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  • Vehical Stabilization-Glass Control

    Can anyone tell me what you are using to spray on tempered glass for stabilization during auto-ex? We are currently using a "3M" brand spray on adhesive and have been questioned on flamability. Also is there some other product that dries or cures faster, or just simply works better? We are wiling to try a few new ideas. Thanks Kernal

  • #2
    I think most of those spray adheshive cans say things like "WARNING- EXPLOSIVE" or "MAY CAUSE FLASH FIRE AND KILL YOU!!![/b]. Be carful.
    Even the burger-flippers at McDonald's probably have some McWackers.

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    • #3
      ??????????

      I know this might sound like a dumb question,but here goes.
      Huh??? what do you use the spray for?

      Comment


      • #4
        Kernal.

        Stop using the spray.

        The Warning the nmfire stated above is a good and reasonable warning. There are several options that have much less risk than using a potential flame thrower.

        Here are a few things we do to remove "safety"/tempered glass. Try making a "temporary" laminate for an extrication evolution using
        1) Duct tape (make a "Frame & Handle") see the attached photo

        or use----> 2) Shelving paper/plastic (clear stuff is available this stuff works great) When the weather will NOT allow the adhesive stuff to stick to the window on the outside remember there is an inside of the window too. Just push it out.

        and----> 3) Floor mats (most vehicles have floors mats, so I teach the fellas to use what is available. Place the floor mats inside the window when breaking and push it out as it breaks)

        Be safe.

        Fraternally, JT
        Attached Files
        "Making Sense with Common Sense"
        Motor Vehicle Rescue Consultants
        ( [email protected]) Jordan Sr.

        Comment


        • #5
          If all else fails, make entry to the patient by a window away from the patient. take a tarp or "aluminized extrication blanket" into the vehicle and cover the patient. Then break the glass out. This will eliminate an extra step in the process by tying up valuable time taping windows. I have tried the duct tape idea before and always end up with about half the window falling off the "device" that is created. To me, just cover the patient as well as possible and go from there. Save time and manpower.

          If nothing else, break the glass and make a small hole near the top and pull the glass out with a gloved hand as much as possible.

          By the way, in 9 years of this stuff, I have never heard nor seen the floor mat idea! I LIKE IT! Guess I never thought of that before! Just goes to show that even instructors can learn new tricks!
          Tell me, I will forget. Show me, I will remember. Involve me, I will understand.

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          • #6
            i've seen tape guns used and so far it's been one of the best ideas i've seen. have also heard of people using the adhesive paper kinda like fly paper.

            wasn't something like shaving cream mentioned in a thread similar to this awhile back?
            NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
            IACOJ Attack

            Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

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            • #7
              I guess Im lucky on this one,in Florida ,almost every vehicle
              has tinted windows.The film holds everything in place.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RyanEMVFD
                wasn't something like shaving cream mentioned in a thread similar to this awhile back?
                Probably more than once.

                The shaving cream is used when (Laminate / Safety) glass is being removed with a saw. Place a line of shaving cream along the intended path of the saw then saw through the middle of the shaving cream strip. This helps to trap the glass dust & chips rather than letting them loose into the Pt. / Rescuer area.
                Take Care - Stay Safe - God Bless
                Stephen
                FF/Paramedic
                Instructor

                Comment


                • #9
                  ok that makes more sense then what i was thinking of. whew i was confused there for a bit. thanks
                  NREMT-P\ Reserve Volunteer Firefighter\Reserve Police Officer
                  IACOJ Attack

                  Experts built the Titanic, amateurs built the Ark.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Tape, shelving paper, spray adhesives are all probably really neat ideas. Unfortunately, most crashes I have been on happen in the rain or the snow... all of these things don't seem to stick real well when you put them on wet glass.

                    I prefer controlling the glass by breaking it with a center punch and then GENTLY pushing it in or pulling it out of the car, depending on which option seems best at the time. The goal is to keep the glass from shattering and flying throughout the passenger compartment. So, if you can break it and keep most of it out of the way, you have accomplished that task.
                    Richard Nester
                    Orrville (OH) Fire Dept.

                    "People don't care what you know... until they know that you care." - Scott Bolleter

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                    • #11
                      Speaking of window punches. After dozens of center punches that always seem to fail when needed the most, I just received a center punch that one has to pull back and release that works everytime. I do not have the name or manufacture, but I will never own another center punch that you "push". At a recent extrication competition, I witnessed two different teams "breaking glass" with a spring loaded center punch only to have it go "click" with no glass breakage.

                      The Res-Q-wrench carbide striker works everytime too, but it seems to launch a little too much glass inside the vehicle.

                      Thoughts?


                      Daniel Furseth
                      DeForest WI Fire/EMS
                      www.deforestfire.com
                      Daniel Furseth
                      DeForest (WI)
                      Safe And Fast Extrication, Inc.
                      www.besafeinc.org

                      "Extrication is like jazz. Improvisation based on fundamentals"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I agree with Dan's above post... same experience here. I'm a big fan of the pull-and-release style punches, and have had good luck with the res-q-me tool. One guy in the area has one of these little things mounted on a retractable lanyard. Makes for easy and fast use, and less likely to lose it.

                        One other thing I didn't see yet... if you can put the windows down (access, and if electric windows before you secure the battery) roll them down almost all the way. Then, either use a window punch on the very top of the window and most of the glass will fall inside the door.

                        Or...

                        Using your glass removal saw, when the window is almost all the way down, use the notch in the t-handle, place the glass in the notch, and simply twist the tool. The glass breaks easily every time.
                        God Bless America!Remember all have given some, but some have given all.
                        Google Is Your Friend™Helpful forum tip - a "must see" if you're new here
                        Click this to search FH Forums!

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                        • #13
                          You can also use a halligan to produce the same results-either twisting or pulling down.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Truckees and their Haligans!

                            With regard to the center punches, I have carried the same center punches (2) for over ten years without a problem (just tension them properly & regularly). I have seen these pull and relase ones as well. They both seem to work equally well.

                            RE: MetalMedic's comment "Tape, shelving paper, spray adhesives are all probably really neat ideas. Unfortunately, most crashes I have been on happen in the rain or the snow... all of these things don't seem to stick real well when you put them on wet glass."

                            He is right on the mark here.

                            This is one of the reasons I had the guys start using floor mats (most cars have them too)to cover the insides of the windows when breaking them. Living in the Seattle area we have a lot of wet days and the sticky stuff won't work.

                            Be Safe.

                            Fraternally, JT
                            "Making Sense with Common Sense"
                            Motor Vehicle Rescue Consultants
                            ( [email protected]) Jordan Sr.

                            Comment

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