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  • Rescue Pumpers

    To All: I thought I'd just post this question on here and see what everyone else thinks... A discussion has begun in the middle of our department or Replacing our current Heavy Rescue with a Rescue Pumper and using that for our accident scences on the Highway. My question is during the daytime we have a lack of manpower as is the case in most Volunteer Departments across the country, If the truck responds does it become commited as your rescue or as your engine on the scence of an accident???
    NYS FF1/AEMT-CC
    IAEP Local 152
    "You stopped being in charge when I showed up"

  • #2
    I don't know how your company does things. But, I know that my company which responds to over 60 MVC's amonth has 2 rescue/pumpers. See there is a differance between a Rescue/Pumper and A Pumper/Rescue. We have Rescue/Pumpers. We have looking to replace 1 as a heavy rescue and the second as an engine. The only problem with the rescue/pumper that we have found is the lack of compartment space. With water and pump it kills the compartment space. on our rescue/pumpers we have 4 compartments on the officers side and only 3 on the drivers side.

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    • #3
      We use a rescue pumper and we are very pleased with it, it's versitility maximizes your personal. I would say the unit has to fulfil the Priority of the Mission as dictated by the scenario presented. When enver possible we do run a 1 ton 4 door pick (primarily an EMS vehicle) up as a 2 piece rescue company ( the Rescue Pumper and and the EMS unit). As to compartment space, there is now way that a RP can match a BLS (NOT BASIC LIFE SUPPORT... But BLOCK LONG SQUAD) I fully believe that a RP can be engineered to handle the intial Responce on the vast majority of calls. Now those Departments that are well equiped and ready to handle virtually ANY ememergency, I say to you consider a RP and a compartmentize of Box typ type vehicle to deliver all your toys. think about it. How much are you carrying on your BLOCK LONG SQUAD, do you need RIGHT NOW! A secondary support unit with only a driver could run as the back up, Extending it further, those of you living in the North East or any place where there are narrow streets and Scene access is an issue, do you really need all that there or could the rest of the "stuff" be parked around a corner Secured in a vehicle of much Lower cost than the HUGE SQUADS that cost HUGE ammounts of Money. OK that is my soap box, I try to keep my eyes open and would love to hear anyone's pros or cons on this.
      Rescue is the Art & Science of matching your tools, talents and tricks to needs of our customers!
      Carl D. Avery

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      • #4
        I'm not saying you need a huge squad. You need a truck that fits the needs of your company/department. In my company the rescue/pumpers are not quite filling our needs anymore. They did when they were both bought in 1991. But, Are district has out grown them. When looking to buy a new rescue. Make sure you just dont buy it for now, but for the life of the rescue. in 1991 we went from a 1966 Ford Box Rescue to 2 Pierce Rescue/Pumpers. At first they were fine. But now 12 years later they are packed with equipment. When my company starts looking into a new Squad (around 2008), I hope this time we think this out and try to buy a truck that isnt out grown as fast as the ones we have now. ]
        Just remember the needs of your department, the needs of your local, think about what is going to change in your local in the need 15,20,25 years (or how ever long you plan on having this Squad), Make sure by the trucks 5th year its not packed and has no room to grow

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        • #5
          Rescue pumpers or squengines as I like to call them are good extracation piece. They are good at what they a built for.The company that I volly at has a wet rescue with 300 gal of water and 250 pump along with every other tool that a good heavy rescue should have. The reasons for building it this way are the same as you lack of day time staffing. I think that you need take a honest look at your calls and find what best suits your needs. We have had a couple of calls after clearing a mva that proved the need for the water on the piece.

          rescueraver

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          • #6
            We recently bought two 6-man cab rescue pumpers (twins), setup to function as full structural pumpers, but with more compartment space than most rigs. We did this by going with two hydraulic ladder racks (carrying two 14', one 24', and one 35'), which doesn't eat up real estate down the side of the body, or make the hosebed 10' in the air. They have rear mount pumps (1500 gpm), 500 of water, 100 of foam (15 gal class A, 85 gal of 1% class B). The operators panel is inside the left rear compartment, with all the big intakes and discharges on the rear. The rear-mount pump only requires about 1/2 the space of a midship. The hosebed still has room for 1200' of 5", a 3" 'step gun' line, spare 2-1/2" hose, along with three 1-3/4" and one 2-1/2" crosslays. The trucks have 4 rollup doors down each side. Add in a Holmatro combi-tool on a 100' reel with an electric pump; a 15,000 watt AMPS generator; 6000 watts of scene lighting; DeWalt kit with sawzall, circular saw, drill, and on-board charger; Glas-Master and small hand tools; 4 step chocks and 2 bags of cribbing; three 5 gallon jugs of oil dry; traffic cones; a jumpkit, AED, & O/2, and we've got everything we need to at least "get started", if not handle about 80-90% of our vehicle accidents.

            On any run that is reported "with entrapment", the rescue truck (with a full set of hyrdaulic tools, more cribbing, airbags, winch, etc) follows the engine out the door. The rescue also goes if vehicles are reported unstable, a pedestrian is involved, or there is any inkling on dispatch that this is a serious collision. The presence of a fully equipped structural pumper with foam is a major plus should a fire result or a fuel spill occur; it also allows us to respond to the next call ready for bear.

            BTW, the rescue has a 250 pump and 200 of water - a little lean for something burning, but still better than an extinguisher. When we replace it in about 3 years, it's a good bet that it will still have a small pump and some water on it, just in case.
            R.A. Ricciuti
            Mt. Lebanon Fire Department

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            • #7
              Take A Look........

              www.gdvfd18.com
              Never use Force! Get a Bigger Hammer.
              In memory of
              Chief Earle W. Woods, 1912 - 1997
              Asst. Chief John R. Woods Sr. 1937 - 2006

              IACOJ Budget Analyst

              I Refuse to be a Spectator. If I come to the Game, I'm Playing.

              www.gdvfd18.com

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              • #8
                We're a small rural department with limited daytime manpower and our calls have increased to about 50% auto accidents at this time, and we see this trend towards traffic related responses continuing to rise. This is not interstate, multi-car pile ups, but a combination of commuter, tourist and a heavily used truck corridor. We are exploring a small rapid response truck, perhaps on a Ford 550 chassis w/ 4 wheel drive for the snow and ice, with CAFS and about 250 gallons of water, a preconnected combi tool and trash line in the front bumper, room for 2 airpacks and some basic firefighting and extrication tools. We are thinking that this would be the first out truck for just about everything, with appropriate backup to suit the nature of the call. Any thoughts...I know there are a couple of these out there...read about one in Larry Davis' new rural firefighting book.

                Comment


                • #9
                  F550 Rescue/First response

                  You situation sounds similar to the one here. A community of ~10000 with lots of 2lane hiway around.

                  Here is a pic of our new Crash/first response truck.

                  http://www.drum-fire.org/apparatus.htm

                  Front of box is crew/command compartment with 4 BA's into the seats.

                  Outer compartments hold extrication tools, Generator, blocking, lights, etc. Main rear compartment has airbags, hazmat suits, spill cleanup, spare air bottles etc.

                  Goes to all calls as first response with Pumper.

                  Truck was designed in house.
                  SRFD905 - Serving since 1998

                  *~-|EGH|FTM|-~*

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    F550 Rescue/First response

                    You situation sounds similar to the one here. A community of ~10000 with lots of 2lane hiway around.

                    Here is a pic of our new Crash/first response truck.

                    http://www.drum-fire.org/apparatus.htm

                    Front of box is crew/command compartment with 4 BA's into the seats.

                    Outer compartments hold extrication tools, Generator, blocking, lights, etc. Main rear compartment has airbags, hazmat suits, spill cleanup, spare air bottles etc.

                    Goes to all calls as first response with Pumper.

                    Truck was designed in house.
                    SRFD905 - Serving since 1998

                    *~-|EGH|FTM|-~*

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      here you go...

                      http://cms.firehouse.com/forums2/sho...threadid=34409


                      the question has been answered for you here..
                      Peace to our fallen brothers...

                      9/11/01 NYC WTC

                      7/4/02 Gloucester City, NJ

                      -=IACOJ=- The proof is in the crust

                      ......Work hard, play hard, and always have fun along the way......

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