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    fireinthesky64
    Forum Member

  • fireinthesky64
    replied
    Ok.

    Regarding the training scenario you mentioned: I'm originally from the other side of 'the pond' and there we would have, in every situation, stabilized first. I'm not sure if you wanted major RTA's (oops, I mean wrecks) or just something you can do on a station level.

    Some things we did on station included

    Side-on collision pinning vehicle against a wall. Makes for a nice tight space to work in. If you add injury/casualty variables that require that the vehicles cannot be moved this, can be quite a challenge for a small crew.

    upside down -releasing casualties upside down is interesting!



    Techniques
    Using Backgrab chains and spreaders or rams to pull a steering wheel forward and off a casualty.

    Dashboad rolls - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZwfd6E4H_U

    If you have time/funding using stage make-up fake blood and 'acting' casualties lends for better handling of real incidents.

    If you can rotate personnel to be live casualties, it's quite valuable to get a casualties perspective.

    In the UK we don't have integrated fire and ambulance stations so when we got an Ambulance service trainer in to teach us how to load a casualty onto a spine board at the end of an extrication training session it was a good learning experience for both parties.

    Leave a comment:

  • GFD615
    Forum Member

  • GFD615
    replied
    Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
    How FAR off the road? If it was 95' or less we would use our platform and work from there. That DOES make for an interesting(and challenging)job. T.C.
    About 50 feet

    Leave a comment:

  • Engine4Cap
    Forum Member

  • Engine4Cap
    replied
    The greatest thing bout any type of rescue work, wether it be car crashes, or any one of the technical rescue disciplines is the ability to think outside the box and where there can be mulitple ways to reach the same outcome. Knowing the limits of every tool you have and how to use them to their highest potentional is key in rescue work. Have an awesome wrecker/flatbed operator can make easy work out of many car crashes as well.

    Leave a comment:

  • pasobuff
    Forum Member

  • pasobuff
    replied
    Originally posted by GFD615 View Post
    How about this one? We had a 2-passenger light pick-up truck went off the road and over the embankment going downhill on a curve. From a distance, it looked like the truck was street level wrapped around a tree about 10 yards off the road.. As we got closer, we found the truck wrapped around a tree...but about 8ft up in the air.
    Brings to mind a similar one I went to - report of vehicle accident, on back road, going down a hill and around corner - well, the van didn't make the corner and went off the road.....same thing - looked like it was 'ground level' to find it was wedged between trees off the ground....

    What also didn't help was all the 'stuff' in the van moved forward on impact and onto the driver.....buried him.....

    I remember being on the hoseline and ducking behind a stone wall while the tow truck tried to pull the van out (was in saplings so they bent)...in case the tow cable snapped.....we had something to hide behind.

    Leave a comment:

  • Rescue101
    Forum Member

  • Rescue101
    replied
    Originally posted by GFD615 View Post
    How about this one? We had a 2-passenger light pick-up truck went off the road and over the embankment going downhill on a curve. From a distance, it looked like the truck was street level wrapped around a tree about 10 yards off the road.. As we got closer, we found the truck wrapped around a tree...but about 8ft up in the air.
    How FAR off the road? If it was 95' or less we would use our platform and work from there. That DOES make for an interesting(and challenging)job. T.C.

    Leave a comment:

  • GFD615
    Forum Member

  • GFD615
    replied
    How about this one? We had a 2-passenger light pick-up truck went off the road and over the embankment going downhill on a curve. From a distance, it looked like the truck was street level wrapped around a tree about 10 yards off the road.. As we got closer, we found the truck wrapped around a tree...but about 8ft up in the air.

    Leave a comment:

  • Rescue101
    Forum Member

  • Rescue101
    replied
    GOOD ONE! Think I'll ponder on this a bit. Don't think a Front Flap would have been MY choice but as long as it works. Appears to be a pretty good chance for some bag work and a relocation. Certainly a scene that should provoke some thoughts(and comments). T.C.

    Leave a comment:

  • ejfeicht
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • ejfeicht
    replied
    Originally posted by Rescue101 View Post
    Car vs Schoolbus rear underride is another pretty popular item. If Ron has a pic somewhere maybe we could work that a bit. They can be quite challenging at times due to the way attachments are put on the rear of the bus(tow hooks). Not to mention they often become Mci's. a GOOD subject for discussion. T.C.
    Here is a fairly complex one that I came across. Not a ride under but a rollover with both the bus and pickup occupied. A 3rd occupied vehicle (van) struck the side of the bus dislodging the rear axle causing the rollover. It appears that they flapped the roof forward on the pickup and completed a rear extrication through the bed of the truck.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

  • Rescue101
    Forum Member

  • Rescue101
    replied
    I've used the Gojacks,they're handy. I've also seen them IMPROPERLY used on a slope,let's just say it was FUN to watch. They have a few uses but are best at flat ground moving of vehicles. I Certainly wouldn't buy a set for the Rescue Engine because of this and space limitations. There are other tools that can do MORE that that space can be used for. If space and $ are NO object you most ceratinly could find a use for them.Skates are good,you still need to lower the car a little or raise the trailer if you want to insure a smooth removal.WM skates are the best as you can interlock them to get a bigger footprint. T.C.

    Leave a comment:

  • billyleach
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • billyleach
    replied
    Go-Jacks

    Yes, Go-Jacks require some lift and are an expensive option. The lift of the car would be minimal I think IF the heavylifting unit did it's job.

    Using a winch is a good option, however may offer some 'jerking' as the casualty moves.

    Another option, 'skates'. They work well and are cheap.

    Leave a comment:

  • Rescue101
    Forum Member

  • Rescue101
    replied
    Car vs Schoolbus rear underride is another pretty popular item. If Ron has a pic somewhere maybe we could work that a bit. They can be quite challenging at times due to the way attachments are put on the rear of the bus(tow hooks). Not to mention they often become Mci's. a GOOD subject for discussion. T.C.

    Leave a comment:

  • Rescue101
    Forum Member

  • Rescue101
    replied
    Shows what you can do with a Light Medium Tow truck on a EMPTY trailer.Looks like an old 45' box so it isn't a REAL challenge. I LOVED those trailers,you could upright them loaded without having the sides/roof blow out. NOT like the New 53's. The object, of course, is to relieve the pressure on the Shadow(car)by raising the nose of the trailer and transferring the load to the rear axles. The PROBLEM with this is these jobs are SELDOM with unloaded trailers and NEVER this clean. The Objective,however,remains CONSTANT: You need to LOWER the car or RAISE the trailer or BOTH.You can raise the tractor(missing in this pic)by use of jacks,airbags or a Heavy tow truck if available. Just a few inches of raise will generally free the car. I would prefer to winch the car out to work it AFTER the raise/release but some will disagree. Now, if you block the fifth wheel so it doesn't rock, any lift you put on the front of the Tractor will be amplified on the trailer. Not something that will work well with the average bottle jack but a couple good air bags will give you some clearance.Be SURE to block the wheels. OR you can lift on the trailers rear axle. If you block the axle first,you won't lose lift on suspension compression. These aren't terribly uncommon,if you haven't had a chance to work one,PRACTICE UP;Chances are GOOD you will before your career is over. BTW Ron, how did you guys do this one? T.C.
    Rescue101
    Forum Member
    Last edited by Rescue101; 02-02-2011, 10:11 PM.

    Leave a comment:

  • rmoore
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • rmoore
    replied
    Now, with T.C. monitoring every single message that has ever been posted, I know he'll enjoy this. Here's one solution to underride that we used at one of our yearly tow operator/ FD joint training drill. We'll need him to explain to the specifics of this technique to the rest of us novice responders.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

  • rmoore
    MembersZone Subscriber

  • rmoore
    replied
    So, one of the scenarios we're talking about is a basic underride. Here is a training scenario of underride.
    Attached Files

    Leave a comment:

  • Rescue101
    Forum Member

  • Rescue101
    replied
    Go jacks in certain cases like underrides not always so good. They require a certain amount of LIFT to work. And Control on slopes CAN be an issue. Given my preferences a winch or comealong would be MY preference. Not that a Gojack isn't a handy tool but rather expensive for limited applications. T.C.

    Leave a comment:

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