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How Do You Build the Simple StepChock?

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  • How Do You Build the Simple StepChock?

    Received a question from a Tennessee firefighter who will be constructing wood stepchocks for his fire department. He's asking about treated vs. untreated wood. Problem is the guys want it one way and the "Boss" wants it another. What advice do you have for our man-in-the-middle?

    Question:
    My son is working on an Eagle project for the Fire Department building Step Cribbing for each truck company. We have talked to the firefighters and they want use to use untreated wood to build these because of slippage. When talking to the boss of the fire department he would like us to use treaded wood so they will last. Which do we use and does it matter and if it does is there some where I can get information to give to either that explains which one is best to use.

    My Reply:
    Either treated or untreated wood will work. There is no 'best practice' to go by with for this item. Since your group is doing it as a 'gift' to the department, then I'd go with the wood type the boss wants. Personally, I recommend untreated wood because the treated stuff resists moisture by design. This can make that wood surface slippery under certain moisture or cold weather applications. If the untreated stuff gets contaminated with gas or diesel, etc, throw it away and build another one.

    Make your bottom layer 2"x6" and then 2"x4" for the layers. Make sure you screw & glue the layers together.

    Here's a tip. Let's call the tallest end of the finished stepchock the "back" side. Stager the end of the second and third, or second, third, and fourth layer of wood on the back side so they are not out as far as the others. If you indent these layers two inches or so, you can screw a piece of strap webbing from the top layer to the bottom layer and the guys will have a sort of recessed handle to grab and carry the step chocks with.
    Ron Moore, Forum Moderator
    www.universityofextrication.com

  • #2
    Originally posted by rmoore View Post
    Make sure you screw & glue the layers together.
    Everyone make step chocks a little different; bigger or smaller, lighter or heavier, all depends on the departments needs. But that is the one design feature no one should omit: Screwed and glued.
    We do not rise to the occasion. We fall back to our level of training.

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    • #3
      Screwed and glued.

      Well I'm HALFWAY there,hehe T.C.
      Last edited by rmoore; 12-20-2010, 12:23 AM.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
        Screwed and glued.

        Well I'm HALFWAY there,hehe T.C.
        Poligrip?

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        • #5
          Nope! Screwed! hehe T.C.

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