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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    The original question was about fogging of protective eye equipment. Try a product called Kat Krap. Comes in a little plastic container, you smear some on the inside and your stuff won't fog up. Most ski shops will have this.

    Elmer "Andy" Anderson, NREMT
    Mountain Ambulance Service http://www.rescue70.org

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    We do not allow face shields to serve as eye protection. UVEX glasses or goggles are required if you are anywhere near the hot zone. The croakies work great, and if you do lose them you can replace the lenses for $5 or less. Since we buy our own, that's a good thing.

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    Susan Bednar
    Captain - Forsyth Rescue
    North Carolina Strike Force 1

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    At a drill my partner got sprayed with glass from a cars rear window. He DID have his visor down. He's fine, but it was a shock to both of us. About that sametime I started carrying/wearing UVEX safety goggles. At some bad calls I've used them with the visor down. I get harrased, but is worth an eye. Like my father says, "All fun and games, until someone loses an eye".

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I wear eyeglasses. Have had trouble finding a style of goggle that 1) fits over my eyeglasses and 2) will not fog up. The problem is my glasses fog up inside the goggles. Any suggestions or others with the same problem?

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    The sticker on the visors states it is not adequate eye protection. I use goggles attached to the helmet. I purchased them myself, its my eyes. There should be a standard for all departments.

    Mike McNamara

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    We have Cairns Phenix helmets with safety goggles-no shields at all. The goggles would be okay if A) they came in different sizes and B) the lenses didn't get crappy right off the bat. I'm a pinhead, and when I wear them, I feel like I did when I was three and put on my mommy's Jackie O sunglasses. Ours are mounted on the helmets where a shield would normally go. They supposedly have a protective coating on them, but mine look like they've been cleaned with Brillo. I've never cleaned them with anything but dishwashing detergent and warm water, either. Maybe it would help if they weren't on there all the time-I'm always having to clean insulation and plaster out of them after fires, but I swear those goggles look like I've been grinding them into the dirt. Wearing them on an extrication, where I really want to be able to see, is a royal pain-cheap safety glasses in the turnout coat pocket is the way to go.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    We don't use our helmet shields as protection at traffic accidents when using hydraulic cutting gear, they don't comply with safety standards (UK). We are issued with safety glasses which are kept in a soft case and put into your tunic pocket.

    That seems great, until you go into search & rescue mode and they get broken. As it's personall issue it's not kept on the appliance. Now looking at using personall kit bags to hold all your PPE's.

    You only have one set of eyes, look after them. In a fraction of a second it could all go black - for life. Use the best available if you can

    Kindest regards and stay safe

    Les (UK)

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    THE COMMENTS ABOVE ARE RIGHT INLINE. THE FACE SHIELD IS VIRTUALLY NON-COMPLIANT TO OSHA AND ANSI STANDARDS. TRULY IN ESSENCE IT IS A LIGHT DEBRIS AND H20 DEFLECTOR. MAKE SURE WHATEVER EYE PROTECTION YOU GO WITH IS: ANSI Z87.1 COMPLIANT. THIS IS THE STANDARD THAT REGULATES THE IMPACT RESISTANCE OF EYE PROTECTION. YOU WILL IN MOST CASES FIND THIS STANDARD STAMPED SOMEWHERE ON THE GLASSES.. GOOD LUCK AND AS ALWAYS, STAY SAFE

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Our SOP's say that safety glasses are necessary for anyone who is working within 10 feet of the vechile. At the 1999 Atlantic Extrication Competiton it was stated that a lowered visor is not considered sufficient eye protection, and that glasses/goggles should be used with/in place of a visor.

    If Any Additional Info Is Needed Contact:

    Ryan Duggan
    [email protected]


    [This message has been edited by Rubarb (edited March 14, 2000).]

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I know this is going to sound odd, and I too thought it was very strange when I first heard it. I decided to try it anyway, and it worked. I used to ski quite a bit and a friend of mine told me to try rubbing potatoe skins on the inside and outside of the ski goggles. Much to my suprise this actually worked!! My friend stated that he used to play hockey quite a bit and that's how they prevented there shields from fogging up. There may be something else out there now, but believe it or not the potatoe skins worked!!!!

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    Thank You

    John Benik

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I agree with those above, that the standard fire-helmet faceshield provides inadequate protection for vehicle extrication and rescue. As a matter of fact, OSHA does not even approve faceshields as proper eye protection for for extrication.
    Personally, I carry a pair of UVEX safety glasses with side protection for vehicle extrication and rescue. I keep this attached to my helmet with a strap, and, yes, I do lose them sometimes. However, these glasses are not very expensive and I feel that they are worth the money for such protection.
    This is just my 2 cents worth. Everyone does things differently, but from my experience and knowledge, faceshields are not the way to go.

    As a quickie, I have found that the anit-fog solutions don't work very well just as mentioned above.



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    Todd Metzger
    [email protected]
    RRFD, 422
    Senior Firefighter/Engineer/Mentor Coordinator
    Training Committee
    MO Region I Coordinator Admin. Asst.
    Firefighter I & II


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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I wear a New Yorker and keep my safety glasses around my neck with one of those little "croakies" straps..of course i wear them when i need to! I hate goggles.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I agree that safety glasses/goggles are the best way to go because debris can still get to your eyes with your shield down. Our SOP's require all members of the crew in the action circle to have safety glasses on and shields down. We have both types - glasses and goggles. Most wear the glasses but still complain about those fogging up also. We have tried the anti-fog products with little luck. Remember that safety glasses alone do not provide any face protection though.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I think the regular face shields are inadequate at protecting our eyes from flying debris!!! glasses are good, gogles are better. I am trying to convince our Dept. to purchase the new goggles that are simlair to ski goggles. The last time I looked they are only $25-$30 per pair. My dept. won't let us buy them on our own.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest started a topic Eye Protection

    Eye Protection

    At last night's extrication training, it was 25 degrees. While working the jaws, I had a real tough time keeping my face shield clear from fog caused by my exhale if air. TARS s.o.p. is shields down at all times (I agree with this). I have considered getting safety goggles or safety glasses to wear to solve this problem. What do ya'll think?

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