a very comfortable weight to work with. The Phoenix is the only rescue tool with a combination tool that has field replacable cutting blades that doesn't require complete replacement of a spreader arm should you break one. The Phoenix is the only tool with the fixed blade continuous cutter (C/C) that allows you to more quickly make long cuts when necessary. The Phoenix Straight Blade (SB) Cutter is innovative with it's combinations cutter/spreader design that allows you to use your cutter to make some spreads when you need to in a cutting situation. The Phoenix uses ethal glycol as its primary fluid. Ethyl Glycol is non-flammible and can be mixed with water if needed should you run low on fluid for some reason. Ethyl Glycol taste horrible, but you can drink it safely (i.e. it isn't poisonous). Silicon spray, soapy water and dry towels are all you need to completely clean the units (Phoenix is also more than happy to use Phospahate Ester or Mineral Oil for hydraulic fluid if that is what you really want). The simo power unit Phoenix offers is a true simo where both outputs offer full pressure to drive two tools at the same time. No smoke and mirrors of a junction box and such. The Phoenix is the exclusive tool used on U.S. Navel vessels because of many of these properties that makes them ideal for use on a ship. The Phoenix Super-Ram with it's 2-stage 25 inch to 60 inch span is an awsome piece of equipment. Their sales philosophy is to let you compare and make your own decision. I have worked with a Phoenix Rep. and have found that they make it a point not to bad-mouth other tools, but prefer to stand on their own merits. The Phoenix bears a lot of resemblance to the Hurst Tools and for good reason. F.M. Brick, who designed the Phoenix Tools, was formerly an engineer for Hurst. He moved on to start his own company when Hurst did not support his R&D Efforts for such things as the C/C Cutter and replaceable cutting blades on a combination spreader/cutter (Or, a Rescue Tool as Phoenix likes to call it). I have helped out in the Heavy Rescue classes at the State Fire School in Ohio. We have used several hydrailic tools during these schools, so I feel I have done some valid comparrison. My observations were that all tools accomplished the tasks they were given. So it falls back to what you feel comfortable with AND what you train with.

      ------------------
      Richard Nester
      Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.



      [This message has been edited by MetalMedic (edited January 27, 2000).]

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      • #4
        Hi!

        I am a big Holmato fan. We have been using Holmatro since we started extrication 12 years ago. To keep from having to repeat all of the advantages that you have previously stated, which are all 100% true, there are other advantages to Holmatro. Holmatro is the only tool that has met U.L. standards, and have met these standards for the past two to three years. They have a lifetime warranty that can't be beat. Our maintenance representative is great, and that is a major factor in us remaining with Holmatro. N.F.P.A either has, or is developing a standard for hydraulic extrication equipment, and according to our rep. Holmatro has to do little changing to meet these standards. I teach different types of extrication classes for our area, and before I started I attended several schools on the east coast, and had an oppurtunity to use serveral different tools, and I would still choose Holmatro. Granted that all of these tools were used in a training enviroment, and not in an emergency situation. Which means when the chips are down, I might have found an advantage with some of these tools that I didn't notice on the training ground. But the tool that I have used in the field, Holmatro, does the job, and does it well.

        I am sure that there are other rescue personnel that feel just as strongly about their favorite rescue tool, as I do about Holmatro, so listen to them all, and then choose for yourself.

        Good Luck, and post what you decide.

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        • #5
          Eons ago, we selected HURST as our primary tools following a comprehensive evaluation of the competators available back then...and the HURST tools performed very well for us.

          About 5 years ago, the need for updated equipment became apparant, so we undertook the same type of evaluation process for tools available in our area. This time, we went with AMKUS. Last fall, the process was again repeated, and AMKUS came out on top for us again.

          Essentially we found that all the systems performed very well, but AMKUS got the nod because of the superior customer service and support they provide in our neck of the woods. On those occasions when a problem arose with the equipment, our service rep was right there with a replacement unit - no questions asked.

          Training is the key to competency with whatever tools you have - and customer service and support is the key to customer satisfaction. AMKUS get an +A in our books.

          BE SAFE!

          ------------------


          [This message has been edited by Diesel (edited January 28, 2000).]

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          • #6
            Anyone ever use Kinman equipment? Or Nike hand pump powered hydraulics?

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            • #7
              I am a big Hurst fan, cause we have never broke ANYTHING in 25 years. But the other week I was introduced to TNT rescue tools, saying I was impressed is an understatement, these tools performed like our Hurst tools, only lighter.

              New york E.S.U. just switched to TNT combi tools and pumps, after many years of Hurst use, the reason is TNTs customer service.

              I hear that FDNY will be switching to TNT soon.

              I also like the fact that TNT tools can be built for 10,500 p.s.i. or 5,000 p.s.i. I think that phoenix is the only other tool that does that.

              MetalMedic does your rescue carry replacement cutter blades onboard?

              TNT will have a rep at your station fixing your tool within six hours of your call, if they cant fix it they will leave a loaner for you, now Im sure everybodys rep says that, but how many have come through?

              I have used Holmatro, Amkus, Genesis, Hurst, and TNT, since we arent griping about tools I will say these positive things about Holmatro, and Genesis, they are light, and fast.

              I almost forgot, check the price of TNT tools against your current brand, and I think you will be surprised.

              Comment


              • #8
                RSQLT43 asks:
                "MetalMedic does your rescue carry replacement cutter blades onboard?"

                The answer is, YES. All it takes is an hex wrence to change one if it happens to break. Not to big of a deal. We never broke one, but we upgraded to the new serrated blades recently and keep the smooth blades on the rig for spares.



                ------------------
                Richard Nester
                Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

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                • #9
                  Has anyone bought Hurst's little electric unit? Any Kudos or catcalls? Anybody ever get brave enough to order those European "Vympnel" explosive powered shears- sort of like the over priced "Life Shear"?

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